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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
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    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    9,123

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    The letting it idle is great advise. Especially when
    the turbos been working hard. The idling will cool
    it down a lot and cut down on coking. I let mine
    idle before kicking it too.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,625

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    "coking"? Man, what I don't know. Maybe that's what is killing my truck.

    I don't recall reading anything in the owners manual about a cool down period. Why didn't anyone tell me. None of the number of mechanics I have seen mentioned anything like that. Did they just assume I knew? Or are there too many things I'm supposed to know for them to tell me about?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    moravia,ny
    Posts
    1,198

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    mark
    the reson for idle time is to let the turbo cool down. all the exhaust goes thru one side of it and it spins thousands of rpm's. if it is shut off too quick the oil for bearings is evaperated(wrong term) and will cause premature turbo failure. this is the biggest cause of turbo problems. the bearings end up running dry. ask the mechanic about it. again good luck

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,625

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Thanks, I will. Since this isn't a new turbo by any means, 80k, I don't need to drive any differently, do I.

    Was running 75mph at 3,000 rpms what caused the turbo to go? Or the previous 125,000 plus miles use? Time for a new turbo anyway?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,385

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    That's one reason I got into this truck. Friends were getting 16 plus mpg w/ theirs. But I have never gotten better than 10 and mostly 8 or 9. Which sucks.
    Yes that does. My gas V10 gets 12 mpg loaded up with a 4:10.
    Regards, Barry

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
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    9,123

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    I am guessing you haul a pretty good load?? Commercial
    truck are just better at hauling. More torque, etc. And
    are designed to run 500K easily. As important are the
    trany's.

    Turbo bearings are the failure point usually. Super
    high RPM and high heat are hard on bearings.

    Here's a good tidbit on coking and the idle issue. Even
    30 seconds of idling will reduce coking big time.

    I do the "no turbo" slow down for several miles after
    a long cruise in addition to idle. Not a big hassle for
    a lot of peace of mind.

    Excerpt:

    Best practice to ensure that your turbo lasts is to cruise at low RPM where no boost pressure is created for the last 15 minutes of your journey to let the turbo cool down properly. Some people suggest that you let the engine idle for 30 seconds before turning off the engine, or install a turbo timer to automate the task, but the oil pressure at idle speeds is too low to provide sufficient lubrication. You need at least 1,500 RPM for enough oil pressure to ensure that the bearings and shaft receives sufficient lubrication while the turbo cools down. It is for this reason that we do not recommend installing a turbo timer. You should also change the engine oil every 2,000 miles, and use a high-quality, synthetic, straight viscosity oil. These three simple things will ensure that you prolong the life of your turbo and that you never need worry about coked up turbo bearing failure again.

    http://www.custom-car.us/turbo/lubrication.aspx

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Kinda on your way..... (beds a bit small though)

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/FREIG...item3f07eeba52

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Garland, Bladen County, NC, USA
    Posts
    2,957

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    That 3126 Engine has proved to be a tough one for us. But it is kinda hard to believe a 2000 Freightliner could only have 15K miles on it....

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Tulsa OK. USA
    Posts
    846

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Alot of folks get a truck that "should be plenty for what I need" and then wonder why it wears out so quick.The problem is they buy a pick up and not a truck. I like to buy more TRUCK than I need, if you buy a 10,000 lb payload trk. and haul 10,000 lbs that truck is GOING TO WORK at it but if you buy a 15,000 payload trk and haul 10,000 lbs its alot easer on the truck and should meen less wear and tear and even better MPG. When you have more truck than you need the brakes wont overheat as quickly,more HP to spare and and less effort at highway speeds.I ran a GMC TOPKICK tank truck GVW 25.9K tare wt. 11.6K which left me 14.3K possible for payload but due to the tank size(1300 gal)the best I could do was 10.4 K, the truck ran 6 days a week and around 7000 miles a month and cost me less in maint than a 1 ton ran right at max GXW 5 days a weekand around 2000 miles a month. Jim
    Stop and smell the flowers, 50,000 ladies can't be wrong
    Bsweetapiary@aol.com

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Sorry to hear about your problem.....but diesels breaking is what has fed my family for nearly 30 years Just to clarify, turbos do not have bearings, none made that can withstand the speed at which they spin, they run on bushings with an oil slinger (no seal can stand up to it either) Actually they run on a thin layer of oil. Your turbo will have a waste gate if you can turn 3000 RPM, if the waste gate failed (it bypasses exhaust gases so the turbo doesn't over speed) it would quickly cause total turbo failure. The idle period on the engine is to let the turbo slow down as much as it is to cool it down, when you kill the engine right away it stops the flow of oil to the turbo which is still spinning fast......and that = much wear to the bushings. Wish I was there to hook you up and hope you get going soon.

    No you do not need to drive differently, without seeing it I can not say what caused it to fail but would lean toward a waste gate problem, I have trucks at work with the original turbo's in them with over 600,000 miles on them.
    Last edited by NasalSponge; 03-12-2011 at 12:58 PM. Reason: spelling
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
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    2,869

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Sundance: that excerpt must be talking about a turbo on a car because none of that applies to a diesel. For instance at 1500 rpm you WILL have boost, there is more than enough oil pressure at idle for a turbo on a diesel in fact pressure is not the main concern when it comes to a turbo, volume is (an ISM Cummins runs 35-40 psi @ idle) just consider how many hours semi's sit and idle @ truck stops. and I would never change oil in a diesel that often, in the afore mentioned engine we change oil every 20,000. I would go with the manufactures recommended interval on a pick-up.
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
    Posts
    1,674

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    ... engin...s, these days, are built to last a cpl 100,000 miles, aren't they?
    They always did last for a couple 100,000 miles, but in the past when the used car dealers got through shaving the mileage off the trade-ins they had knocked 140,000 miles off the clock. It only looked like car and truck engines lasted for only 60,000 miles then. About the late 80s or early 90s, (I think it was), the feds put everyone in Albertville, and Boaz, Alabama not in the grave yards in jail for odometer fraud. That is when vehicles started lasting longer.

    When I retired, owners of new trucks still wanted to buy used odometers and ECMs (computers) from me so they could run their trucks on my hardware and keep their original parts in storage in case they needed or wanted a repair under warranty.

    BTW, Be sure your wrench makes sure the oil delivery line and the oil return line to and from you turbo is clean as a whistle, and change the oil and filter before you get on the road again. Anytime after extended or heavy use let a Diesel engine idle 5 minutes to cool down the oil and the turbo bearings before you kill the engine. This is very important. Anyway, at an idle a Diesel uses so little fuel you will swear it is making fuel.

    I don't think you will like the fuel consumption rate on a gas burner.
    Last edited by Scrapfe; 03-12-2011 at 02:15 PM. Reason: bad menory
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Oregon City, Oregon
    Posts
    988

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Does dbest still have his nice lookin honey sled avail.....???
    Honeydew

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Garland, Bladen County, NC, USA
    Posts
    2,957

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    As of 2/23 he still had it forsale... cummins engine too.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Quote Originally Posted by NasalSponge View Post
    Sundance: that excerpt must be talking about a turbo on a car because none of that applies to a diesel. For instance at 1500 rpm you WILL have boost, there is more than enough oil pressure at idle for a turbo on a diesel in fact pressure is not the main concern when it comes to a turbo, volume is (an ISM Cummins runs 35-40 psi @ idle) just consider how many hours semi's sit and idle @ truck stops. and I would never change oil in a diesel that often, in the afore mentioned engine we change oil every 20,000. I would go with the manufactures recommended interval on a pick-up.
    I get it..... I was just using it to explain coking. I should have
    done more of a cut and paste. I still do the no spool up cool
    down and idle with all 3 of my diesels. And yes, I never would
    change oil that often.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,625

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    240 miles farther down the road. No problems so far. But every little sound, even from the radio, worried me.

    Thanks for all of the support and advice.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Sundance, Sorry if that came off snotty or something, didn't mean to at all!!
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Not at all NS, not taken that way at all.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Limestone Co, Alabama
    Posts
    1,674

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    If your puffer (turbo) bearings goes south, there will be millions of tiny steel specks circulating in your engine oil. It is imo better to remove these particles than to allow them to file away at your internal engine parts.

    My Super Duty will get about the same fuel mileage either loaded or unloaded, does your’s?

    Sundance, check on a F450 or F550.
    Scrapfe---Never believe anything in politics until it has been officially denied.--Otto von Bismarck.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,625

    Default Re: Takin' It On The Road.

    Right you are Scrapfe. The Repairman told me that they flushed the cooling system and changed the oil too. Road test showed engine smoking and low power. Found dirt in EGR valve. Removed it. Reinstalled the EGR valve.

    Should I get a new one when I have my 127,500 mile service done in a cpl weeks?

    Yes, pretty much the same fuel economy loaded and pulling a loaded trailer as it does empty. Not much dif, if any. It's been a long time since I have done the math.
    Last edited by sqkcrk; 03-13-2011 at 09:04 PM.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

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