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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Chickamauga, Walker County, Georgia
    Posts
    285

    Default Re: Why do people start/ leave beekeeping...

    Bees are a wonderful way to experience nature ... and honey!

    It's a fairly uncomplicated hobby unless you make it so. Once you've got the hives up and running, the bees really do know how to take care of themselves.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Guilford, CT
    Posts
    65

    Default Re: Why do people start/ leave beekeeping...

    I started because I was interested in the the "plight of the honey bee". I am hooked by the intelligenge & engineering capability of an insect. We have other livestock, but I always know where each individual animal is, except for my girls. I think I will always be in awe of a "bug" that knows so much more than I could ever learn

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default Re: Why do people start/ leave beekeeping...

    Not sure (can't remember) what the first thought was, I know we where in a self sufficient mode back then, big garden, kids born at home, home schooling that sort of stuff. I bought two books, as this was pre internet and cell phones, The ABC-XYZ's of Beekeeping and The How To Do it Book of Beekeeping and I found a much older fella that had 500 hives. First time in a beeyard I fell madly in love with them, that was mid 80's. Got out when we moved from a small town back to the big city. Got back into them after they began to show up in the news and I was reminded how much I love them. Now with such a good swarm year I have 10 hives sitting in my neighborhood backyard.....and love it! Oh yea, I don't care for honey much either!! 8)
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Roy, Wa
    Posts
    1,448

    Default Re: Why do people start/ leave beekeeping...

    I started beekeeping in part, because I like wood working and wanted to build and decorate the box's. For years people had been telling me "I can't believe you don't have honeybees, you have everything else" (Talking about farm stuff)

    Considering state of the economy and other things I won't get into, like Monsanto, GMO's, etc all the topics that will get you into trouble here on beesourse if you talk about them, beekeeping seemed like the next step in small family farming.
    In my opinion our food chain is a ticking time bomb and self sufficiency is one way you can prepare for what ever may happen in our potentially dangerous world we live in today.
    Skills in Food production, including Learning to manage hives may prove to be a valuable resource should things really turn ugly.


    I like things that are a challenge and that keep you on your toes. Bee keeping is very educational and fascinating. As easy as a few simple steps to managing your hives or getting down to the scientific level, your choice of degree of difficulty.

    I was not prepared for the addictive properties of managing bees however. Now I am a just another junkie with sticky stuff on everything I own.
    I love my elk burgers and fresh green beans, but tasting your own home grown honey is really something magical.
    Besides my bee sting therapy might keep my fingers from getting all twisted with arthritis like my mom's


  5. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    lee county, fl, usa
    Posts
    742

    Default Re: Why do people start/ leave beekeeping...

    I have been interested in honeybees since I was a kid. As an adult, I would ask questions of beekeepers at farrmer's markets but as I lived in a Wisconsin city that didn't allow backyard beekeeping, and not hearing about associations until a few years before my move to Florida, it just sounded like too much work.

    When I moved to Florida I started noticing beehives in my area and looked online for an association. I went to my first meeting in December '09, just months after my move here. Started reading, and planning on 2 hives in spring. The March meeting, the pres who is a commercial beekeeper, donated about 5 queens for raffle. I bought 6 raffle tickets and my first 3 tickets won me queens. I had no hives, no place to put them yet as I was living with my son's family at the time. Pres said, instead of 3 queens I get a box of bees. He gave me the name of a farmer who wanted bees/beekeeper on his land and that was my start. I was destined.

    By the end of summer I had 4 hives and I wanted more, totally hooked. I also had a good mentor, that's important I think. Now I have 12 hives and 3 nuks. I'm in my 3rd year. I love all aspects, the honey for me and my family, extracting, the wax for candles, selling it, working and learning from the bees. I'm going to start pollen and propolis collection. My hives are chemical free.

    I like doing cut outs and swarm catches too. Most of my hives are at the farm but I do have 3 nuks at home. If I ever stop it will be because I can't physically do it anymore. I'm already recruiting my grandkids, age 8 and 4.
    "Rule Three of beekeeping...Never cease to feel wonder" Laurie R. King--
    March 2010; +/- 30 hives, TF

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