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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    North Babylon,NewYork,USA
    Posts
    25

    Default blue ceilings/splits

    Two questions for the experts:

    1. On a tour of Charleston SC, the guide told us that they paint their porch ceilings sky blue to keep the bees away. I've just painted a new hive the same color of sky blue. Will this bee a bee turn off?

    2. In the newest addition of Bee Culture, the author speaks of making a split and then moving the new colony away so the foragers don't return to the first hive. I was planning on making a split but since I have limited space, putting the new ( sky blue) hive on the bench next to the first one. Will this work or be a disaster waiting to happen?

    Ma-Honey

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Bloomington, IN, USA
    Posts
    307

    Default Re: blue ceilings/splits

    1. It is called Haint Blue. It is traditional in some parts of the South. It is said to extend dusk, thus keeping the wasps etc away longer. Haint is from Haunt and was used by the slaves on doors and windows to keep bad spirits away. I have no idea if it works for wasps or for spirits, but it sure is pretty. (Google is a great place)

    2. ?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6,918

    Default Re: blue ceilings/splits

    I paint hives whatever color is in the mismatch bin at Home Depot, including light blue. That is a new tale!
    You can split the hive and put it wherever you need to. You can put a branch or something to make them reorient in the entrance. They wll be fine. April is the month we make splits around here. It is the earliest we can get good queens. Here are a few pictures from last year. http://www.beesource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=240460 They really have to reorient with about 75 new hives in a day.
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,081

    Default Re: blue ceilings/splits

    "A Haint caint haint a haint." Haint=Ghost.
    Mark Berninghausen #youmatter

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Whitehall Texas
    Posts
    79

    Default Re: blue ceilings/splits

    Painting the ceiling blue is to keep the mud daubers from building their mud nests on the ceilings, not honey bees... Seems to work

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Columbia county, New York, USA
    Posts
    1,535

    Default Re: blue ceilings/splits

    Quote Originally Posted by dmpower View Post
    1. It is called Haint Blue. It is traditional in some parts of the South. It is said to extend dusk, thus keeping the wasps etc away longer. Haint is from Haunt and was used by the slaves on doors and windows to keep bad spirits away.
    That's interesting- when I lived in Puerto Rico, you could go to a botanica (an herb/medicinal/Santeria/spiritual-magic type shop) which was often run by Puerto Ricans of largely African descent (descended from the old sugar cane plantation slaves), and you could buy a little ball of the most beautiful intense twilight blue chalk. You were supposed to use this chalk to mark little blue X's above your doors and windows or on the path to your door, in order to keep bad people and bad spirits from entering your home. I think I still have a little blue chalk ball somewhere in a box!
    The little bee returns with evening's gloom,
    To join her comrades in the braided hive... -Tennyson

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
    Posts
    2,025

    Default Re: blue ceilings/splits

    Quote Originally Posted by Ma-Honey View Post
    ... I was planning on making a split but since I have limited space, putting the new hive on the bench next to the first one. Will this work or be a disaster waiting to happen?
    Placing the splits side-by-side should work. Michael Bush recommends placing splits so that the entrances face each other: for example, if the original hive faced south, the two splits face each other (east/west).

    You can always equalize the hive populations later if needed.

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