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Thread: Freezing combs

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Scotts Valley, CA
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    Default Freezing combs

    I just saw that someone is actually freezing their old comb rather than trying to keep it aerated and dry. Does this work? If so this would solve a lot of problems for us this year. Thanks for any info you can give me.


    Joy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Easton, NY
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Freezing combs

    If you have the freezer space it works. It is a good idea to seal it in plastic before you put it in the freezer, this way when you take it out of the freezer and let it get to room temp before opening it won't get all wet with condensation. I have no problem freezing even full frames of honey as long as I seal them up and let them thaw a day or 2 before taking them out of the plastic. I have a big freezer that can fit almost 100 med frames loose or 5 supers with the frames in them, but wish I still wish I had more freezer space. It is a great way to keep your comb away from critters and bugs.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Scotts Valley, CA
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    Default Re: Freezing combs

    Thanks, we have the space! I would prefer this in terms of protecting the comb from wax moths! Thanks, thanks, thanks! Did I say thanks?

    Joy

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lunenburg,N.S. Canada
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    281

    Default Re: Freezing combs

    When putting combs of honey into a freezer, wouldn't it still granulate? I put two buckets of honey I extracted that was a little high in moisture content into my freezer last fall and when I pulled it out this spring it looked like perfectly creamed honey
    I have four deeps full of capped honey that I don't want to extract plus a couple of boxes with frames full of pollen. It would be great to just be able to store it somehow so I could just drop in frames next spring but I am worried the honey will granulate in the frames and the pollen will go mouldy. I am actually thinking of just throwing the boxes of honey on some hives even though they probably don't need it.

    Perry

  5. #5
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    Sep 2010
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    Scotts Valley, CA
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    Default Re: Freezing combs

    Well we don't have any honey, we got robbed this season, but I don't want the comb to go to waste.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Default Re: Freezing combs

    maybe you should just extract it?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Freezing combs

    Quote Originally Posted by PerryBee View Post
    I have four deeps full of capped honey that I don't want to extract
    Why do you have four deeps with honey? Seems to me that you should have a deep or two for brood, a queen separator that you remove in the fall and then mediums for honey. four deeps for honey seems strange.

    Is there a reason you did this?

    Joy
    Last edited by Barry; 11-05-2010 at 07:41 AM. Reason: excessive quoting

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Lunenburg,N.S. Canada
    Posts
    281

    Default Re: Freezing combs

    Sorry, I guess I could have have been more articulate.
    During the summer whenever my hives looked crowded I would pull 2 or 3 frames of capped honey and drop in frames of foundation in the brood area to give them room (sort of checkerboarding). I managed to save up about 6 deeps worth and this fall I would drop frames in any hives that I thought were light (rather than feed syrup).
    Turns out a lot of my hives are doing OK so I ended up with the left over deeps with capped honey. I do not extract deeps, only medium supers. I have no way of knowing if the deeps have been in contact with meds as they are all I use in brood chambers. I have seen too many frames of honey collected in deeps swapped out with frames from brood chambers because of brood in the honey super frames. This happens even though there may have been meds in those brood chamber frames.
    The hassle of running two seperate size boxes is worth the peace of mind it gives me knowing that I can't make that mistake.
    This is just my personal choice, I am not saying one way is right or wrong, and yes it would be nice to not use any meds but for now that is not a realistic option.

    Perry

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Easton, NY
    Posts
    58

    Default Re: Freezing combs

    Quote Originally Posted by PerryBee View Post
    When putting combs of honey into a freezer, wouldn't it still granulate? I put two buckets of honey I extracted that was a little high in moisture content into my freezer last fall and when I pulled it out this spring it looked like perfectly creamed honey
    Perry
    I can only speak from my own experiences and have only stored full frames of honey for 2 or 3 months. I would pull a few full supers, freeze them and then thaw them out when I was ready to extract later in the season. The frames to me seemed to be in the same condition when they came out as when I put them in.

    I have heard others on this forum say that they take their bottled honey, put it in the freezer and take it out as they need it. They were saying this prevented the honey from crystlizing, but I have yet to try this. I have about 100 bottles of fall honey I need to reliquify and I was hoping this was true so I don't have keep soaking jars in hot water to be able to sell them.

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