Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Pell City,Alabama,USA
    Posts
    290

    Default Experience with Apiguard.

    Used Apiguard for the first time this week and the hives are tearing out their brood. I suspect its probably not killing the brood but has whipped them into a cleaning frenzy and they are throwing it all out. They are not however throwing out pollen; but rather still bringing it in. Product was applied to 1.5 to 2.5 story hives at 5 pm, bottom entrance fully open, temps around 91 degrees. I am concerned they are tearing out the winter brood. Mite levels appear to be relatively low just saw them for the first time last week in drone brood.
    I have in mind to feed them one week into the treatment to encourage the queens to lay; then my concern is that when I apply the second treatment they'll start all over again.
    What has your experience been with this product?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Batesville, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    107

    Default Re: Experience with Apiguard.

    i do not use when forecast is for 90+. there is a little extra bearding but that is all. (usually put on Sep 25 here in North AR.)

    see lots of dead mites in the trays below the hives.

    There is, at times, a definite thymol odor around the hives.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Experience with Apiguard.

    In previous years I've had similar experiences with ApiGuard. I've also seen queen supercedures that appeared to be triggered by its application during periods of elevated temperatures. I now use half a dose, with applications spaced one week apart and it seems less disruptive.

    From the manufacturer's website:
    At temperatures above 25C (77F) it is possible to use a half-dose of Apiguard and get a very good mite kill. Use 2 doses of 25g Apiguard, one week apart instead of 2 x 50g at two weeks apart. A third 25g dose is sometimes used after the second week where mite infestations are high.
    When it is very hot, the thymol sublimes faster from the gel and the bees are more active moving the Apiguard around. Both these factors increase the effectiveness of the treatment and less product is needed. Make sure the hive entrance is not restricted, allowing thymol vapour to escape.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Pell City,Alabama,USA
    Posts
    290

    Default Re: Experience with Apiguard.

    I have been in touch with the manufacturer and they tell me my experience is not the norm. He said that most likely the brood I saw removed was directly above the tray and that the bees associated the brood with the thymol and removed it. He did suggest placing the tray on top of the two deep or splitting the treatment 25g between hive bodies and 25g on top of 2nd deep, or using 25g treatments one week apart. I treated another yard a couple days after the first and placed the tray on top of the 2nd deep with an empty super on top. Went back the next morning and they where ignoring it. I have asked but he has yet to tell me if the mites are killed by the vapor or if they have to come in contact with the product. Next time I'll split treatment 25g and 25g between and above boxes spread on a piece of 4x4 cardboard. He also said to be sure to stir the product good if using bulk tub. Live and learn they say, the directions can't provide experience....

  5. #5

    Default Re: Experience with Apiguard.

    Quote Originally Posted by wdcrkapry205 View Post
    I have asked but he has yet to tell me if the mites are killed by the vapor or if they have to come in contact with the product.
    Either one...
    From their website

    Sublimation: During the first few days, vapour plus solvent is slowly given off. Unlike some other formulations, or with raw crystals, this does not disturb the bees. The concentration of the thymol vapour from the gel gradually increases to a set level.


    Contact: Worker bees climb into the APIGUARD tray and begin to remove the gel, as a hive cleaning behaviour. The gel adheres to the bees' body hairs and as the bees run through the hive they distribute the product to the colony. The gel that the worker is carrying is eventually thrown out through the hive entrance but the trail it leaves behind on its journey through the brood nest remains until it too in cleaned
    Last edited by beemandan; 09-29-2010 at 12:53 PM.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Pell City,Alabama,USA
    Posts
    290

    Default Re: Experience with Apiguard.

    Dan, thanks for the info.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Experience with Apiguard.

    An update. I treated a couple of yards last week with Apiguard. I got a call last night from one of the property owners saying there is a 'swarm' hanging from a branch near the hives. I drove through on Saturday and took quick look at the hives and one had some pupae on the landing board and ground...I'm guessing that this is the hive that left. Temps here last week were in the eighties. I used half a dose. It is not unusual to have a few absconds with Apiguard but at half dose I was hoping to reduce it to none.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Pell City,Alabama,USA
    Posts
    290

    Default Re: Experience with Apiguard.

    When trying to decide between FA or Apiguard for a fall mite treatment, I choose Apiguard because the instructions recommend using in late summer when temps. are between 60 and 105 degrees. A very wide range. FA on the other hand is recommended at temps between 50 and 79 degrees, not a good choice for a late summer treatment in our geographic region. I decided to use Apiguard in late summer and FA in the spring if needed. All I know to do is to try tinkering with the dosage and application ( as you have recommended ) but still staying in line with the directions from the manufactuer. I have decided if you place it directly below larvae or capped brood, if they have any hygenic behavior at all they will remove it. Also seems to me that it would be better applied on thin card board or thick squares of paper. ( 4x4 ) We all know how they can shred and spread around paper and cardboard .

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads