Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    3,651

    Default Thymol use in syrup... a historical note

    Allan C. Waine's book "Background to Beekeeping" 1955, has the earliest reference to the use of thymol in syrup that I know of.

    He writes:

    "The recommended quantity of thymol is two-fifths of a grain per pound of sugar used. A convenient way of measuring this is to get from a chemist a 2% solution of thymol in surgical spirit and to add one teaspoonful of this to every pint of syrup."




    I haven't done the math, but it might be interesting to know how Waine's mixture compares to Randy Oliver's:
    http://www.scientificbeekeeping.com/...ask=view&id=45
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,976

    Default Re: Thymol use in syrup... a historical note

    Interesting. And what was Waine's reason for using Thymol in 1955?

    Adam

    One thing I find interesting, is it seems that no matter how far I go back in history, people are always talking about "the terrible state of bees and beekeeping"...

    Ever notice that? Has there ever been a good period?

    Adam

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,304

    Default Re: Thymol use in syrup... a historical note

    My 1946 edition of "Honey Farming" by R.O.B. Manley, an English commercial beekeeper, has instructions on mixing thymol in syrup to prevent spoilage.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    3,651

    Default Re: Thymol use in syrup... a historical note

    Quote Originally Posted by Adam Foster Collins View Post
    Interesting. And what was Waine's reason for using Thymol in 1955?

    He says that "Thymol is an antiseptic and has the power of preserving sugar solution against mould and fermentation indefinitely" .
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    SOMERSET, ENGLAND
    Posts
    337

    Default Re: Thymol use in syrup... a historical note

    Quote Originally Posted by loggermike View Post
    My 1946 edition of "Honey Farming" by R.O.B. Manley, an English commercial beekeeper, has instructions on mixing thymol in syrup to prevent spoilage.
    Thats a good book Mike......it was ROB Manley that pioneered this thymol use.

    R.O.B Manley propagated the idea of using thymol in syrup intended for winter feeding in order to prevent fermentation and the growth of mould. Manley's thymol recipe has also proven useful in controlling Varroa mites[5].

    Manley's recipe has become a standard and even if the requirement is for a stronger solution, this is often specified as '3x Manley strength' or '4x Manley strength'[6]. His original recipe was one ounce of thymol crystals dissolved in five fluid ounces of surgical spirit to make the stock solution. Then half a fluid ounce of this mixture was added to 1 Cwt (112 lbs) of sugar, which he dissolved in 7 imperial gallons (8.75 US Gal.) of water for direct use as winter feed.[7]

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R.O.B._Manley

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    3,651

    Default Re: Thymol use in syrup... a historical note

    Quote Originally Posted by loggermike View Post
    My 1946 edition of "Honey Farming" by R.O.B. Manley, an English commercial beekeeper, has instructions on mixing thymol in syrup to prevent spoilage.

    That's good!

    Waine was also a Brit. He mentions another Manley book, "Bee-keeping in Britain".
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Bonn, Germany
    Posts
    123

    Wink Re: Thymol use in syrup... a historical note

    Quote Originally Posted by beekuk View Post
    ... His original recipe was one ounce of thymol crystals dissolved in five fluid ounces of surgical spirit to make the stock solution. Then half a fluid ounce of this mixture was added to 1 Cwt (112 lbs) of sugar, which he dissolved in 7 imperial gallons (8.75 US Gal.) of water for direct use as winter feed.[7] ...
    I find this piece of text terrible to understand.
    I use a metric unit of mass, weight and capacity. SI-International System of Units.

    Can you translate this text using grams and milliliters?

    Sincerely
    Johann

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    SOMERSET, ENGLAND
    Posts
    337

    Default Re: Thymol use in syrup... a historical note

    Try this............... However 30 gm thymol dissolved in 150 ml of surgical spirit will give a solution of the same strength and the figures are both more manageable and more easily remembered.

    The stock solution is added to syrup at the rate of one teaspoon to a three gallon (imperial) quantity of syrup. This converts to 5 ml of stock solution in 13.5 litres, which is not a brilliant way of describing it, but the final strength is not critical. I have several plastic 'jerry' cans that hold 15 litres and I use 1, 2, 3 or 4 teaspoons of concentrate according to the strength that I require.
    http://www.dave-cushman.net/bee/thymolx1.html

    I use a similar mix,but emulsify it with lecithin to give an even mix,instead of the oil floating on top the syrup,also use isopropyl alcohol instead of surgical spirit.
    Last edited by Barry; 10-01-2010 at 07:21 AM.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads