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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Outagamie County, Wisconsin USA
    Posts
    835

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    If your hives are any distance from the hedge, there will need to be quite some height to the hedge to provide the windbreak. Is this windbreak mainly for winter or all year? I vote for a variety of things to include flowering/fruiting bushes and trees mixed in with arborvitae and blue spruce. What would be the length of the hedge? How many acre apiary?

    Check out Raintree Nursery for bareroot available in the spring. I have ordered many things from them three years in a row and was happy with what I got.They may be somewhat sold out on some of their stuff this year, but there is always next year. Keep in mind that bareroot would be sent in a dormant state.
    http://www.raintreenursery.com

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC
    Posts
    706

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    The original post said,

    Quote Originally Posted by Roscommon Acres View Post

    ...exposed to the north wind.
    We live in Nebraska, on the border of zones four and five.
    Many of the plants suggested are not hardy for your location.

    Example,

    Ligustrum lucidum, chinese privet USDA zone 7-9
    Ligustrum japonicum, japanese privet USDA zone 7-9
    Ligustrum japonicum 'texanum', Texas privet USDA zone 7-9
    Buxus sempervirens, common boxwood USDA zone 6-9
    Escallonia sp., Escallonia USDA zone 8-10

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Marquette, NE, USA
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    I would go to your NRD office in Tecumseh. Here is a list of shrubs they have available.
    American Hazelnut
    American Plum
    Amur Maple
    Black Chokeberry
    Caragana
    Chokecherry
    Common Lilac
    Elderberry
    False Indigo
    Golden Currant
    Nanking Cherry
    Peking Cotoneaster
    Redosier Dogwood
    Sand Cherry
    Serviceberry
    Silver Buffaloberry
    Skunkbush Sumac
    Winterberry Euonymus


    Brian

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Lavaca county, Texas
    Posts
    489

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Check out a website called Forestfarm dot com. They are a great nursery in either Washington or Oregon. (I'm having a memory lapse )

    They have a feature on their search engine for choosing "honey plants", "wind breaks", "hedges", "deer resistant", etc. And they have tons of shrubs. If nothing else, put together a list there, and go to your local nursery.

    Be aware that newer cultivars are often less bee-friendly than heirloom varieties. When I lived in Denver, Nanking cherry did very well. And the "cherries" are edible, if you can beat the birds to them.

    A note on invasive species: Sometimes this depends on local conditions. Plants that overwinter in south Texas might die to the ground in more northern locations, and not be as invasive.

    And as always, plants are living things, too. They need nurturing and cultivation as well as people and animals do. If it needs trimmed, cut it back. If it needs contained, don't plant it in the open. If it needs full sun, don't plant it under the oak trees, etc. I see many things planted inappropriately or ignored for decades, both of which cause problems. It's much easier to shear back a rose every year and cut out dead canes, than rent a dozer to take out a rose hedge 30 years from now.

    Good Luck!
    Summer

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    North Tazewell, Virginia
    Posts
    359

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Bee Bee trees can be trained in the form of a hedge great flowering in fall no idea if they would grow in that zone. Look John up in for sale he sells trees and seeds very knowledgeable.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    3,525

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Caragana or Russian pea tree makes a dense hedge and is a good flow will grow anywhere and survive tough conditions. I never have seen chokecherries cause a problem for cattle or sheep. They are endemic here and a wonderfull flow.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Big Stone Gap, VA
    Posts
    792

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by Vance G View Post
    Caragana or Russian pea tree makes a dense hedge and is a good flow will grow anywhere and survive tough conditions. I never have seen chokecherries cause a problem for cattle or sheep. They are endemic here and a wonderfull flow.
    Do you know of a source for the Russian pea tree?

    Thanks
    Shane

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ennis, TX USA
    Posts
    5,055

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Chinese Photinia
    Chuck Norris once roundhouse kicked Hulk in the face. Now he hides in the forest and changed his name to Shrek

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Danbury, CT
    Posts
    2,863

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Hedge Apple (osage orange) grows very well in your area and makes a fine windbreak/hedge if cut back frequently. It does require insect pollination, but I don't know if it will produce honey.... pollen in the spring if nothing else.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baker Oregon
    Posts
    2,291

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Quote Originally Posted by bluegrass View Post
    Hedge Apple (osage orange) grows very well in your area and makes a fine windbreak/hedge if cut back frequently. It does require insect pollination, but I don't know if it will produce honey.... pollen in the spring if nothing else.
    It also makes great staves for longbows.
    Dan Hayden 4 Years. 9 hives. Tx Free. USDA Zone 5b.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    3,525

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Concerning the Caragana or Russian pea tree: Call you local county extension office. If it grows there they will usually be a cheap source of trees.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Johnson County, NE USA
    Posts
    52

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Wow, thanks everyone! For some reason, I didn't notice this had gotten updated more.

    So many things to look at. We're starting with a hedge of hazelnut. It won't be too thick for winter, but we're adding a snow fence to that to slow down the wind a bit.

    Dimenstions for the apiary are 25 by 25 feet. We have trees planted along the north where the winter winds come from and along the west where most of our storms come from. The east and south are open, hopefully to the sun.

    If we need to, we can always move them to this side of our windbreak, but over there they can work in peace with little disturbance from mowers and people and poultry.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Danbury, CT
    Posts
    2,863

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Silt fence run along the edges of the hive in the winter is a cheap and easy solution. It requires no maintenance in regards to pruning, trimming, raking leaves etc. Put it up in the fall take it down in the spring.
    Always question Conventional Wisdom.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Susquehanna county, PA
    Posts
    124

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    http://www.biobees.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=2072

    shows how a person who has a warre hive keeps the wind/snow off them in the winter i though it was a pretty smart way to do it.

    "" leaned some
    sticks against the hive, linked them with some wire and stuck spruce
    twigs into the wire. This gives a nice "heap" which protects the hive
    from severe wind and insulates it a bit. Snow doesn't accumulate at the
    entrance. ""

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lake County Ill
    Posts
    329

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    You need to be careful as some species are not very edible. The one you do not want is the Viburnum Opulus. The others are not as bitter and more edible. Many nurseries that sell these materials do not know the difference. You may want to discuss this before you purchase.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Manitowoc WI USA
    Posts
    353

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    Holy smokes, look at those thorns.

    The riff raff will think twice about jumping over the fence.

    Scroll down a bit.

    http://www.colostate.edu/Dept/CoopEx...s/hawthorn.htm

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Clinton, NY
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Hedge for an apiary

    The issue with the cherries and livestock is only with WILTED leaves; livestock can eat fresh or dried leaves without ill effect but wilted leaves can poison them. It's usually NOT enough of an issue to make it a problem, especially if you electrify the fence in your area. IDK...

    It's interesting to note the differences in hardiness zones and climate; here, we're within the same hardiness zone as the OP, but we don't start seeing winter go until sometime around -- well, should've been now, but we've had snow 4 of the last 5 days and morning lows in the teens. Reading some of the posts here and on other threads and even other sites where you guys have bees foraging in February, or even March, makes me do a double-take.

    - Tim

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