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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    columbus,ohio,USA
    Posts
    518

    Default migrotory covers in the north?

    Can migrotory covers be used in the north with good overwinter success?
    Chris Cree
    Cree's Bees

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Shoshone County, Idaho
    Posts
    567

    Default Re: migrotory covers in the north?

    I use them along with some telescopic as well, but most of my bees are kept under lean-to type roofs built onto barns.
    Also have them on the bees out in the open and they seem to work well.
    I even prop them up approx. 1/4" for ventilation on one end.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Littlerock, California, USA
    Posts
    940

    Default Re: migrotory covers in the north?

    I don't live in the north but I use the migratory covers most of the year before swapping to the telescoping covers in the winter. I also have just two hives and they are in my backyard. It is not an hour drive with a truckload of gear. I think that makes a difference.
    “Everything will be all right in the end... if it's not all right then it's not yet the end”

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,445

    Default Re: migrotory covers in the north?

    You might want to put some styrofoam on the migratory cover in the North. The main reason for an inner cover in the north is to cut down on condensation by having a double ceiling. Some insulation can do the same thing.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Default Re: migrotory covers in the north?

    I find that the migratory covers allow too much rain and melting snow into the hives. I am trying this solution this winter:

    http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b2...e/100_0405.jpg


    Seems to be working to keep excess moisture out while still allowing ventilation and a bit of added warmth on the rare sunny days.These hives are wintering at 3000 feet in the mountains.I am trying some with insulation under the lid, but haven't noticed any difference (yet) .

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    941

    Default Migratory is spelled like this.

    At least a few of us in Oregon do the same as Loggermike.
    Before I cover each pallet, I pull each lid off and scrape the propolis off.
    This also gives me one last peek.
    Then I place a small twig under each lid towards the inside of the pallet for ventilation.
    As for the twigs, I begin the covering process by chopping twigs into 1" peices somewhere between .200" and .100" in dia.
    Cut them ahead of time so you aren't wandering all over the place looking for twigs.
    Not sure that any of this does any good, but can't hurt!
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,290

    Default Re: migrotory covers in the north?

    Heres where I got the idea:

    http://www.foothillshoney.com/index....iary&Itemid=57

    The snow picture looked a lot like a typical winter day around here.My lids all seem to have enough warp to them plus the holes drilled in the boxes that I figure there is plenty of ventilation.The problem comes from melting snow wicking in around the edges of the migratory lids. Doesn't seem as big a problem on the hives wintered in the Sac Valley-they get wet but dry out quickly. Nothing ever dries at this high elevation.
    Last edited by loggermike; 12-27-2010 at 03:37 PM. Reason: clarifying

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