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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Lawrence, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    44

    Default How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    1. Put 100+ people in a long shoebox of a room, but no stage for the presenters, so no one beyond the 4th row can see what's going on at front;

    2. Use a small screen for the Powerpoint projector so no one beyond the 4th row can see what's on the screen;

    3. Print out every Powerpoint and random handouts from the internet and bind them into a 2-inch-thick handout that is of very little use or value;

    4. Use examples (for flower bloom dates, swarm dates, general seasonal references) for locations outside of the area;

    5. Offer examples that apply to large-scale commercial beekeeping to your audience which appears to be mostly hobbyist beekeepers and first-timers.

    6. Pick your least dynamic speakers. The audience probably needs the sleep.

    7. Present none of the perspectives on Integrated Pest Management and non-chemical management of bees.

    8. Offer long, rambling answers to questions that really demand a short authoritative answer.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cass County, MO
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    448

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    I think we went to the same class!!
    4 seasons 19 Hives-Camp Branch Bee Ranch. Est 2009
    "I am a nobody; nobody is perfect, and therefore I am perfect."

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    fairfield,ohio
    Posts
    672

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    Any suggestions for a presentation I have been asked to give to a 3rd grade class.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lunenburg,N.S. Canada
    Posts
    276

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    " 3rd grade class"

    My advice, keep it short. I remember doing one for a grade 1 class and the teacher said "keep it around 20 minutes or you'll start to lose them". Sure enough, after 20 minutes some of them started wandering around. Maybe grade 3 is a little better but I would still keep length in mind.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Lawrence, Kansas, USA
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    44

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    You material sells itself. Take some props along... an observation hive would be great, but might not be possible. Even if you take a nuc, with a couple frames, talk about the queen, and the division of labor.... you'll only need to talk a few minutes and then they'll be bursting with questions and it'll take off from there.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baker Oregon
    Posts
    2,367

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    For a 3rd grade class. Short and sweet, with a lot of visual aids particularly stuff you can hand around that is tough and safe enough for lots of little hands. Also possibly a treat, like cut comb, but i would check with the school first.

    PS an observation hive would be cool for the kids.
    Dan Hayden 4 Years. 9 hives. Tx Free. USDA Zone 5b.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cass County, MO
    Posts
    448

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    Good advice!!
    I teach fire safety to 4 graders. They ask some excellent questions!!! Be sure not to let them get bogged down with stories like" one time when my cousin and I were at the park this one kid was on the slide and got stung by a bee." everyone has a story.

    Tell them right at the beginning of the Q/A time that you only have time for question and you “know the difference between a question and a story”.
    Tell them at that time if the want to share a story or have a question that does not get answered in class that they should write it down and give it to their teacher. She can them e-mail them to you and you will get back to them with the answer. You might have to shut down a story or two but you will open up a lot of time for real questions that spawn other questions!!!

    Don't be afraid to say "I don't know and I will have to get back to you" Remind them that being an authority on any subject does not mean you always have the right answer; but it means you know where to look to find it!!
    4 seasons 19 Hives-Camp Branch Bee Ranch. Est 2009
    "I am a nobody; nobody is perfect, and therefore I am perfect."

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Postville, Iowa, USA
    Posts
    380

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    Oh, gosh, I really enjoy teaching (math, science, computer). Good things to do when teaching third graders and adults:

    For the third graders, here are some ideas:

    Check with the teacher -- if okay, give them small samples of comb honey to eat. (Best done before a break, or there will be sticky all over!)

    Bring some filled frames with honey to show what it looks like right from the hive.

    Bring a clear container with bees and comb (unless you can manage to bring an observation hive -- even better!)

    Hand out a page with queen, worker, and drone bees to color.

    Bring an empty but complete hive and let students explore the parts inside the hive -- the inside cover, frames, etc. Show how the bees get into the hive and where they live.

    General ideas:

    Show by example, discussion, questioning, and demonstration ... don't just tell!
    Invite and encourage student participation ... don't just tell!
    KISS (keep it simple) and KIFF (keep it fun and funny!)

    Break it up -- talk for a bit, do an experiment or a demonstration, talk for a bit more, ask students to do an exercise or start up a discussion, talk a little more, etc.

    Expect students to be distracted at the start of class and right after breaks or lunch, so plan something a little less intellectual at those moments to lure them back into settling down and getting back into a learning mode.

    Be honest and approachable
    Pitch your voice a bit lower than usual (unless you already have a deep, strong voice!) and project your voice to the far end of the class room
    Look students in the eye -- not over their heads. Physically get down on their level if you can.
    Don't talk down to your students, but don't talk "over their heads" either

    Teach what you KNOW, not what you don't. If you really don't know the material you are trying to teach, students will pick up really fast on your weakness, even the little ones. The classroom is not the place for the teacher to learn his/her material -- practice and study before hand, if you need to.

    Give handouts well before class starts OR near the end of a class session. If you give handouts right at the beginning of class or a session, the distraction and all those rustling papers will keep your students from paying attention to you and your presentation.

    If someone asks a question that requires a long rambly answer, defer your answer until break or some other time when folks that are interested can be involved and the others who aren't can do something else.

    Do NOT get sidetracked into wrangles and debates that are of little interest to the group at large -- this is more of an issue with bigger kids and adults. Be polite and offer to continue the discussion later, but get back on topic and keep moving.

    On the other hand, be flexible and responsive to your students. If it seems right to talk about "X" at a moment when you thought you would talk about "Y", then cover topic "X" now and come back to "Y" later on.

    Expect your first teaching experience to be a bit awkward and stressful. Be sure to volunteer again and your second time will be much better and much more fun.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Lawrence, Kansas, USA
    Posts
    44

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    Kids certainly have a natural enthusiasm for learning about bees and beekeeping...and it's a great starting point to lead into other discussions about food and insects and farming and ....well, a host of topics.

    Generally, even beyond kids, I think many adults are fascinated by beekeeping... I know it's always a conversation starter when I mention I have bees. Such a pity that this interest and excitement can be killed by a poor presentation...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Louisville Kentucky USA
    Posts
    458

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    I have done a couple of beekeeping presentations,one for a garden club and one for a senior citizens group.You usually get a few minutes of general statements out and they will start asking questions.You usually cant answer all the questions in the time allotted but its not hard to hold peoples interest for an hour or more.I just got a callback from the garden club where a few folks wanted to start their own hives.I must have done my job with them.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Woodlawn, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    328

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    Take your smoker (the smell is great for kids).
    As you are demonstrating the equipment, have the teacher put the outfit on. Kids love seeing their teacher in the garb.
    Take a camera (or have the teacher bring one) and take a pic of each kid with the veil on.
    I always have a chuck of comb honey. The kids love it (and I get all kinds of reactions when I tell them they can swallow the wax). Just take a lot of plastic spoons!
    I made an observation hive just for these kids of demonstrations. But if you make one, keep it covered until you are finished. Because if the kids see it, you are DONE!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    fairfield,ohio
    Posts
    672

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    WOW!!! I certainly never expected such an abundance of knowledge shared so quickly.Thank you so much to each and every one for taking the time to respond.I was asked to put this on by a 3rd grade teacher in my sunday school class.Of course I said yes.I feel it to bee important to enrich our youth about the importance the honey bee plays in our lives. Thank you to all and have a Blessed day,Ken

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Albany, CA, USA
    Posts
    194

    Default Re: How to badly teach a beekeeping class; or, things not to do:

    I have had some parents ask me if they could bring their kids over some time. One of the parents told me the kids were studying bees, so there seems to be a definite interest!!

    You'll do great and we'll have more, young bee advocates!!
    Mil Apostol - Chef, Beekeeper, Gardener, Forager, and Geocacher
    http://www.UrbanFarmAndBeehives.com

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