Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 44 of 44
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,654

    Default Re: Joints on hive bodies

    Psfred wrote:

    I would expect new boxes, properly cared for, to outlast ones made in the 40's for that reason -- in those days, glue choices were limited, and I would expect most time none was used at all.

    I agree.

    As for nails, we have found Maze double dipped galvanized nails from Peru Illinois to be the best.

    Cerezha - a frequent coat of good paint, hopefully with a lot of linseed oil in it, will overcome all your concerns with end grain, and seal the nail.

    Crazy Roland

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,483

    Default Re: Joints on hive bodies

    Roland
    I agree that proper gluing and paint would address many issues, but I still uncomfortable with nails - the finger is too small to accommodate a standard size nail. I made a few standard mediums - all these nails... How many, 40 per box? Whoever invented this design - it is just too complicated for people like me without tradition behind. If it is a butt joint and screws, you could easily unscrew damaged panel and replace it if necessary (in such case screws must be open). Similarly - the frame. In another thread, people discussed how many nails they use per one frame - 20!!!!!! Manual labor! I guess, for true beekeepers, classical hardware is the way to go, but not for me... I simplified the box, I use 1x2 plank and screws for handles and I use top bar from the frame for foundationless "frame". Right now, I have approximately the same number of classical and modified boxes. Hopefully, I'll keep my hobby long enough to see a difference. The thing is that I am a hobbyist, I could afford what I am doing and I am doing it for fun (and some honey). Commercial beekeeping is entirely different. I would never do it commercially - too risky and stressful!

    By the way, Roland - oil-based paint? Here in California, forget it! It is banned in CA, only latex and may be acrylic.... I love linseed oil, but, unfortunately, it is not doing well in CA - too much heat and UV. I tried, it stayed for 6 mo may be...
    Sergey

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    2,654

    Default Re: Joints on hive bodies

    Christian says 36 - 7 d nails, and 4 - 5 d per deep.

    We have tried Soyguard, a soy product, with good results. That should please the tree huggers. It acts like linseed oil, but cleans up with water.

    Can you buy Rustoleum 7715 silver? We mix 2 parts linseed and one part Rustoleum for our old equipment.

    Crazy Roland

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,483

    Default Re: Joints on hive bodies

    Roland
    many thanks, I definitely will try. But, you know, SoCal weather... our biggest enemy is sun and UV. In Russia, we used to coat the whole log-houses with boiled linseed oil and it stays for decades - beautiful golden color! Here, linseed oil fails so quickly! Recently we completely re-did the trim on the house. Since they forbid oil-base paint, we need to remove all old oil-based paint (I love oil), sand, prime everything and paint with latex... The guy who did paint job told me that actually, latex is better in our area because it does not dry out as much as oil-based paint. When it dry - it cracks... a lot of learning... I definitely will see if Rustoleum 7715 silver and Soyguard available here. Have a nice day, Sergey

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads