Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    4,217

    Default Energy Consumption Chart

    The following chart is copied from the book "Observation Hives" by Webster and Caron.

    I thought I would scan and post it for others to see.

    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Munfordville, Ky. U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,245

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    Good post, thank you
    Made me realize that you can sorta know how much of their stores are gone by the number of cold days you have. In other words if you are having a cold winter they will need more stores. For those that have snow cover their hives it will take less stores because snow is very good insulator
    So much to learn, so little time!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Spencer, MA, USA
    Posts
    2,453

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    That's why those that winter their bees indoors keep the temp around 40 F. Least stores eaten.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Seneca, sc
    Posts
    829

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    Good post.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bonn, Germany
    Posts
    235

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    If it's too cold, bees will probably start breeding.

    Did the authors observe this phenomenon?

  6. #6

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    It also indicates that the better the hive is at retaining heat, the less bees have to work to maintain a certain in-hive temperature. Which also reduces the amount of stores consumed to maintain said heat level.
    No, I am NOT a bee "Keeper". Anything I post is just my opinion. Take it easy and think for yourself.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Clifford Township, PA
    Posts
    2,432

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    Quote Originally Posted by sjj View Post
    If it's too cold, bees will probably start breeding.

    Did the authors observe this phenomenon?
    That's something I've never heard. Counter-intuitive. Did you mean "too warm?"

    Wayne

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    153

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    So 5 deg C = 40 deg F and is the temp that Bees cluster and eat the least amount of honey.

    Any higher and they start carrying out hive duties and need more honey to fuel their activity.

    So if it's 40 deg F outside the hive but the hive is REALLY well insulated, do the bees do more hive activity?
    Does that low point in the graph of the metabolic rate of the hive move if it is well insulated?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Fort Gay, WV, USA
    Posts
    2,057

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    Quote Originally Posted by Joes_bees View Post
    So 5 deg C = 40 deg F and is the temp that Bees cluster and eat the least amount of honey.

    Any higher and they start carrying out hive duties and need more honey to fuel their activity.

    So if it's 40 deg F outside the hive but the hive is REALLY well insulated, do the bees do more hive activity?
    Does that low point in the graph of the metabolic rate of the hive move if it is well insulated?
    Now that's a question that i'd like to know the answer to myself as well. I mean those that use the Poly hive bodies are insulating their bees from the cold and heat. Although the hive maintains the temp in the cluster and isn't worried about the air around it, with those types of hives the heat would start to accumulate and allow them to move easier, etc. Then there is also people that use thick hive bodies made from 1.5 inch wood, more insulation value would mean warmer in winter, cooler in summer.

    Interesting...
    Thomas Bartram

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    8,899

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    A hive that is "really well insulated" will have smaller temperature swings than a poorly insulated hive. To the extent that the movement of radiated cluster heat is slowed down by the hive insulation, the insulated hive is likely to be warmer than a non/poorly insulated hive. And a warmer colony is likely to be more active. If you follow Ian's posts about his indoor wintering setup, once the (non-heated) bee storage building temperatures climb much above 40 degrees F, he really has no option but to move the hives back outside.

    If we go much further down this road, very soon we will be back at ...
    Bees Only Heat the Cluster, Not the Hive?



    ... is it that time already? ...
    Graham
    . . . . . . "those who want to see, can see". - - [Oldtimer - 2016]

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    13,238

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    Quote Originally Posted by BeeCurious View Post
    I thought I would scan and post it for others to see.
    Now all that is needed is to superimpose a graph on the amount of energy consumption for growing the same pound of bees. Has anyone done that as a comparison? From my experience overwintering consumption is nothing compared to spring buildup and spring build up can be supplemented so why all the worry?
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    13,238

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    Quote Originally Posted by drlonzo View Post
    Now that's a question that i'd like to know the answer to myself as well.
    One of my properties is in a Polish town and we know how we like to make fun of Polish people but my tenant puts his refrigerator on the porch that is unheated. What do you think the insulation in that refrigerate is doing on a porch through the winter in Upstate NY? My guess is not much. How do you think this Polish guy is making out on his electric bill? I think he is no dummy.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,346

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    Good chart!

    Stores usage will increase slightly with temperatures above 40 F. You will notice, the slope of the energy usage increase below this point is much sharper per degree temperature change than it is per degree temperature change above 40 F.
    Your decision regarding hive insulation value in your particular circumstances could be done with fair accuracy on the basis of degree days over the period from end of foraging till beginning of foraging. Not many will be deciding on that basis but our hunches if they are correct should not be too out of whack with what degree days would predict.

    For me at 46 degrees N. insulation is an easy decision and it also should be if you are, say, in Georgia! Whether you have Carniolan or Russians rather than Italian bees is probably more important part of the decision. With carni bees my hive weight will drop only a bit over 10 lbs from mid Oct. till the end of March then use 25 lbs in March and April when they start brooding again.
    Frank

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Jefferson Co, TX
    Posts
    1,506

    Default Re: Energy Consumption Chart

    Crofter - Like that information on honey use through the winter. Interesting. Maybe one day I will set something up to monitor it.
    Started 9/13, building slowly, not trying the no treatment anymore

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads