Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 36
  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,548

    Post

    Is there such a thing as a box joint cutting machine that's set up with multiple cutters so the cut only requires a single pass to cut all the joints at once?
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    I am not aware of one, but it is sure a
    conceivable idea. I worked at a mill work
    for 5 years back in the 70's making and
    running cabinet parts (styles and tenons
    for the most part.)

    One of the most "awesome" was the gang rip
    saw. The arbor supported several 16" blades
    and was usually set up with 12 or so. I can
    imagine a smaller version with dados. You'd
    have to have some HP behind it though.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    Sure is coyote. The one I've seen is as big as a small car... or as small as a big car. Literally, it was the size of a large couch. I'm thinking of the unit that Humble Abodes uses. Looks like it was built about 1910 and weighed about a half a ton. If I recall properly, which is suspect, they'd feed in a whole stack of boards clamped tightly together at one time and cut the fingers on one end in one pass, then they'd turn the boards around and do the other ends.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,548

    Post

    I was googling the wrong terms. Here's one. There have to be other models that are not so industrial. I think. They call them "haunchers".

    http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_bas...box_joints.jpg
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Whitefield, Maine USA
    Posts
    6,624

    Post

    There you go. That's a much newer model than what I've seen though the principle is the same- moving blades, stationary wood.
    Dulcius ex asperis

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,331

    Post

    Bill Mraz, in Middlebury Vermont made one. Shaft has several stackable dado setups, spaced properly for box joint spacing. Place board on table, step on treddle, cutters rise up and make cuts. Very slick. If i had that machine, I'd probably make finger joints, and not rabbetted joints.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,864

    Post

    Fellow here just got a new one in, he will cut 800 boxes a day, from board to stacks on pallets.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    In my mind I'm seeing a couple of used old
    vintage arbors (well built and $25 on ebay)
    modified to hold 7 stacked dadoes mounted
    on a removable shaft. 2 pulleys on each end
    driven by a 3 to 5 hp 220V motor. Hmmmmmmm

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    if I'm not mistaken, Ross, who posts here, sells vintage woodworking stuff
    you ought to talk to him
    It doesn't seem like it would be to hard to build one if you're "handy" [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Dave

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,548

    Post

    I've got one of these old Craftsman saws. It was working when I bought it, it's now disassembled. The thing was too heavy for one person to move safely on and off of a pickup so I took it apart. It has really heavy parts.

    http://www.owwm.com/PhotoIndex/detail.asp?id=393
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    I hear you Coyote, I just finished assembling
    my 1948 with cast iron extensions. Man it
    is extremely heavy.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Red Bluff, Ca
    Posts
    301

    Post

    Most box joint cutters use carbide cutters 1 inch wide.
    Dan

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    Nice pic Coyote, thanks. I tried to buy a shop full of old iron a couple of years ago. One of the neatest machines was a tenoner. Wow could it rip off a tenon! Pretty amazing the ingenuity and quality of those old machines, although that picture looks pretty new.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    That is a dandy saw Coyote!! I am envious.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,548

    Post

    Careful now. That photo is from the old woodworking machines website. It's the same model as mine, but that's not mine. The one I have is complete but in pieces, and it doesn't have the casters. When I bought mine, I thought someone had cobbled the on/off switches together, but I found out that's actually the way they were built.

    p.s. Here's the link to the page that has hundreds and hundreds of pictures of old woodworking machinery.
    http://www.owwm.com/PhotoIndex/byMfg-list.asp

    [size="1"][ February 05, 2007, 09:47 PM: Message edited by: coyote ][/size]
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Devils Lake, North Dakota
    Posts
    9,123

    Post

    I understand coyote, I've used that site to
    view my old iron. Your's will look like the
    pictured one in no time. What a dandy unit.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Berkey, OH, USA
    Posts
    1,487

    Post

    coyote, you're gonna make some serious chips with that thing!

    Yeah I love "old arn" - I used to lurk over there at OWWM.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,548

    Post

    PM'd Sundance with this story, which I'll share.
    I got a call yesterday to go look at a piece of property and give the owner an estimate on it's value. He's 91, and worked as a cabinetmaker and woodworker here for decades. He's selling his home/shop and moving somewhere warmer. The shop was full of hand and power tools, everything from fine chisels to planers and jointers. It was one of those gems you only run across once or twice in your lifetime. Ethics prohibit me from trying to buy a clients stuff, so I could only look. Later in the day I found out that he'd sold all the equipment and tools to one fellow at a real bargain price. It was like looking at a museum.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern Arizona
    Posts
    25

    Post

    Hi coyote,
    There is another method for cutting joints if your interested. Something that I am going to try is a dovetail jig for a router. Dovetails are actually mechanically superior to box or finger joints because of the dovetail's tensile strength. I think that the dovetail joint has not been used more for hive production because only within the last few decades did they become easy to do.
    Porter-Cable makes a jig that can cut both dovetails and box joints.
    Here:
    http://www.coastaltool.com/cgi-bin/w.../port/4212.htm

    pretty cool huh? Thats for less than $150. The router bits can get a bit on the expensive side but I think that kit comes with them. Anyways I though I would share this in case you were interested.
    Anything is possible, it just takes longer.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads