Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 30
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default Carp Fishing and Eating

    I had a chance this morning togo out fishing with some friends of mine who are Chefs from Russia. We went out, I was wanting to catch bass and trout and when I met up with them, they were fishing for carp. I have always grown up to know that carp is not good eats but when we talked about it, they said that in many countries, it was a prized dish to have. I have known them as garbage fish but they were quick to tell me that is what americans think and for some reason, the chefs were puzzled as to why americans don't eat carp.

    Interesting things to think about.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    omaha nebr. USA
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    Nothing wrong with a 5-10 pound fresh water carp.
    Or quarter them & smoke um.
    Grandpa & his neighbor had quite the set up to smoke about 50 to 60 pounds at a time.
    Just darn good eating either way!!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,433

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    When my Dad was young, his family lived where they were building a big dam (now Grand Lake, Oklahoma). They would sometimes shut down the water flows and a bunch of carp would be trapped. He remembers they they would basically noodle the carp out of the pools and my grandmother would can them. He says it was not that much different than salmon, and the canning would soften all of the little forked bones that they have.

    OTOH, that was during some lean times, and they might have just been hungry for some protein.

    I have eaten Buffalo (the fish), which is a native sucker species. We caught a really big one, about 20 lbs, one time at Lake Wright Patman in TX. My East Texan relatives cut the ribs out of it and we fried them. They were a little oily, but not too bad, as I recall.

    I do think that there are different species of carp, and some of what they eat in Asia is not the same species as the German carp we have here in Oklahoma. Also, I think the water quality could have a big effect on the taste.

    I do like to catch them though. Here is a really good carp bait:

    Take about a cup of whole wheat grain and put it in a mayo type jar. Cover with about 2 or 3 cups water. Put the lid on and poke holes in it. Set out in the heat for a weak, until it sours.

    Then take a mixture of about 1/2 flour and 1/2 cottonseed meal and mix together with the water from the soured wheat and maybe 1/3 to 1/2 of the soured grain to make a stiff doughbait. Use on treble hooks. This does not work in current, because the bait washes off.

    Chum with the grain that you did not use in the dough.

    Channel catfish also really eat this stuff up.

    Another carp bait can be made by mashing up Wheaties cereal and making it into a stiff dough with strawberry sodapop. Catfish are not usually attracted to that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    my russian chef friends used bread mixed with peanut butter. when they got it out to bait the hooks, I couldnt figure it out as to what it was. Only until I asked I knew that it must be delicious. So, when they turned their back I had to try some. I think I ate it all. Who would have known!
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Findlay, Ohio
    Posts
    323

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    I do not know what this has to do with bees. BUT; Yes carp is good to eat if prepaired right! I grew up on the Delaware river in NW N.J. each spring 3 older jewish gentelman would drive across the state from Newark and bank fish for carp. As I remenber one day they were open fire pan frying some flays of carp, DANG it was good!! Now this was in the 60's. Some of these puppies could go to 50# on the Delaware and they are a lot of fun to catch.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Farmington, New Mexico
    Posts
    6,540

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    Guys, there's a reason you don't see carp on the menu at your favorite restaurant or sittin' there on ice in your local market.
    Nobody ruins my day without my permission, and I refuse to grant it...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Hudson, WI USA
    Posts
    2,177

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    For landlocked eastern european's carp was decent protein. If my history serves me correctly it was introduced to this country as a food item. I've never eaten them myself, but I've caught a bunch. Nothing I've caught fights as hard, or as doggedly as a carp. I haven't been fishing much since I've been keeping bees - I find beekeeping more productive. If "carpnet.com" still exists check it out for innovotive methods used in Europe. In Britain guys pay good money for rights to fish carp lakes with named fish. They camp out for days hoping to catch one of the big named, yes named, carp. Then they photograph it and lovingly return it to the water. When they have caught all the big fish in one lake they join another syndicate on another lake and start all over again.
    But then again, the weather over there is too lousy to make much honey.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    And, the answer might be:

    http://www.ofncommunity.com/forums/i...howtopic=27217

    Avoid slicing slabs of walleye for that sushi platter hereafter.

    Researchers with Environment Canada have discovered the presence of Asian tapeworms in walleye taken from Lake Huron.

    Asian tapeworms had been brought into the Great Lakes chain as early as the 1960s when Asian carp were released in Arkansas to remove vegetation growth in ponds. Carp eventually moved northward and began appearing in Great Lakes waters.

    Until recent findings in Lake Huron walleye, this terrible tapeworm had not been a threat to Great Lakes waters. A 1993 U. S. Biological Survey comment noted: “The worm had never been found in bass [anywhere]. It has not been found in walleye in North America.”

    A 1997 Utah Dept. of Agriculture and Food issued a policy statement on transporting fish that might carry this parasite, but not specific species were mentioned in that statement.

    Then, anglers reported finding mushroom-headed or phallic-shaped worms in the flesh of fish caught in the Saginaw Baw area during outings for the past two warm-water seasons. Michigan Dept. of Natural Resources (MDNR) offices were closed for the holidays this past week, but officials there confirmed studies have been conducted on their presence in Lake Huron walleyes. Michigan studies confirmed that these tapeworms have been found in fish taken from inland water bodies as well as the Great Lakes in that state.

    Sources noted that fish with these Asian tapeworms may be safe to eat when properly cooked, smoked, or pickled.

    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Urbana, IA
    Posts
    294

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    I love to catch carp on an ultralight setup, nothing fights like one! We usually go for them in early spring before the water gets muddied up. Carp out of cold water are very good albeit a tad oily. Make sure you trim the dark colored flesh out of the meat.
    We do them in a cold pickle, like a ceviche, they are also good deep fried!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    Barry: That is what they said about tilapia about 13 years ago and now, it is one of the most popular fish and they are considered a "garbage" fish.

    Ernie: Halibut are known for their worms inside the meat. We cut tons of halibut where I work and to check for works, we simply hold it up to the light and see in the protein.

    Typical American thinking that we don't eat carp. Just like we dont eat blowfish in america or some of the other delicacys from around the world like head cheese, calf braine, turtle, frog legs, white duck kidneys (aka: duck testicals). I have found that when teaching culinary arts, American cooks have two things in common..... they like to waste food and they like to eat only certain things. For example.... filet mignon, ny steak, ribeye steak. Great cuts of meat, yes. But in other cultures, more use of cuts that require moist heat cooking like shank, chuck, bottom round.

    Just some thoughts.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,166

    Big Grin Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Isaac View Post
    simply hold it up to the light and see in the protein.
    And here I've been sending sub to the lab to check for protein when all I had to do was hold it up to the light.
    NUTRA-BEE feed supplements

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ennis, TX USA
    Posts
    5,125

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    Carp it good eats. Just boney so a lot of people consider it a trash fish. It's one of if not the best fighting fish in our parts. We are going carping in late September. They start to bite when it gets cooler. (So do the bigger catfish)
    Chuck Norris has a grizzly bear carpet in his room. The bear isn't dead it is just afraid to move.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Findlay, Ohio
    Posts
    323

    Thumbs Up Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    Kudos!! I am 63 now and have eaten many things, some very good and some not so good. Ground Hog, Musk Rat (marsh rabbit), raccon, different snakes & lizzars (south Pasific Igauna tails - real good)! Do not care for insects at all. I agree most Americans are meat & potato, especially in the mid-west. There is a lot of good stuff out there to eat and some are cooked with HONEY that are really good & good for you!
    My 2 cents worth.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,433

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    Hambone,

    How do you cook them, and how do you deal with the bones?

    Neil

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Seattle, Washington State
    Posts
    4,398

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    neil: The bones can be cut out. They have the same body structor as catfish and snapper. The rib bones are the most problamatic but they can be cut out as well. You want to use a filet knife for this... something flexable. If you would like, I can post a video.

    To cook (this is going by the russian chef friends I fished with) pan frying and smoking are the most popular in Russia. I hope this helps.
    Chef Isaac..Culinary Arts and Honey are a sweet mix! http://www.sweetascanbeehoneyfarm.com & http://www.adoptahive.info

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    We consume carp.
    You need to know how to prepare the dish!.
    BTW:
    Please pass the chittlings, corn bread, and mustard greens. But, I will pass on the hog crowns.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,433

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    I can filet fish just fine, but how do you get rid of all the little forked bones? If you can show me how to do that, post a video.

    (Also, while you're filming, what I really want to see is a video showing how to butterfly a trout or other similar fish.)

    Back to carp, I remember reading somewhere that the biomass of carp in a particular body of water typically outweighs the biomass of all the "gamefish" species combined. So they are definitely and underutilized resource. Around here, most carp are taken by bowfishermen.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ennis, TX USA
    Posts
    5,125

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    Quote Originally Posted by NeilV View Post
    Hambone,

    How do you cook them, and how do you deal with the bones?

    Neil

    Ive never cooked it myself. I have had it cooked for me a few times. The ways I have seen it cooked are fried and pressure cooked. Smaller carp scored really well and fried most of the bones will melt or pull out easily. The pressurized method will basically make the bones gelatinize like canned salmon. Then you can make cakes with it.

    When I go fishing for carp I go fishing for sport and release them. Buffalo is the most popular of the sucker fish to eat here. All the Spanish markets sell Buffalo now. Buffalo also makes very good Blue Catfish bait.
    Chuck Norris has a grizzly bear carpet in his room. The bear isn't dead it is just afraid to move.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    20

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    ive gone for carp far many years here in NY on the Erie Canal. There sure are some big one in there. My favorite is a 5wt flyrod with a yellow gloe-bug or a small hook with a kernel or 2 of corn.
    Ive never eaten carp, but ive heard of the recipe:
    Cook Carp in oven on particleboard with lemon, salt, and pepper at 385 for about an hour.
    remove carp from board
    throw away carp
    eat board

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,869

    Default Re: Carp Fishing and Eating

    When I was a kid we would use frog gigs to catch them during the spawn, then leave them on the bank to die. Grew up believing they where trash fish eaten by folks much poorer the us. //shrugs shoulders//

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads