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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Islip Terrace, NY, USA
    Posts
    99

    Default Rain and effect on nectar/pollen

    first year beek here...we finally got some rain here in the northeast, it was pretty heavy at times, and i was wondering:

    how much rain/length of rain will affect plant pollen/nectar production?

    what should i be watching out for?

    how long do plants need to begin producing nectar/pollen?

    does the rain wash everything out?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Munfordville, Ky. U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,245

    Default Re: Rain and effect on nectar/pollen

    While I am not an expert on bees collecting pollen & nectar, I have been a farmer for most of my 66 years. Think about it if it comes a drenching rain how could it not wash out all but the most stubbornly attached bee feed. However, the rain just brings more blooms and bee feed. The only time you really lose a lot is like this year, we had one of the best locust blooms we have had for around 10-12 years. It started raining about the time they hit full bloom and continued for most of 2 weeks. No Locust honey, which is the best it gets in my area.
    So much to learn, so little time!!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    278

    Default Re: Rain and effect on nectar/pollen

    Different flowers produce nectar at different times of the day. Bees know this and they visit the flowers when the nectar is present. In heavy rains, the nectar does get diluted a bit and causes the bees more work to evaporate it into honey. But I think the main problem is simply that the bees don't fly in the rain so honey production goes down because of that.
    Last edited by honeyman46408; 07-14-2010 at 02:10 PM. Reason: UNQ
    Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss you`ll be among the stars!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Motley County, Texas
    Posts
    507

    Default Re: Rain and effect on nectar/pollen

    For the last two weeks or so, it has rained here in the southern portion of the Texas panhandle, every single day for 14 days straight. Not tons of rain, just some everyday. This is extremely unusual for this area of Texas and I am very much looking forward to the flowers that will be produced from this rain. Should carry us through until the fall honey flow.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,870

    Default Re: Rain and effect on nectar/pollen

    It depends on all the things mentioned as well as the type of flower, a down pointing flower will not be affected by rain. I was always told it took one to two days for the nectar to recover, but my bees go right back to work shortly after a rain so I am not so sure.

    Black Locust is a very fickle bloom, very often once it rains...it is done, and it bloom during our wettest part of the year!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bristol,MA,USA
    Posts
    787

    Default Re: Rain and effect on nectar/pollen

    Rain = Pennies from heaven. If there is a strong honey flow on, the bees will continue collecting during light rains. In our area, the bees are usually back out foraging about an hour after the rain unless there is very high humidity when they would be needed more in the hive. Depends also IMHO on the strain of bee you have. Some are definitely more industrious during a rain than others. OMTCW

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Springfield, MO. USA
    Posts
    283

    Default Re: Rain and effect on nectar/pollen

    Plants need an occasional watering in order to continue producing nectar....at least most of them. Plants need water and sun in order to complete their photosynthesis process. Of course it can't rain and sunshine at the same time, which is where moisture retention in soil is important. I imagine honey crops around irrigated agricultural crops produce well.

    Now, I did read somewhere, and I'm not exactly sure how different plants react, but it read that once pollinated a plant will no longer produce nectar. I'll have to look for that text to clarify.

    Later, John

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