Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 57

Thread: Mite Resistance

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Auburn, Maine, USA
    Posts
    32

    Default Mite Resistance

    What is this bee?
    K bee industry abuzz with mite resistant breed


    By Stefano Ambrogi

    LONDON | Wed Aug 25, 2010 8:19pm BST

    LONDON (Reuters) - A British beekeeper said on Wednesday he may have discovered a strain of honey bee immune to a parasite that has been gradually wiping out populations of the vital insect worldwide.

    Scientists have been trying to find a way to fight the pesticide-resistant Varroa mite.

    But now a retired heating engineer who has spent 18 years searching for a mite-resistant breed may have made a breakthrough.

    Ron Hoskins, 79, from Swindon in southern England, says he has managed to isolate and breed a strain of bees which "groom" one another, removing the mites.

    Since making his discovery, which he said happened by chance, he has been artificially inseminating queen bees in the hope they will establish themselves.
    http://uk.reuters.com/article/idUKTRE67O4SN20100825

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brandon, MS USA
    Posts
    1,585

    Re: Mite Resistance

    Have noted this behavior in several breeds of survivor stock as well as chemically controlled populations... but the effectiveness is still being studied. So far we have noted this behavior in some Italians, Carniolans, and Russians. Slightly more so from the carniolans, but the italians have not been far behind. Good Post by the way!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Auburn, Maine, USA
    Posts
    32

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    Quote Originally Posted by rrussell6870 View Post
    Have noted this behavior in several breeds of survivor stock as well as chemically controlled populations... but the effectiveness is still being studied. So far we have noted this behavior in some Italians, Carniolans, and Russians. Slightly more so from the carniolans, but the italians have not been far behind. Good Post by the way!
    I am wondering what specfic bee they were talking about. I mean that article was fairly new

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brandon, MS USA
    Posts
    1,585

    Re: Mite Resistance

    I would assume it was just a selectively bred strain of a. millifera and a. mellifera millifera (Buckfast and German Black Bee). Anyone have any ideas??? I know I have seen a few people from england, maybe they can let us know what is the most common breed in this gentlemans area...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    SOMERSET, ENGLAND
    Posts
    354

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    Hi
    The bee's are for want of a better word....local mongrels,I have spoken with Ron on a couple of occasions....a very dedicated man regards research on his bee's for varroa tolerance.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brandon, MS USA
    Posts
    1,585

    Re: Mite Resistance

    Thanks beekuk,

    Can you tell us what the most commonly kept bees are in his area? Thanks again.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    SOMERSET, ENGLAND
    Posts
    354

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    Most common bee's....Italians,carniolans,buckfast,amm?,.... Queens from Hawii,Australia,new zealand,Slovenia,Greece,Germany,Belgium....the list goes on....hence i use the word mongrels,athough there are supposedly still some AMM type bee's in small pockets in various parts......no shortage of genetic diversity in the uk thats for sure......Rons aim is to try and spread his particular strain, by providing queens to as many as he can in his locality .....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brandon, MS USA
    Posts
    1,585

    Re: Mite Resistance

    Thanks Pete,

    I will say that of all the breeds that I have worked with amm has always adapted slightly more readily than the others... if only they weren't so prone to robbing and just plain unpleasant. Lol. Next time you speak with him will you ask him to contact me or if you could send me his contact info...I would be interested in funding and staffing his research...but of course I would like to know more about him and his operation first. Thanks.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,118

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    I've never heard of AMM. What are they?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,151

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    Angry mean mothers!

    Well thats' how they used to be in my country, although the breed has mysteriously dissapearedover the last perhaps 20 years.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brandon, MS USA
    Posts
    1,585

    Re: Mite Resistance

    Amm is short for A. Millifera Millifera. Aka...German Black Bee, British Black Bee, etc... slightly smaller than Italians, usually no striping at all, just shiny black, quite aggressive, very prone to robbing, yet very stout and readily adapts to stresses. In the US, they are one of the few strains of feral bee remaining... mostly in the southern LA area but also found in other regions. We have nick-named them "bayou bees" because they are so well established in that area that they actually bred into 400 hives that we have on an island down there throughout the course of twelve years.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,118

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    Thanks. I have Italians. Often I have seen some hives that have a small percentage of smaller blackish bees. So, there are probably a few feral AMMs around me?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brandon, MS USA
    Posts
    1,585

    Re: Mite Resistance

    Possible... it could also be older genetics just coming to the surface here and there. Any hybrids will produce a few mixed traits. Nothing to worry about... just evidence of good diversity. If you notice that a hive has a high percentage of shiny little black bees, or if you notice a hive being robbed, look to see what bees are fleeing the seen when you open it up.. that will tell you if they are mixed with amm.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,118

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    I have noticed that hives with black bees are somewhat more agressive and propolize more. I heard beekeepers say that when a queen is nearing the end of her stored sperm, that she lays eggs that hatch into a higher percentage of black bees.
    Also, I stopped treating about 6 years ago, lost about half of 16 the first year, but bounced back quickly. I seem to get maybe 10 to 20 percent less honey than others in my bee club. But to me it's worth it. Could having some AMM be why mine are surviving without treatment?

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Brandon, MS USA
    Posts
    1,585

    Re: Mite Resistance

    Never can tell... I will say that amm are very effective at controlling shb and have been surviving quite well without treatments for VD. They are an ancient strain and thus if they breed into any other strain that is left to requeen naturally, they will indeed become the dominant genetics in the colony through time. The down sides are (as oldtimer said) they are "mean mothers" lol, and they will rob at the drop of a hat, so any weaker colonies will get wiped out quite quickly. The island where ours are was a test to see of we could use it as one of our isolated breeding grounds...as you can see, it failed. Lol. But they have gone untreated for twelve years and while weaker colonies have been wiped out, the swarms seem to take up residence in the empty boxes and build up brood before food, thus limiting the chance of being robbed... neat bees. Also, they do not produce much surplus at all, however, they do seem to store it more quickly than others....and they build wax like there is no tomorrow...probably because they assume that there may not be one. Lol.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,118

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    Thanks Russell. If I come up with a hive that seems to be mostly AMM, I will use them to draw comb instead of getting honey.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    833

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    Rrussell6870
    <<<slightly smaller than Italians, usually no striping at all, just shiny black, quite aggressive, very prone to robbing, yet very stout and readily adapts to stresses.>>>

    Here a pictures of the “Apis Melifera" http://www.flickr.com/photos/nimou/375473901/
    This is the gentlest bee in my bee yard. I can work without gloves or any other protection the whole day.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany
    Posts
    833

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    Here are even better pictures from the Apis_mellifera

    http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Apis_mellifera

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,151

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    Axtman, your black ones, will likely be carniolan or some hybrid of.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    SOMERSET, ENGLAND
    Posts
    354

    Default Re: Mite Resistance

    We still have some AMM in remote places,some on Scottish islands that do not even have varroa...and more in Ireland. Same as most bee's regarding temperament....some good, some bad.....the worse tempers seem to occur when crossing different strains,and one of the reasons i carry out II, to at least have a little more control,this combined with a couple of remote mating apairys.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads