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Thread: Queen rearing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Farwell, Michigan,USA
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    Default Queen rearing

    Lets suppose my one hive winters great, I check and see that there is little or no mite problems without treatment, no sickness's without any treatments and she raises a ton of brood and the hive produces great honey with calm bees all the good stuff. Can someone explain to a newbie how to rear more queens with her traits for my other hives. In laymen terms, the easiest method there is without hurting the current hive and ending up with lets say 3 more queens this year. Would also like to know of a book that does a good job explaining this and is easy to follow

  2. #2
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    Feb 2008
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    Reno, NV USA
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    Oldtimer just had an amazing thread on graftless queen rearing

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...ight=graftless

  3. #3
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    May 2010
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    Farwell, Michigan,USA
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    excellent thanks for the link. looks like some work and time involved. also looks like alot of fun.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
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    1,858

    Default Re: Queen rearing

    Personally, I like the Nicot system. One of the members of this forum refers to it as the "plastic contraption."

    It has it's limitations and some quirks. I posted how I do it at:

    http://www.nicot.homestead.com

    After posting it, I made some revisions and refinements which I hope to tweak this summer.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  5. #5
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    Aug 2002
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    There are many ways to raise a few queens. The main thing to keep in mind is that the queen needs to be well fed. This takes a lot of nurse bees and a income of resources. Remember the object is to maximize the number of queens for the least resources, but you still need to have a strong hive that has a lot of resources. Then you can pull all the queen cells and put them in separate nucs or hives.

    Here's a simple plan:
    http://bushfarms.com/beesafewgoodqueens.htm

    http://bushfarms.com/beesqueenrearing.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #6
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    Dec 2010
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    Dorset, Vermont
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    Quote Originally Posted by roughneck942003 View Post
    Would also like to know of a book that does a good job explaining this and is easy to follow
    Get C.C. Miller's classic book "Fifty Years Among the Bees." His queen rearing methods do not involve grafting and can be used by a beekeeper with just a few hives.

  7. #7
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    May 2010
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    Farwell, Michigan,USA
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    There are many ways to raise a few queens.
    You explain it well and make it easy sir. I appreciate it. Am on your site constantly and somehow missed this page although i did go through the second link a few days ago. Never having done this before I get confused easily. Does anyone sell the medium fram nucs you use for queen rearing or do you make your own?
    Last edited by Barry; 02-16-2011 at 04:35 PM.

  8. #8
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    May 2008
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    Concord, CA
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    4,162

    Default Re: Queen rearing

    The easiest way to get the resources might be to allow the parent hive to raise the new queens. Remove the old queen too a nuc with a couple frames of bees, & brood.


    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    There are many ways to raise a few queens. The main thing to keep in mind is that the queen needs to be well fed. This takes a lot of nurse bees and a income of resources. Remember the object is to maximize the number of queens for the least resources, but you still need to have a strong hive that has a lot of resources. Then you can pull all the queen cells and put them in separate nucs or hives.

    Here's a simple plan:
    http://bushfarms.com/beesafewgoodqueens.htm

    http://bushfarms.com/beesqueenrearing.htm
    Dan

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Lake County Illinois
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    261

    Default Re: Queen rearing

    Quote Originally Posted by KQ6AR View Post
    The easiest way to get the resources might be to allow the parent hive to raise the new queens. Remove the old queen too a nuc with a couple frames of bees, & brood.
    So leave the larger, stronger hive without a queen? Then they will raise a new queen, as if the old one disappeared...

  10. #10
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    Feb 2006
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    Huntersville, NC
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    Go to Youtube, search on Fatbeeman and watch the video titled QueenCells. It is a good video that shows Don cutting out queen cells to put in a nuc as Michael Bush described on his excellent web site.
    Thanks,
    Will

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    >Does anyone sell the medium fram nucs you use for queen rearing or do you make your own?

    Not that I know of. I just divided and cut down some ten frame deep boxes and put plywood or that plastic cardboard material on for bottoms and canvas on top for inner covers. You can buy "queen castles" or the like from Brushy Mt and Walter T. Kelley, but not in mediums. You could buy them and cut them down I suppose.

    Another simple thing to do though, is either use the five frame nucs and just put a couple of empty frames in or make follower boards and use them to reduce the size. Brushy Mt, Miller Bee Supply and others have medium nucs.

    >Get C.C. Miller's classic book "Fifty Years Among the Bees." His queen rearing methods do not involve grafting and can be used by a beekeeper with just a few hives.

    The queen rearing section is here for free:
    http://www.bushfarms.com/beesmillermethod.htm
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  12. #12
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    Sep 2007
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    Hudson, WI USA
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    With the Miller method he says to use wax foundation. If a person has no wax foundation, can a foundationless frame be used instead?

  13. #13
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    Hamburg, NY 14075
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    Default Re: Queen rearing


  14. #14
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    Dripping Springs, TX USA
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  15. #15
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    Yes, you can just cut the bottom edge of any comb with the right age larvae and they will build queen cells on it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    Michael,

    A lot of people have posted, over the years, about cutting boxes down to size - is there a special blade made for cutting through nails or staples? I know a carbide will do it, but the teeth tend to chip.

  17. #17
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    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    It's been a long time since I did this. Are you sure the cut will be where nails or screws are placed? All mine had box joints and I don't recall this being a problem.
    Regards, Barry

  18. #18
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    dadeville, alabama, USA
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    Barry, we just cut deep supers in half and clad the half to make four frame nucs. We cut, rip and boxes all the time. Sometimes you will hit a nail if it is a rabbet joint box. With a box joint, we never seem to have a problem. Some saw blades are better than others. The porter cable carbide blade is a good one. It basically is like in all beekeeping-what works best for you. As for queen rearing, I reared many a queen over the years. We use a four frame nuc, six pounds of newly shaken queenless bees. A frame of honey and two frames of good quality pollen. The pollen is the secret. We shake the bees into the nuc.Which is allowed to free flight. Wait one day. Then we drop our graft of about 36 queen cells. We place a feed jar of sugar syrup over the nuc and feed till the sixth day. Any longer and your cells are waxed up badly. On the tenth day you remove the queen cells that "took" and use them. For those of you that do not want to graft, Cut a comb with young larvae in half and place that half into the nuc as described above. Remember the secret is two good frames of pollen. Are you can cheat, and place a frame of young larvae, a frame of sealed brood and a frame of honey and POLLEN into a four frame nuc with adhering bees. Ten days later cut out all the queencells and use them elsewhere. Leave one for the nuc. We do this sometimes in a hurry when we are making up nucs. WE may make up to five hundred of them. TK

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Queen rearing

    The box joints do tend to land on the joints when cutting down. I've used carbides, and yes they can chip, but I have a blade I dedicate to just cutting when I might hit a nail.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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