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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa, USA
    Posts
    833

    Default queen cell question

    I have a quick question for you all, and I thought this section would be better to ask it. I did a cut-out last Saturday, was in the hive tonight and couldn't find the queen. ( I thought she wasn't doing well when I found her on Saturday) I did find some queen cells as it appears to me. I'd like to get your thoughts as to what you think I should do. I'll copy a post I wrote earlier.

    Ok guys. I welt out to the hive tonight after work and couldn't find the queen. I did however find queen cells which made me VERY excited!!! I think at least 2 cells if not more. The bees wouldn't leave them open for very long (I had to smoke them away to get this picture) so I could get a good look. In this picture there's one larva that you can see. Right below that (the next square down) there's what seems to be a capped queen cell. (Is this correct?) It's hard for me to see the capped queen cell in this picture. The bees were quick to get back on them. There are also at least 2 other queen cells that could have larva in them I'm not sure. I think one of them I did look at and there was larva with royal honey in it which is also a great sign.

    http://i1176.photobucket.com/albums/.../queencell.jpg

    So my question for you all tonight is what should I do? Should I let them go and do whatever they want or do you think I should try to go back and cut out that capped queen cell? I'd love to get 2 hives from this one, but I don't know about it because they don't have a ton of bees. They fill up one deep body fairly well so I thought I could split it, but I'm not sure. What are your thoughts?
    Last edited by Barry; 04-14-2011 at 08:32 PM. Reason: image too large

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    orange, virginia usa
    Posts
    79

    Default Re: queen cell question

    Both the cells in the picture aren't capped. you said there is one that is capped? An good old beek told me some time ago they (the bees) know better than we do. Let them do their thing. I see you are in Pa. tocold yet to split just one deep and have enough bees. let them go and feed them well and get them into two boxes and the weather will be warmer by then and then split them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Clay Count, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    819

    Default Re: queen cell question

    I will never ever cut out a queen cell again. Is the worst advise I have ever received. Lost hives going into winter because they were replacing the queen and I stopped them and then they would not take a new installed queen. I'll use the swarm cells to stock nucs and let them raise their own queen. I'll leave the supersedure cells to let them replace a queen on their own.

    I could not tell from the picture if there is a larva in those queen cups. They build empty cups just in case they need to start a queen later so I don't cut them out either. I may live long enough for someone to convince me to cut out queen cells again, or not. I'm looking forward to capped queen cells to use to start new nucs!

    From the position of those cells I'd think if they have larva in them then they are supersedure cells. That's a ton of bees on that frame to be a failing queen. Beat ya there is no larva in those cells and they are just keeping them around just in case.
    Try living life with the attitude it's not about what you want to do but what you should do!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa, USA
    Posts
    833

    Default Re: queen cell question

    If you see in the picture the larva that is there. (using the mesh that's holding the comb in as a grid. . . starting at the upper right if you go to the left 3 squares and down 4 you'll see the larva that I'm talking about. The capped cell is in the square below that one) The capped cell is in the square right below it. There's a bee on it the capped one makes it hard to see.

    Sorry barry for the large picture. I don't know how to make it smaller.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    151

    Default Re: queen cell question

    Looks like it may be a drone cell to me. There is no downward position of the cell and that larvae is big with very little (if any at all) royal jelly. A queen larvae that size would be floating in a nice bed of royal jelly. id say its a drone cell....

    whoops...looking at wrong cell yup, its hard to see if there are eggs or larvae in those two cells... maybe just play or maybe supercedure. Ive sometimes seen when I do removals, that it cause enough disturbance to the colony taht they think they lost their queen but they really havent....thy figure it out a couple of days later...especially if your queen is safe and unharmed. If she didnt look well when you removed he from the cutout then they may be trying to supercede her.
    Last edited by honeyman46408; 04-15-2011 at 07:55 AM. Reason: UNQ

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Okeechobee FL
    Posts
    43

    Default Re: queen cell question

    Wait till its warmer then take the frame with the capped cell put that into a nuc along with a honey frame and pollen and brood leaving behind the rest. Add foundation or if you use foundationless frames to your old hive to makeup frames you took out.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,575

    Default Re: queen cell question

    Definitely leave the queen cells alone. Chances are very good that they are replacing the queen. She could have been injured in the cutout. Let the bees sort this out.

    BTW, please let us know what this green grid material is, and where can it be purchased? Looks like a really neat solution to holding comb from a cutout. Thanks

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