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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
    Posts
    56

    Default Late season wax moth a cocnern?

    I've been beekeeping since July.

    I was wrapping one of my hives today and noticed two grubs burrowed and cocooned in the top insulation that I'm pretty sure are wax moths. Here's a photo:

    http://mudsongs.org/wax-moth/

    Can anyone tell me if it's wax moth? Iím guessing it is. Second question: What can I do about it at this time of year? I just wrapped the hives for winter. I donít plan on messing with them again until mid-February at the earliest.

    I scrapped away the grubs along with some earwigs. Iíve seen one or two of these grubs in the cracks of the outer cover a few times over the summer, though not in any kind of cocoon. I scrapped them away immediately. Iíve never seen them inside the hive, though I havenít done a full hive inspection since September.

    As far as I can tell, the colony has been healthy and active with a strong population and plenty of winter stores. My feeling is the bees can handle it. Iíd rather leave them alone. I welcome anyoneís advice. Thanks.

    - Phillip

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    saint cloud, florida, USA
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Late season wax moth a cocnern?

    Heya! Yup...I have found these in my hive in the last month or so. They definitely look like wax moth larvae. They burrow through the pollen cells and destroy pretty big sections of comb. My guess is it wouldn't take many to destroy a frame.
    I'm in Florida where it's still warm, so I pull the frames and freeze them for a couple of days. That kills them and SHB larvae, also.
    Good luck!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    St. John's, Newfoundland, Canada
    Posts
    56

    Default Re: Late season wax moth a cocnern?

    "I have found these in my hive in the last month or so. They definitely look like wax moth larvae."

    That's correct. I was busy with work when I posted my question and didn't have time to find the answer on my own. I've since found my answers.

    Yup, it's a wax moth larva. But I don't have to worry about it at this time of the year when the average temperature in my neck of the woods (St. John's, Newfoundland) is below freezing and will be until March. The cold puts a halt to the moth's activity, and I think the colony is strong enough to deal with it on its own in the spring if any more larvae show up in the hive.

    I'm glad I can relax for the winter. I've had enough newbie paranoia about my bees to do for me a while.

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