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Thread: What is this?

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Seven Hills, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    16

    Default What is this?

    I was watching my hive this evening. Three times bees emerged with one of these in their clutches The first two dropped off the platform to the ground and wrestled with it before taking off with it. The third time I intercepted the pair and retrieved the prisoner for identification. The prisoner appeared to be dead.





    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by New Bee; 11-27-2010 at 06:03 AM. Reason: tidy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default Re: What is this?

    They look like partially developed pupae of the honey bee. Did you go into the hive lately for inspection? Sometimes brood comb can be inadvertently broken; the pupae exposed and the house or caretaker bees will remove them and take them out of the hive. It might also be some hygenic behavior of the bees that are removing dead or diseased brood.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Seven Hills, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: What is this?

    Haven't touched the brood box since the swarm was put into it in October. so it might be the latter.

    Could robbing bees damage brood comb?



    Last edited by honeyman46408; 11-27-2010 at 01:22 PM. Reason: UNQ

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default Re: What is this?

    I haven't had a lot of experience with robbing to know if that would cause brood to be damaged and be removed.

    It could be the weather; either chilled brood or weather that has been too hot [in Australia ?] for the bees to cool the hive without adequate ventilation in some parts of the brood nest. I don't have my hives where I can observe them all the time, but I see them take out pupae or larvae after inspections. There have been a few times when I have seen partially developed brood left on the landing board before I started my inspections though.

    I don't think it's anything to worry about for now.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    830

    Default Re: What is this?

    To me it is a typically virus infection. Get rid of the mites and eventually the symptoms disappear.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Phelps Co. Missouri USA
    Posts
    856

    Default Re: What is this?

    Is that black spot a mite ? Sorry I don't have my glasses.

    PCM

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default Re: What is this?

    Don't know for sure, but apparently varroa mites have not been found in Australia,...yet. I suppose it could be virus anyway.


    "USDA ARS scientists Dr. John Harbo and Dr. Jeffrey Harris at the Honey Bee Breeding Laboratory in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, have defined and tested a trait of the honeybee which appeared to suppress mite reproduction (SMR). Recently it has been better defined as "varroa sensitive hygiene (VSH)." This is a form of behavior where adult bees remove pupae that have reproductive mites but do not disturb pupae that have mites that produce no progeny." > http://www.beebehavior.com/bee_enemies.php

    It probably wouldn't hurt to do a sugar roll test now and then.

    "The mite occurs in beekeeping countries throughout the world but has not been detected in Australia. There are several surveillance projects for early detection of an incursion of varroa at and near shipping ports. Beekeepers are encouraged to test their own hives for varroa using the simple sugar shake (or roll) test described below." > February 2010:
    http://new.dpi.vic.gov.au/notes/agg/...of-varroa-mite

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