View Poll Results: Will you continue to purchase packages/nucs from southern GA

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  • Yes

    28 49.12%
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    18 31.58%
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    11 19.30%
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Thread: AHB in Georgia

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia, MS, USA
    Posts
    632

    Default AHB in Georgia

    It was reported yesterday that AHB were found in Georgia. What will that mean to the Queen and Package industry in Georgia?

    Johnny
    "Suppose you were an idiot and suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself." - Mark Twain

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Loganville/Greensboro, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    241

    Default Re: AHB in Georgia

    Where is that being reported? There was an unfortunate incident where an old man died but he was only stung about 100 times. Ahb attacks have 1000s of stings. My Italian mutts have stung me more than 100 times in one day when being moved. They are not ahb just a little grumpy. Lol Haven't heard of ahb here. Will be sad if its true.
    Buffalo Lick Farm & Nursery
    http://www.buffalolick.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Atlanta Ga
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: AHB in Georgia

    Frmo WSBTV website.


    Officials: Killer Bees Responsible For Georgia Man's Death
    Posted: 9:23 am EDT October 21, 2010

    ATLANTA -- Officials with the Georgia Department of Agriculture confirmed that Africanized honeybees were responsible for the death of an elderly man in Dougherty County last week.

    “This is the first record of Africanized honeybees in Georgia,” said Agriculture Commissioner Tommy Irvin.

    Africanized honeybees are a hybrid of African and European honeybees. Because of their extremely defensive nature regarding their nest (also referred to as a colony or hive), they are sometimes called “killer bees.” Large numbers of them sometimes sting people or livestock with little provocation.

    “Georgia beekeepers are our first and best line of defense against these invaders. They are the ones who will be able to monitor and detect any changes in bee activity,” said Irvin.

    “The Georgia Department of Agriculture is going to continue its trapping and monitoring of bee swarms to try to find where any Africanized honeybees are,” said Irvin.

    Authorities say 73-year-old Curtis Davis died Oct. 11 in Dougherty County. Authorities say he was cleaning up burning brush with a tractor when he hit a beehive. He was stung over 100 times.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Blount county,Hayden, Alabama
    Posts
    38

    Default Re: AHB in Georgia

    I hope this is just a fluke. I live in north central Alabama and figure that if they are in Georgia then they must be in Mississippi, Alabama and potentially Tennessee. This will make for big changes in the way we all do business and where we keep are colonies and I imagine who will allow us to keep colonies on their property.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Loganville/Greensboro, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    241

    Default Re: AHB in Georgia

    Id like to know if this has been confirmed by genetic testing or if this is just some yahoo at the department of AG angling for some grant $ not ready to accept the news.
    Buffalo Lick Farm & Nursery
    http://www.buffalolick.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Saucier, MS
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: AHB in Georgia

    Quote from Kim Flottum's CATCH THE BUZZ newsletter:
    "Because Africanized honeybees look almost identical to European honeybees, the bees from the Dougherty County incident had to be tested to accurately ascertain they were the Africanized strain. The Georgia Department of Agriculture sent samples of the bees to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services which has the capability to do FABIS (fast African bee identification system) testing and the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture identification test (the complete morphometrics test) to confirm the bees’ identity."

    They were confirmed as AHB.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Loganville/Greensboro, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    241

    Default Re: AHB in Georgia

    I guess we'll be praying for a cold winter then.
    Buffalo Lick Farm & Nursery
    http://www.buffalolick.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
    Location
    DuPage County, Illinois USA
    Posts
    9,432

    Default Re: AHB in Georgia

    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalolick View Post
    Id like to know if this has been confirmed by genetic testing or if this is just some yahoo at the department
    Yeah, it's a USDA yahoo.
    I don't know what the big surprise is. You're down there in the southern states so surely you didn't think you'd escape it. Smell the coffee!
    Regards, Barry

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Loganville/Greensboro, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    241

    Default Re: AHB in Georgia

    Well I did expect we'd escape it since we have several days each winter with lows in the teens. For what it's worth I'm still suspicious of the diagnosis. Why is suggesting a government agency might lie to stoke public fear and generate more funding for themselves worthy of some rolly eyes?
    Buffalo Lick Farm & Nursery
    http://www.buffalolick.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    4,137

    Default Re: AHB in Georgia

    Quote Originally Posted by Buffalolick View Post
    Id like to know if this has been confirmed by genetic testing or if this is just some yahoo at the department of AG angling for some grant $ not ready to accept the news.
    Here's Kim Flottums Email.

    This ezine is also available online at http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-20...5.archive.html


    CATCH THE BUZZ






    Africanized Honeybees Found in Georgia


    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE October 21, 2010






    More on the Story Released Here Yesterday










    Entomological tests have confirmed that Africanized honeybees were responsible for the death of an elderly man in Dougherty County last week. News reports say the man accidentally disturbed a feral colony of bees with his bulldozer and that he received more than 100 stings.






    “This is the first record of Africanized honeybees in Georgia,” said Agriculture Commissioner Tommy Irvin.






    Africanized honeybees are a hybrid of African and European honeybees. Because of their extremely defensive nature regarding their nest (also referred to as a colony or hive), they are sometimes called “killer bees.” Large numbers of them sometimes sting people or livestock with little provocation.






    The Africanized honeybee and the familiar European honeybee (Georgia’s state insect) look the same and their behavior is similar in some respects. Each bee can sting only once, and there is no difference between Africanized honeybee venom and that of a European honeybee. However, Africanized honeybees are less predictable and more defensive than European honeybees. They are more likely to defend a wider area around their nest and respond faster and in greater numbers than European honeybees.






    Africanized honeybees first appeared in the U.S. in Texas in 1990. Since then they have spread to New Mexico, Arizona, California, Nevada, Utah, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, Florida and now Georgia. Entomologists and beekeepers have been expecting the arrival of these bees in Georgia for several years. There has been an established breeding population in Florida since 2005.






    Because Africanized honeybees look almost identical to European honeybees, the bees from the Dougherty County incident had to be tested to accurately ascertain they were the Africanized strain. The Georgia Department of Agriculture sent samples of the bees to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services which has the capability to do FABIS (fast African bee identification system) testing and the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture identification test (the complete morphometrics test) to confirm the bees’ identity.










    “Georgia beekeepers are our first and best line of defense against these invaders. They are the ones who will be able to monitor and detect any changes in bee activity,” said Commissioner Irvin.






    “The Georgia Department of Agriculture is going to continue its trapping and monitoring of bee swarms to try to find where any Africanized honeybees are,” said Commissioner Irvin. “We also want to educate people about what to do in case they encounter a colony of Africanized honeybees. Georgians can visit our website for more information. The University of Georgia Cooperative Extension Service has a publication on Africanized honeybees that is available online (http://pubsadmin.caes.uga.edu/files/pdf/B%201290_2.PDF) or at Extension offices.”


    .


    Don’t Forget!


    Hives of European honeybees managed by beekeepers play an important role in our lives. These bees are necessary for the pollination of many crops. One-third of our diet relies on honeybee pollination.






    People can coexist with the Africanized honeybee by learning about the bee and its habits, supporting beekeeping efforts and taking a few precautions.
    Dan

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Greensburg, Ky.
    Posts
    1,148

    Default Re: AHB in Georgia

    Thanks wolfpenfarm, You learn something new everyday! I just read this online, link down below. It states that the average length of a honey bee wing is 9mm or more and anything less then 9mm is considered to be AHB. I have no idea if there is any truth to it or not but thought someone might know.

    http://acwm.co.la.ca.us/scripts/ahb.htm

  12. #12

    Default Africanized bees in GA

    I guess we can join the club now.
    Recently there was a man killed by honey bees in southwest GA. It turns out that those bees were tested and are Africanized.
    http://www.wctv.tv/APNews/headlines/...ction=comments
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Loganville/Greensboro, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    241

    Default Re: Africanized bees in GA

    Maybe the fall line will protect us Dan!
    Buffalo Lick Farm & Nursery
    http://www.buffalolick.com

  14. #14

    Default Re: Africanized bees in GA

    I hope so Buffalo....
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Carrboro, North Carolina
    Posts
    55

    Default Re: Africanized bees in GA

    If you look at the natural (not beekeeper maintained) distribution of AHB in Argentina, they can establish themselves up to about 32-33 degrees South Latitude.

    The equivalent latitude in the US would be Atlanta. Higher altitude (like Atlanta) and winter humidity might move that line to the south. Some AHB have survived as far south as 39 degrees latitude in Argentina, which would map to Washington DC. AHB have already made it to 39 degrees North Latitude in Nevada, but that is a dryer climate.

    That said, I have seen maps based on Argentina that predict AHB as far north as southern Iowa and New York State. Of course, a big factor is the presence of numerous hives of European bees to compete with the AHB. And in cooler climates theAHB become less aggressive.
    If a colony splits in the wild, who is there to walk away?

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    DRY BRANCH GA.
    Posts
    92

    Default Re: Africanized bees in GA

    Well I don't know if this is normal are not but I'm starting to wonder if I have killer bee's!I have two hive and yes I am in Ga.that I started this year and all year I have been able to sit within 8 feet from my hive and observe the hive .But that is no longer possible,if I come within 8 feet now I need a suit is this normal this time of year? it's possible that there is some robbing going on that I can not seem to stop, the bees are all over the front of both hives which are 2 acres apart and are not acting normal at all.bees are also all over the place I mean front door back door all around the house shop ect.also don't let no body tell you that a hive beetle can't fit through # 8 screen wire.I pulled out my oil tray and they were 150 dead bees in the bottom of it .I'm wondering if this is part of there strange behavior?If any body can give me some advice it would be greatly appreciated....

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA, USA
    Posts
    520

    Default Africanized Bees Confirmed in Georgia

    I guess it was inevitable but am sorry to hear it, just the same. I'm wondering now if and when they'll reach N GA.
    See links below for the details.

    http://www.ajc.com/news/killer-honey...ns-687600.html

    http://georgiafaces.caes.uga.edu/ind...ory&PK_ID=3954

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Covington, Ga, USA
    Posts
    1,549

    Default Re: Africanized Bees Confirmed in Georgia

    Good news is they think they were transported in.....lets all hope so
    "You laugh at me because I am different, but I laugh at you because you are all the same."

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    1,398

    Default AHBs in GA - Man dead

    Haven't been on the site in a while so I don't know if this has been posted already.

    If true, it makes me want to rethink purchasing packages/nucs from southern GA apiaries. What do ya'll think?



    Man Dies After Killer Bee Attack
    Africanized Bees Confirmed To Have Caused Death
    POSTED: 12:11 pm EDT October 21, 2010
    UPDATED: 12:40 pm EDT October 21, 2010
    Email Print
    Comments (11)ALBANY, Ga. -- Agriculture officials say a Georgia man died after being swarmed by killer bees.

    Georgia Agriculture Commission Tommy Irvin said Thursday that tests show Africanized "killer" bees were responsible for the death of 73-year-old Curtis Davis in Dougherty County.

    Davis was stung hundreds of times when his bulldozer hit an old wooden porch post where the bees had built a giant hive. The insects swarmed him.

    Irvin said the tests showed the insects were a hybrid of African and European honeybees, sometimes called "killer bees." The bees are extremely defensive, swarm in greater numbers than typical European honeybees and sting with little provocation.

    The first swarm of Africanized bees in the U.S. was discovered outside the small Texas town of Hidalgo in 1990. They have gradually spread to other states including northern Florida several years ago, but have not been previously confirmed in Georgia, according to the Georgia Beekeepers Association.

    State officials said they will continue trapping and monitoring bee swarms to identify Africanized honeybees.

    A web posting by the Georgia Beekeepers Association said that they are “confidant that (Africanized bees) will at least reach the Atlanta area.”
    De Colores,
    Ken

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Alexandria, VA
    Posts
    370

    Default Re: AHBs in GA - Man dead

    I can't really say from a beekeeper point of view, but just looking at it--it was one case, with a wild swarm. Wouldn't there be a MUCH lower chance of an AHB package coming your way? I mean, for one, the guy shaking the package would probably notice (would they care enough to cull the package?), and two, aren't most breeding apiaries surrounded by their own drone producing hives? Even if a queen mated with a small fraction of AHB drones of her total drone count, would that affect the temperment of the entire hive?

    Mostly just asking rather than saying, but to change an entire operation off of a single unrelated incident seems a little overboard.

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