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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
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    1,020

    Default Two queens in one hive!

    Following supersedure, it is not uncommon for the old queen to stay in the hive 'on a pension' for some time after the new queen emerges. I have seen this several times, but this is the first time I managed to capture it on video - the new queen, the old queen and a supersedure cell, all on one frame.

    (This was filmed during a meeting at Buckfast Abbey on August 8th 2010, while the apiary manager, Clare Densley, was inspecting a Dadant nuc with Langstroth frames.)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFiZ_pk8Hq8
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,029

    Default Re: Two queens in one hive!

    Nice video buckbee I've saved it to my favorites!

    I'm real pleased someone has actually video'd this, to be able to demonstrate that this happens will help people who have problems requeening etc because they don't realise there are two queens in the hive at the time.

    A visit to Buckfast Abbey must have been awesome also. I've been wanting to do that for many years but still haven't made it yet.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,020

    Default Re: Two queens in one hive!

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    Nice video buckbee I've saved it to my favorites!

    I'm real pleased someone has actually video'd this, to be able to demonstrate that this happens will help people who have problems requeening etc because they don't realise there are two queens in the hive at the time.
    I think this is more common than most people think. Thing is, when we find one queen, we rarely go looking for another one!

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    A visit to Buckfast Abbey must have been awesome also. I've been wanting to do that for many years but still haven't made it yet.
    I used to work at the Abbey, so it was interesting to go back and see how things have changed. I'm glad they stopped trying to be a commercial honey producer and have made the move to having it as a teaching apiary.
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,029

    Default Re: Two queens in one hive!

    I see, so hence the name Buckbee!

    Re them ceasing commercial production, I was a surprised when i read on their web site that their production from 240 hives, was 4 tons. The map shows them near Dartmoore, which to my knowledge ( I'm on the other side of the world from you ), is a wild weather type of place?

    Is it pretty hard for bees to get a good crop in that area?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,020

    Default Re: Two queens in one hive!

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post
    I see, so hence the name Buckbee!

    Re them ceasing commercial production, I was a surprised when i read on their web site that their production from 240 hives, was 4 tons. The map shows them near Dartmoore, which to my knowledge ( I'm on the other side of the world from you ), is a wild weather type of place?

    Is it pretty hard for bees to get a good crop in that area?
    Those figures probably date back to Brother Adam's time - he was more interested in queen production than honey, and had about 450 nucs!. When I was there, we had closer to 400 production hives, and honey production was around 7-8 tons, I think.

    Although Buckfast is on the edge of Dartmoor, the apiaries were spread around the Dart valley, which is productive lowland, mostly dairy and beef, with a decent amount of woodland and hundreds of miles of hedgrows.

    Bro. Adam used to take hives up to the heather on the moor in August, but that hasn't been done since his time. The heather is nowadays rather patchy, and notoriously unpredictable in its yield.
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

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