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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lamont, Florida, USA
    Posts
    181

    Default A Taste of Honey

    I checked my hives this past weekend (North Florida) and sneaked a taste of the fall wildflower honey the bees have been making...it was...uhhh...how to say it??? Different. My spring honey was so delicate and sweet and light - a non-distinct flavor...and so good. This was a little darker, and had a very distinct, somewhat molasses taste. I can't think of the word to describe it...it seemed somewhat familiar but can't figure it out. Bottom line - it was not to my taste. The rest of the family reacted pretty much the same. Our bees have been foraging all over our anise-hyssop, tickseed, golden rod, and basil for the past couple of weeks. Would any of those make a rather unpleasant, strong taste of honey???

    beecuz

    "...for breath is sweeter taken even as the last in places dear...
    with gardens, fields and dogwood trees...in forest stands of bamboo shoots, of ginger root and honey bees..."

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    unionville,mi, USA
    Posts
    60

    Default Re: A Taste of Honey

    Do you have buckwheat growing in your area. Buckwheat honey is dark and has a very strong taste. Some of the books that I have read suggest not mixing buckwheat honey any stronger than 20% or else it can be overpowering.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    YANCEY CO., NC
    Posts
    639

    Default Re: A Taste of Honey

    goldenrod to me is best left in the hives I don't like it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lamont, Florida, USA
    Posts
    181

    Default Re: A Taste of Honey

    Yes, I am wondering if it might be Goldenrod. I just sampled a taste of Buckwheat and that's not what we have. I also sampled Saw Palmetto and Gallberry and that's not what we have either. I have never tasted honey from Goldenrod before so I can't be sure. If I can find a jar of it somewhere I'll add it to my now growing collection of honey samples.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    EL Paso, Wisconsin
    Posts
    115

    Default Re: A Taste of Honey

    Beecuz, from your description of your floral sources, it probably is goldenrod. Goldenrod has a very distinct aroma and flavor (bite) to it; it can range in color from medium to dark, and it will crystallize quicker than other honeys. I have heard many beeks describe goldenrod in many ways, from dirty socks to, okay molasses! When you opened your hive, did you think there was an unfamiliar or funny smell?

    My first fall harvest as a beekeeper, I opened some of my hives and thought, aw fooey, what smells bad in here, but the girls were busy and happy. I had my mentor come take a look, because I expected the worst. He laughed heartily and told me it was goldenrod.

    I typically harvest before my girls can pack away a lot of goldenrod in my supers. They pack it away in the deeps for winter. You can extract it separately or just blend it with what you have. Some customers like it, some don’t, and some buy it for their allergies.

    Over the years, I learned about my floral sources and bloom times. I paid attention to the flowers my bees were visiting, this helped me gain more knowledge about the honey my girls were producing and when.

    If you can find an ‘old timer’, they can tell you for sure! Let us know if you find out!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,675

    Default Re: A Taste of Honey

    just came from florida. spanish pepper and melaleuca are likey suspects.

    deknow

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    North Bend, OH, USA
    Posts
    272

    Default Re: A Taste of Honey

    Personally I love the darker stuff. Around here its goldenrod, thistle, Ironweed sunchokes, mixed with a little late season alf-alfa. Not super dark but enough a mix that customers ask for it as much as Black Locust. We just call it Autumn Honey.

    This eyar we harvested ZERO and let the bees have all of it. Normally we do a small amount 300 to 800 pounds. This year nothing. 20 weeks with only .10" rainfall.
    Richard
    Carriage House Farm, North Bend, Ohio

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