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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Louisville Kentucky USA
    Posts
    458

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rick 1456
    "Sticks and stones may break my bones but a ford will never pass me"
    67 Camaro collector car
    rick SoMd

    "My Ford will "
    __________________
    www.maxantindustries.com
    American made Honey Processing Equipment "Built to last a lifetime"

    My Ford won't - a 1914 touring car.
    Steven

    Well since everybody else weighed in on the battle,I dont think your ford or chevy could pass my Dodge! Just kidding guys but since I'm usually the lone Mopar guy(thus the name hemichuck) I have to stand up and be counted.

    I am currently using deeps,mediums,and some shallows and I can tell you its a pain in the butt.I would(and will)go to 10 frame all mediums.Its easier to cut down nucs to medium than try to shuffle frames around all the time to fit this and that.

    One last car prod,As soon as a ford or chevy powered car wins an NHRA/IHRA top fuel championship,I will switch brands.(that should keep me safe for another 50 years)

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Kingsford, Mi, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Hello all. My name is Bob and I'm sure that I'm newer than most anybody here, since I start in Spring in the U.P. of Michigan. I don't have much $$$ to start with, so I will be doing some "Horse Trading" to get started. I have a local up here who has alot of equipment, all or most of it currently functioning. He will sell me a working hive with bees and honey for $200. From what I saw, it contained the following;
    1. BB. I don't know if it's screened or solid.
    2. Entrance Reducer.
    3. Two Hive Bodies (9 5/8'')
    4. Excluder.
    5. Two Full 10 frame Supers.
    6. Inner cover and Telscoping Cover.

    My main concerns, as someone stated earlier in this thred, is the health of the bees. I'm not too concerned about having to replace some frames or even do minor repairs. Seccondly, feeding in Spring. We are in a really cold climate U.P. here so I'm sure feeding early is important.
    BTW, I have 2 apple trees on my property, HUGE Lilac bushes and my neighbor is a comercial vegetable gardener with atleast an acre garden.

    I guess the big question is; what do I need to watch for when buying a working hive?
    Thanks for all of this info.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,209

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Lol bob, Honeybees will forage over about a 2 mile radius from the hive. Do you know how many acres are in a 2 mile radius circle?

    A = Pi X Radius^2
    A = 3.14 X 4
    A = 12.56 square miles or about 8000 acres.

    Bees won't travel that far unless they have to, but they will go where needed to get the nectar. I guess what I am trying to say is that an acre here or an acre there really doesn't stack up in a bee's world.

    If you are buying used equipment, there are three things to know.
    1. is the equipment solid and well maintained?
    2. Is the colony strong and well established?
    3. Have they been treated for disease? or mites?

    From your description, it looks like you would get 2 deep brood chambers and 2 supers included in the colony. That is a reasonable price for a colony in good condition.

    DarJones
    DarJones - 44 years, 10 colonies (max 40), sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 11 frame broodnest, small cell

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Kingsford, Mi, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Thanks, I will ask those questions.
    The supplier, in this case, is deep in the woods, where as I am on the outskirts of Kingsford Mi, a rural area.
    When is the best time to move the hive? Now, while slightly above freezing, in the cold dead of winter or early spring? I thought after warm weather, wouldn't be a good idea since the hive would be active at that point, and introducing them to a new area could cause problems that I'm unaware of.
    Also, should I consider re-queening immediately?

    Thanks for the response!

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Shoshone County, Idaho
    Posts
    567

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Stick with all 10 frame 7 5/8" boxes, one size for all.
    Migratory covers.
    Palletized hives (ie. no bottom boards)
    Top entrances.
    No meds/treatments.
    Wood frames with black pierco foundation.



    Move them anytime, wait and see how the queens are doing in the spring.
    Could move them in spring at night and with a bee net.
    Last edited by Mtn. Bee; 11-17-2011 at 07:17 PM.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cookeville, TN, USA
    Posts
    3,971

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Quote Originally Posted by BobnJeep View Post
    My main concerns, as someone stated earlier in this thred, is the health of the bees. I'm not too concerned about having to replace some frames or even do minor repairs. Seccondly, feeding in Spring. We are in a really cold climate U.P. here so I'm sure feeding early is important.
    BTW, I have 2 apple trees on my property, HUGE Lilac bushes and my neighbor is a comercial vegetable gardener with atleast an acre garden.

    I guess the big question is; what do I need to watch for when buying a working hive?
    Thanks for all of this info.
    Based on the discussion about AFB on another thread my main question would be "do you use antibiotics to prevent foulbrood?" apparently it's a hard treadmill to get off of without losing bees. An apparently healthy hive could bring the funk into your yard if it has been routinely suppressed with antibiotics - and you might not know it for a long time until conditions are right.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Munfordville, Ky. U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,246

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Quote Originally Posted by valleyman View Post
    Thought about this a lot.
    I would definitely go with Wood
    I would definitely go with all mediums
    I would definitely go with pierco wax coated foundation.
    I would definitely go with sbb.
    I would definitely go with plastic tops and inner covers.
    I would definitely make migratory covers with jar cap feeder holes to use when I am feeding syrup. (stops robbing and keeps the ants out)
    I would definitely, if possible, try the new USDA Russians from a member of the Russian Breeders Association
    As far as 8 or 10 frame that is personal preferance, I go with 10.
    I would probably use the vented 2 1/2" super from Kelleys on top for ventilation when not feeding.

    I would definitely buy all of my equipment from Walter T Kelley Co. because they have very good products at a reasonable price.

    Good luck, sure wish I had the opportunity to start over!!!
    Barry I know this is excessive quoting, but there's no other way to explain what I'm going to say.
    I've thought about this a lot more, and a little over a year later allow me to change a few things.
    I would still go with wood.
    I will not go to all mediums, even if I were starting over, because I don't want to go thru many more frames while inspecting the brood nest, and I believe that during the winter with 2 deeps the cluster will move thru the honey better in deeps, and not have to cross an empty space in moving from one mediium to another.
    I will still go with pierco plastic foundation, with extra wax brushed on.
    I will still go with SBBs, and add ventilation to the top year around. I use the vented supers from Kelleys.
    I will still use plastic telescoping tops.
    I will definitely never buy another plastic inner cover to use as an inner cover. I will use the 10 that I bought to cut out for the 4 quart feeder frame so it can set directly on the frames.
    I will use the migratory cover with a jar lid hole to feed strong hives that only need a little boost. I now have gallon jars to put on those. The jar on top seems to let the bees smell the syrup so this can induce robbing. I will use the 4 quart feeder on hives that are weak, in my opinion this helps prevent robbing by hiding the feed. I also keep my entrances reduced year around.

    I definitely will never, after having experienced them for a year, install ANY kind of Russian genetics in my hives.

    I will stick with 10 frame equipment because it means that you get more for the money, and don't have to open as many boxes. If I get to where they are too heavy then I need to quit anyway.
    I definitely will use the vented super from Kelleys all year around with the SBBs open all year around, unless I have an extended period of -0 degree temperatures then I will close off part or all of the bottom. This works for me in central Ky. Cold don't kill bees, moisture does, especially a combination of them.
    I will still definitely buy all of my equipment from Walter T Kelley Co. because they still have the best prices for the quality of the product and the service.
    Last but not least, I will, and have fed HFCS because it is very cheap for me. (free).
    So much to learn, so little time!!

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    dadeville, alabama, USA
    Posts
    1,163

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    I would have purchased a bobcat and palletized my hives years (decades) earlier. Thus I would have saved a lot of physical strain on my body. By doing so beekeeping would have been alot more pleasureable. TED
    ALABAMA BEE COMPANY-A member of the Sioux Honey association -*Sweetening a golden tommorrow*

  9. #49
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Garland, Bladen County, NC, USA
    Posts
    2,956

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    My GMC 6500 bee truck would have 4 wheel drive!

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,227

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Quote Originally Posted by Ted Kretschmann View Post
    I would have purchased a bobcat and palletized my hives years (decades) earlier. Thus I would have saved a lot of physical strain on my body. TED
    Comments like these just blow my mind after the abuse I took on palletizing hives.

    I followed Michael Bush's lead.

    I own a Ford and a Dodge plow truck. The Ford is a heavier built truck but the Dodge will blow by it any day. Neither one is used for beekeeping. I think if I were to do something commercial I would have a motor home and the biggest trailer that I could pull behind it. You could write off the motor home and you don't need a CDL to haul your hives around.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  11. #51
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Owensboro, KY
    Posts
    149

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Even though I am a new beekeeper I find it hard to change my ways. Over the past spring, summer, and fall I have become accustomed to certain equipment, and can't see changing it anytime soon.


    The only 3 things that I would require in new equipment would be .....

    10 Frame

    Screened Bottom Board

    Slotted Top / Grooved Side & Bottom Frames. Similar to Kelley's "N" Style frame. These are super easy to load with new foundation, and require little maintenance.

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    307

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    I would have bought the 10" smoker right off the bat.

    Tony P.
    There must be a harder way to do that... let me find it for you.

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    I see an advantage to having uniformly-sized equipment. All 10-frame deeps, or all 8-frame mediums, or whatever you prefer. Swapping pieces out is easier if everything fits everything else.

    Having said that, realistically, I would likely start out that way if I were starting over and quickly wind up with a mix of sizes and depths just like I have now.

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,973

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Quote Originally Posted by Kieck View Post
    ...realistically, I would likely start out that way [one size] if I were starting over and quickly wind up with a mix of sizes and depths just like I have now.
    That hits on my main reservation about going all medium.

    The fact is that money is tight all around. And in this part of the world, deeps are very common. It's pretty easy to get deeps at good prices, or through friends and through nucs, etc. It seems that you're still going to find yourself in translation snag no matter what you do...

    I find myself inclined to go with deep and medium 8's.


    Adam

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,318

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Adam,
    I can certainly understand the reasoning behind your decision. Management practices vary regionally and from one beekeeper to another. I keep a few colonies on deep frames, but the majority are on medium frames only. I have learned an appreciation for the extra flexibility of management that having all one size frame facilitates -- it would be difficult/uncomfortable for me to regress back to mixed frame sizes, especially in each individual colony, but some beekeepers never do it any other way, and I'm sure they get along just fine.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Location considerations are important, I think. Deeps are easily the most common depth around here (and the vast majority of my equipment is deep as well). If you have intentions of transferring bees to or from other beekeepers, knowing what they have and use is important, too.

    I started with deeps for hive bodies, mediums and shallows for supers. Along the way, I converted to almost all deeps. 10-frame versus 8-frame is another matter, and I have more mixed equipment that way, but at least most of my frames will fit in most of the boxes I have.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baker Oregon
    Posts
    2,370

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    This winter I am moving into all 8 frame equitment. I have not decided if I want to go all deeps, or keep the deep/medium mixed, however I know I do not want to go to all mediums.

    Dan
    Dan Hayden 4 Years. 9 hives. Tx Free. USDA Zone 5b.

  18. #58
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    1,973

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Quote Originally Posted by RiodeLobo View Post
    ...however I know I do not want to go to all mediums.

    Dan
    Why's that, Dan? I'm interested in why people prefer different sizes.

    Adam

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Shoshone County, Idaho
    Posts
    567

    Thumbs Up Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Quote Originally Posted by RiodeLobo View Post
    This winter I am moving into all 8 frame equitment. I have not decided if I want to go all deeps, or keep the deep/medium mixed, however I know I do not want to go to all mediums.

    Dan
    Dan,
    Did you ever consider all 7 5/8" boxes?
    You gain quite a bit of extra space over all Meds. and I winter in 3 boxes which equals more room than double deeps and they are sure a lot lighter than deeps.
    Also some of the major bee supply houses carry frames, plastic foundation, etc.
    Mtn. Bee

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Baker Oregon
    Posts
    2,370

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    For me it is working smarter not harder. As a relitive newb it takes more time to inspect and is just easer to heft some more weight around in exchange for inspecting fewer frames.

    I have considers going all 7 5/8 but I think I will need more room and stores than 2 would provide, so I would be back at 3 brood boxes.

    I really don't think any of it matters to much for us hobby guys, it is all personal preferance. For side liners and pros i can see that the differances would be substantial.
    Dan
    Dan Hayden 4 Years. 9 hives. Tx Free. USDA Zone 5b.

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