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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    51

    Default Requeening question

    I am looking to requeen some hives and was hopping to get some opinioins if it is a good way to go.
    I want to introduce new mated, caged queens directly into queen right colonies, without killing the old queen or leaving it queenless for some time. The new queens will be released from the cage in about 1-2days. In your opinion, what is the success rate using this method? Thanks.

    In one hive I searched for the queen one day for about one hour, she was nowhere to be found, then found her on the next day.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,407

    Default Re: Requeening question

    My guesstimation of success rate with the described technique = about zero. You'd probably have a better rate if you just directly released the new queens, but it still wouldn't be very good.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    7,007

    Default Re: Requeening question

    You would have more luck putting your truck in drive and running in front of it.
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default Re: Requeening question

    Good luck...but even that won't help your new queens. They will be balled and killed either in the cages or out if you don't get rid of the old ones first.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid. John Wayne

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Greensburg, Ky.
    Posts
    1,148

    Default Re: Requeening question

    Thats like taking money and throwing it out the window!!!! That pretty much sums it up!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    4,085

    Default Re: Requeening question

    You need to learn to find and possibly mark your queens. Re queening just to re queen is poor management anyway. If it ain't broke don't fix it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default Re: Requeening question

    All I can do is suggest this link in Beesource for different threads [only about 10] about methods used for finding queens when you really have to find them. I can't pick out the best one for you right now. You have to be logged in to see the list of threads. Hope it works: http://www.beesource.com/forums/sear...searchid=40067

    "Everyone has trouble finding a queen from time to time...some more than others. When I'm working in my apiary, and having many queens to find, and having beginner helpers that couldn't find a queen if it craweled up their...nose, I had to come up with a way for my help to actually help. Standing around while the "boss" is looking for a queen isn't the answer." > Michael Palmer. >> http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...finding+queens
    Last edited by Oldbee; 04-22-2011 at 01:27 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Default Re: Requeening question

    >I want to introduce new mated, caged queens directly into queen right colonies, without killing the old queen or leaving it queenless for some time. The new queens will be released from the cage in about 1-2days. In your opinion, what is the success rate using this method?

    My experience is 0%.

    On the other hand putting in 14 day old queen cells is more like 80%

    Queen Spotting:
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesqueenspotting.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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