Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 31 of 31
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Malabar, FL
    Posts
    1,268

    Default Re: Russian management

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    The Russians' only "claim to fame" is mite resistance. Mine died from Varroa mites the same as the others. ..
    Our russians did not fair well as far as mites go either, we ended up having to treat (1st year) or face loosing a bunch of them.....i dont think they are the end all answer to the mite problem. A failed experiment for sure that cost me a lot of money (honey).

    In regards to facing the "other problems" (mites, nosema, absconding, etc)with other races such as Italians, I will gladly face them! I dont see my italians or cordovans swarming or absconding at near the rate the Russians did....nosema and mites....I already said I had to treat my Russians or lose them, so whats the difference....the difference is about 50% more honey in march/april...the Italians won the battle....go yellow bees
    A government large enough to provide everything you need is strong enough to take everything you have. T. Jefferson

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    ALTUS, OKLAHOMA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: Russian management

    I live in Southwestern Oklahoma, very hot in summer and cold in the winter. I have russians and they are the gentlest bees I have ever seen. Most of the time i use no veil or suit. They build very fast, draw out comb like crazy and will fill a super in about a week and a half. Queens are hearty and strong. They do not swarm more than any other bee. They do build a lot of queen cells, but take them down themselves. Highly recommend them and they require almost no management except adding supers and that, I like to do. They do like sugar syrup in the early spring, but really do not need it. They store enough to take them through the winter. I think you will like the russians.

    little john

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,497

    Default Re: Russian management

    Just wondering, but for those who are having trouble managing their Russians....have you tired Vodka to your management technique? For you or the bees.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid. John Wayne

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Knox County, Ohio
    Posts
    203

    Default Re: Russian management

    Little John

    How are they on Mites?

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Malabar, FL
    Posts
    1,268

    Default Re: Russian management

    Quote Originally Posted by alpha6 View Post
    Just wondering, but for those who are having trouble managing their Russians....have you tired Vodka to your management technique? For you or the bees.
    I did add vodka to my managment strategy but found myself stumbling and tripping over pallet corners and I fell over trying to pick up my dropped hive tool After extensive research i found them better managed with Crown Royal.
    A government large enough to provide everything you need is strong enough to take everything you have. T. Jefferson

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Salem, Oregon
    Posts
    942

    Default Russian management

    A long stick with a bucket on the end really helps:

    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...n/DSC00436.jpg

    Although 10 years old, here is some work with russians.
    As far as I know, only one of the participants would ever keep russians now:

    http://www.honeystonecandles.com/beeresearch.htm
    I have exactly ONE hive more than you.
    That makes my opinion beyond question.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Seneca, sc
    Posts
    830

    Default Re: Russian management

    I enjoyed the links, good information.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Munfordville, Ky. U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,246

    Default Re: Russian management

    I really don't see how anything 10 years ago could be applied to todays USDA/RBA bees. They are definetly not the same. Thats why you can get good reports from several that has them. However I believe that some may have to alter their style of beekeeping.
    So much to learn, so little time!!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Palm Bay, FL, USA
    Posts
    2,297

    Default Re: Russian management

    As my son stated above (Peacekeeper) we tried them and found that they are not FL bees; so any experience of ours is related to a warm climate. They build up late, we need them strong by March. They fill the brood nests with honey and swarm at the drop of a hat. Always have swarm cells; just disregard them; they usually tear them down. The real bad thing is that the buggers get mean after the first generation, so be prepared to buy new queens often. I firmly believe that this behavior stems from the Black Bee heritage (AMM bees). For us, a normal day in the beeyard (usually 40-60 hives) meant 80-100 stings, lots, lots worse when pulling honey. I've been working bees since the late 50's, never had bees that mean, and I've had Italians, Caucasians and Carnis, plus all the hybrids you can name. If you live in cold country these may work for you but please keep them out of FL! And like my son said, they still get the mites so no advantage for us.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    ALTUS, OKLAHOMA, U.S.A.
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: Russian management

    No problem what so ever with mites, and I check often. Hives were inspected about two months ago by the state and were in his words "these are in great shape".
    I am so happy with mine that I am going to start raising queens this spring.
    Have I been stung by them, Yes, but since I don't swell pain is about 10 seconds and gone. Usually my fault, except one time right between the eyes for no reason. They are even bringing in pollen and nectar today, they work all the time. I don't know where the pollen and nectar are coming from (no goldenrod this year), but they are linning up bringing it in, almost rust colored pollen.
    I highly recommend these bees and maybe mine will get nasty, but I am already past the second generation and no problem. No problem taking off supers. I turned 60 today and if I had nasty bees I would gas them and get some more, but they would be russians also.

    little john

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Enfield,Ct.
    Posts
    469

    Default Re: Russian management

    Well,my Russian mutts have worked for me after 6 yrs w/no treatments.
    Dead Italians don't make any honey.
    My winter losses over that time have gone from 40%to about 25%. Mostly mite pressure. Small clusters starving inches from honey. I average 15 producing hives per year.
    Italians do make more honey it seems but then they keep raising brood and consume it during a dearth and need more to overwinter.
    You can tell the end of the flow when the Russian queens slow down their egglaying.
    I feed patties and 1-1 syrup in late Feb to stimulate and visit weekly in May to make splits with swarm cells if I find them.(N.Central CT). My yards also have a lot of early tree pollen.I super early(Dandylion or just after) with 3 supers and no excluder. Some will swarm anyway but will still make honey in the fall ( my best flow).
    Temperment is variable. Veil and t-shirt during the flow. Gloves and suit pulling supers during a dearth.

    Jack

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads