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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Foley Missouri USA
    Posts
    21

    Default Pollen capital of the U.S.?

    The St. Louis area is brutal when it come to airborne pollens.
    Does this translate into a good area to collect pollen in pollen traps?

    I would like to hear from some people in the Midwest who use pollen traps.

    How much pollen are you able to collect over a season per hive?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Foley Missouri USA
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Pollen capital of the U.S.?

    Hello again,

    Is there anyone in Missouri Iowa Illinois Arkansas Nebraska who uses pollen traps and could give me an idea of how they use them and what kind of success they have?
    Any input would be appreciated.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default Re: Pollen capital of the U.S.?

    "The St. Louis area is brutal when it come to airborne pollens.
    Does this translate into a good area to collect pollen in pollen traps?"

    Not really. Plants that are mostly pollinated by the wind are not visited by honey bees very much.

    Anemophily or wind pollination is a form of pollination whereby pollen is distributed by wind

    "Pollen from anemophilous plants tends to be smaller and lighter in weight than pollen from entomophilous [insect pollinated] ones, with very low nutritional value to insects. However, insects sometimes gather pollen from staminate anemophilous flowers at times when higher protein pollens from entomophilous flowers are scarce. Also anemophilous pollens may also be inadvertently captured by bees' electrostatic field. This may explain why, though bees are not observed to visit ragweed flowers, its pollen is often found in honey made during the ragweed floral bloom. Other flowers that are generally anemophilous are observed to be actively worked by bees, with solitary bees often visiting grass flowers, and the larger honeybees and bumblebees frequently gathering pollen from corn tassels and other grains.
    Almost all pollens that are allergens are anemophilous. Ragweed, the bane of many hayfever sufferers, is anemophilous. Its pollen has been found at sea hundreds of miles from its source. Spring hayfever often traces to pollens from birches."
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anemophily

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Saratoga Springs, NY
    Posts
    170

    Wink Re: Pollen capital of the U.S.?

    Wikipedias' bees may inadvertantly capture ragweed pollen with an electrostatic field, but mine use pollen baskets.




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    arnoldsville, ga
    Posts
    88

    Default Re: Pollen capital of the U.S.?

    LOL here in Ga, when the pines are in pollen, the bees only have to fly out of the hive and back in to have a full load!

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