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Thread: US Bee Imports

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    Manitoba Canada
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    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    >>At 5% varroa in the fall I would definitely treat. Are you saying that Rheal L does not recommend treatment at that level?

    Jean-marc

    thats now what I am saying. I agree, 5% is the treashold. Im just trying to say that holding bees over @ 5% without treatments is pretty much the same as killin of the hive in the fall.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  2. #42
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    Jan 2005
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    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
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    1,338

    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    Countryboy, I guess I should have worded that slightly differently. Canadian beekeepers can't purchase products such as Apiguard and the other thymol product, the one with some thymol and other essential oils that are impregnated in a green wafer. I forget the name of that product. Sure Canadians can purchase thymol crystals and add it to syrup. We don't have the blessing of the governement to do so. Other than Alpha I don't know any research institution that has made claims that thymol in syrup kills varroa. It's kinda like American beekeepers who don't have amitraz in a strip like we do but have been using liquid amitraz for some time now.

    Jean-Marc

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Whittier, CA
    Posts
    362

    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    Quote Originally Posted by Skinner Apiaries View Post
    1. How many hives do you have?
    2. Where do you take them?
    3. but your own name says RN,
    4. Do not dictate what is viable economically nor professionally when you are a hobbyist.
    5. Know your place.
    6. As to killing hives off entirely, public opinion aside, that's just wasteful.
    1. 90
    2. Almonds and orange and city.
    3. Name initials and not profesion.
    4. Nobody dictates to anybody. It is a free flow of information and opinions.
    5. Point it to me. Please.
    6. Agree

  4. #44
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    Jun 2008
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    Whittier, CA
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    362

    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    Quote Originally Posted by jean-marc View Post
    Andrei: To suggest that beekeepers use treatments because of ignorance or greed , ah come on give me a break. Beekeeper and greed don't match very well. Beekeepers do this profession because:
    1-dad was a beekeeper and he needed help
    2-they like working with bees.
    3-the hobby just kinda got out of hand.

    Beekeepers use treatments to keep their bees alive and well, not because they are ignorant. Taqke care of your ees and your bees will take care of you.

    Jean-Marc
    You are right here.
    But the one's I know are more $$$ hungry then bees.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
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    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    Jean-Marc,

    Thanks for the reply re breeding for varroa tolerance.

    Pity, I had been thinking results had been better than what you describe.


    One thought though, as I see things, most varroa tolerance thus far has focussed on VSH, probably because it's the easiest to measure. However if other things were brought into the mix, such as, among others, resistance to viruses spread by varroa, removal by grooming, damage to adult varroa, shorter brood cycle, all these things could lead us to a bee that could do without treatment. ( I hope ).

    It might end up that a treatment free bee would produce less honey, but that would be outweighed by not having the cost of treatment.

    Oh, and as to the 5% threshold, in my area winters are mild, brood rearing and a very light, patchy, flow continues through winter. A 5% mite load in fall is WAY too much. Quite a lot less than that can still be fatal, and only if I can get mites pretty close to zero in fall will the hives be looking real good in spring.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Central Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    Quote Originally Posted by Skinner Apiaries View Post
    I do not know any commercial migratory beekeepers pretending to be chemical free. I
    I don't know anything about commercial beekeeping, and while my personal goals are to stay away from chemicals I understand that commercial beeks have a lot at stake. I don't expect them to try and me chemical free. However, I did listen to a speaker this summer who was, in fact, a migratory treatment free beekeeper.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    >>Oh, and as to the 5% threshold, in my area winters are mild, brood rearing and a very light, patchy, flow continues through winter. A 5% mite load in fall is WAY too much. Quite a lot less than that can still be fatal, and only if I can get mites pretty close to zero in fall will the hives be looking real good in spring.

    ya, i hear you.

    our guys figured bees can winter on 10%,
    but thats before viral infections really took hold here. Id say its not the mite so much killing the hives, but the virus they bring with them
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  8. #48
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    Jul 2010
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    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
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    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    Good points Ian.

    I checked out your site BTW, nice shot of the Charolais keeping an eye on things while the bees are being worked!

    Also your wintering shed was interesting, we have no such things over here. I've linked it to our local beekeepers group i'm in, just for their interest.

  9. #49

    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    Quote Originally Posted by AndreiRN View Post
    You are right here.
    But the one's I know are more $$$ hungry then bees.
    I know a very successful businessman, beekeeper, who once told me, "You gotta like being in the bees first and if you're lucky, you'll find financial success."

  10. #50

    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    Quote Originally Posted by jean-marc View Post
    Overall perhaps a slight edge to Canada but not enough to make the grass appear greener on this side of the border. Besides soon it'll be white.

    Jean-Marc
    That made me chuckle. It just seems to me your government listens to what the bee officials say, and here it seems like someone's gotta be making alot of money on the lisencing before it goes anywhere...

  11. #51
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    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
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    5,993

    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    hey oldtimer,

    >>we have no such things over here

    soo many perspectives on this business it can make your head spin. Thats also what keeps this craft so interesting.

    You know, even between beekeepers here, our styles vary so much. Alot of guys work their hives in singles year round. Very efficiently, yet I cant get the same performance they do as when I work doubles. I can manage doubles excellently.
    I have found a system that works for my operation, and budget. you might notice I dont have the nicest boxes or the fanciest wintering shed. As I progress, I will update my operation, but until then, the money flows into other areas of the farm
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    dennison MN
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    i wonder if your canadian methods would work for us here in MN. we could winter bees in a building until feb. then pull them out and ship to almonds. i guess they would need to get there early to have time to build up. i dont like the bees sitting in a desert in cali. so close to so many other hives.

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,399

    Default Re: US Bee Imports

    A couple of years ago we shipped half our bees to Cali. and the other half to East Texas. My conclusion is that east Texas is just a little better environment, temps were usually comparable, nothing for the bees to work either place so that really wasnt a factor but by Feb. 1 we just had better looking bees in Texas. Since we do our splitting in east Texas anyway it works better to use it as a staging area and leave all the culls there to build up. It really dosent take a lot of extra work to ensure that pallets are free from fire ants and debris especially since the ants arent too active during the winter months.

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