Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Bishop Hill, IL
    Posts
    4

    Default Extracting crystallized honey on the hive

    Hi folks,
    I had my strongest hive die out over winter. (So Sad!) After examination, I found that there is over 100 lbs on honey on the hive.
    Some is crystallized.
    What is the best way to extract this?
    Or should I feed it to other hives?
    Please advise,

    you can write me directly at mrgutzmer@gmail.com

    Thanks,
    martin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Lindley, NY,USA
    Posts
    194

    Default Re: Extracting crystallized honey on the hive

    Assuming that you did not use any late season chemicals in the hive......
    Wax melts at 165 degrees, but of course it gets real soft well before that.
    Crystalized honey will liquify at ???? I call it 120 degrees when I liquify jars, REALLY hot tap water.
    So you, and I, need to heat the frames to around 110 to 120 to liquify the honey, then I'd let them cool a bit before extracting to spare the wax.
    I pulled in six dead hives, gotta be over 200 pounds in them as well as leaving a lot for starting new hives.
    Try a 'bulb in a box" method.
    Good luck.
    Fred

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oregon City, Oregon
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: Extracting crystallized honey on the hive

    Best to leave the honey in the frames and freeze them if possible till needed then thaw overnight and place them in hives or splits, nucs etc..
    Honeydew

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,776

    Default Re: Extracting crystallized honey on the hive

    Make splits and use the frames of honey in those splits. Trying to extract crystallized honey is difficult, even if you have a Hot Room to heat the super in.

    If you don't want to make splits, you can incorporate these frames of honey into your remaining hives.

    What I did, about a month ago, here in SC, was that I rotated deep supers on my strong colonies and put another deep on top of those for extra room in case of good weather and a strong nectar flow before I returned to them. Being weeks behind us here in SC, you could do the same thing where you are now and in a cpl weeks have brood in that super to make a split w/.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads