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Thread: Warre question

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
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    Default Warre question

    I know this section of the forum is for TBHs, but I've seen some Warre people lurking around in here, too. I have just finished reading Beekeeping For All and am planning to build two Warre hives for spring. I am building the standard version, not modified.

    In the Warre plans, it shows the top bars as 11/32" thick. I plan on using 3/4inch thick lumber for my hive. Can I make my top bars 3/4" thick with no adverse affect? If not, what's the best way to split my 3/4" bars with a table saw? Splitting each one seperately seems like a lot of work, and my blade won't go high enough to do two at once.

    I've seen top bars for sale on one of the sites that sells this type hive (you know who you are!) for $1 each. That's an extra $64 that I don't really want to spend.

    Any additional advice would be appreciated! I'm buying lumber today and will start with the roof and work down. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    French Lick, Indiana, USA
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    14

    Default Re: Warre question

    This link might be helpful.

    Warré Top-Bar Construction

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
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    Default Re: Warre question

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveBee View Post
    I know this section of the forum is for TBHs, but I've seen some Warre people lurking around in here, too...
    Don't Warre hives fall under the top bar hive category? I know they're vertical, but they are a top bar design aren't they?

    I'm really interested in them as well. I really like my ktbh's, but I also really like a lot of the principals and logic behind the Warre. I just can't decide if I want to get into another hive type, or to keep learning with the ktbh and get proficient there before doing more experiments with other hives.

    All fun though...

    Adam

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Elizabeth, Colorado
    Posts
    69

    Default Re: Warre question

    I rip my boards down to the width and thickness dimensions before I cut them to length. That way I can run long pieces through the table saw and stack and cut them to length a bunch at a time.
    If I am using 3/4" pine I rip it to 1 1/8" x 3/4" strips and then rip each of those exactly in half on the 3/4" side which gives me 5/16" x 1 1/8" top bars.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Kingsley, MI. USA
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    167

    Default Re: Warre question

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveBee View Post
    In the Warre plans, it shows the top bars as 11/32" thick. I plan on using 3/4inch thick lumber for my hive. Can I make my top bars 3/4" thick with no adverse affect?
    You can make your top bars whatever thickness you want as long as you cut the rebates to match. The bees don't care. Mine are 1cm thick because that is Warre spec. and what my customers expect.

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveBee View Post
    I've seen top bars for sale on one of the sites that sells this type hive (you know who you are!) for $1 each.
    It must be me to whom you're referring since the other guy (I know who he is, too) charges $1.20 each. I must admit though, his are slightly fancier.

    Quote Originally Posted by SteveBee View Post
    Any additional advice would be appreciated!
    Be careful....don't cut your fingers off. Use cedar lumber, build with rabbet or box joints, don't paint, use glue when assembling.

    Good luck. I hope they turn out nice.


    Chris Harvey--Teakwood Organics

    www.thewarrestore.com
    Last edited by beez2010; 01-23-2011 at 05:11 PM. Reason: sp

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,925

    Default Re: Warre question

    3/4" is about twice 11/32". The results will be less attachments between boxes (I would consider that a good thing but it will make less "ladders" between boxes). That's what I'd use (the 3/4").
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Kingsley, MI. USA
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    167

    Default Re: Warre question

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    3/4" is about twice 11/32". The results will be less attachments between boxes (I would consider that a good thing but it will make less "ladders" between boxes). That's what I'd use (the 3/4").
    Michael,

    I am curious as to what your reasoning is for drawing that conclusion. Just to ts be sure you're understanding Steve correctly, he is referring to the thickness, or depth of the top bars. Not the width. The bars are about 1 1/8inch wide, just like typical lang fame top bars. You think the thickness of the bars would result in fewer attachments from one box to another? Just wondering if that's what you meant and if so, why? Thanks.

    Chris

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,925

    Default Re: Warre question

    It is documented (and it is consistent with my experience) in all of the old bee journals (late 1800s to early 1900s), the old ABC XYZ of beekeeping (late 1800s to mid 1900s) and the old C.C. Miller books (fifty years among the bees etc.) that a thick top bar is what keeps them from connecting between boxes. A thin top bar encourages connections between boxes.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Kingsley, MI. USA
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    Default Re: Warre question

    Thank you, Michael, I had not heard that before.

    Chris

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
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    Default Re: Warre question

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    It is documented (and it is consistent with my experience) in all of the old bee journals (late 1800s to early 1900s), the old ABC XYZ of beekeeping (late 1800s to mid 1900s) and the old C.C. Miller books (fifty years among the bees etc.) that a thick top bar is what keeps them from connecting between boxes. A thin top bar encourages connections between boxes.
    Is there a quick explanation why? Or a page number in 50 years among the bees I can look to?

    Thanks,

    Adam

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