Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 64

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tompkins County, New York
    Posts
    118

    Question If you were buying all your equipment again...

    I'll be expanding my apiary in the spring. I have a chance to "start over," as it were, since I'll be buying a lot of new equipment. Eight frame or 10? Wax or plastic (or wood and plastic, or Duragilt, or...). Mediums or deeps? Screened bottom board or solid?

    I'm in Upstate NY, so my bees have to get through a long, cold winter with one or two brief breaks, most years.

    I'm interested in what people like, what they wish they had, and most of all, the regrets!

    Thanks!
    My beekeeping blog: The Bee Yard

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Woodlawn, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    330

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    At this point, about the only thing I would change would be to go to all mediums. I like the ten frame, and I prefer the wood. But I started out with deep/shallow combo, and bought out another beek who had some medium. Wish I were in all medium for ease of frame manipulation and weight consideration.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Philadelphia, MS, USA
    Posts
    611

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Wood frames with plastic foundation.

    Definatly no Duragilt.

    10 frame.

    maybe all medium, not sure yet.

    Johnny
    "Suppose you were an idiot and suppose you were a member of Congress. But I repeat myself." - Mark Twain

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Munfordville, Ky. U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,245

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Thought about this a lot.
    I would definitely go with Wood
    I would definitely go with all mediums
    I would definitely go with pierco wax coated foundation.
    I would definitely go with sbb.
    I would definitely go with plastic tops and inner covers.
    I would definitely make migratory covers with jar cap feeder holes to use when I am feeding syrup. (stops robbing and keeps the ants out)
    I would definitely, if possible, try the new USDA Russians from a member of the Russian Breeders Association
    As far as 8 or 10 frame that is personal preferance, I go with 10.
    I would probably use the vented 2 1/2" super from Kelleys on top for ventilation when not feeding.

    I would definitely buy all of my equipment from Walter T Kelley Co. because they have very good products at a reasonable price.

    Good luck, sure wish I had the opportunity to start over!!!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tompkins County, New York
    Posts
    118

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    I tried all mediums one year, and didn't like two things: if I buy a nuc, it'll be on deeps (though lately I've been going with packages anyway, to avoid other people's contaminated wax issues) and it means 30 frames to go through instead of 20 when looking for the queen.

    But the weight issue has made me consider 8-frame. Any 8-frame adherents want to tell me how they like it?
    My beekeeping blog: The Bee Yard

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,023

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    If I had to start over again I'd do the same as I do now:

    1) All 8-frame medium supers
    2) a) foundationless wood frames with horizontal support wires
    b) PF120 frames
    c) PF120 foundation core, cut out, then installed in wooden frames
    d) beeswax 4.9mm foundation in wood with horizontal support wires
    3) Screened bottom boards with slatted racks - without entrance
    4) Upper entrances
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Munfordville, Ky. U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,245

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Quote Originally Posted by valleyman View Post
    Thought about this a lot.
    I would definitely go with Wood
    I would definitely go with all mediums
    I would definitely go with pierco wax coated foundation.
    I would definitely go with sbb.
    I would definitely go with plastic tops and inner covers.
    I would definitely make migratory covers with jar cap feeder holes to use when I am feeding syrup. (stops robbing and keeps the ants out)
    I would definitely, if possible, try the new USDA Russians from a member of the Russian Breeders Association
    As far as 8 or 10 frame that is personal preferance, I go with 10.
    I would probably use the vented 2 1/2" super from Kelleys on top for ventilation when not feeding.

    I would definitely buy all of my equipment from Walter T Kelley Co. because they have very good products at a reasonable price.

    Good luck, sure wish I had the opportunity to start over!!!
    Barry I know this is excessive quoting, but there's no other way to explain what I'm going to say.
    I've thought about this a lot more, and a little over a year later allow me to change a few things.
    I would still go with wood.
    I will not go to all mediums, even if I were starting over, because I don't want to go thru many more frames while inspecting the brood nest, and I believe that during the winter with 2 deeps the cluster will move thru the honey better in deeps, and not have to cross an empty space in moving from one mediium to another.
    I will still go with pierco plastic foundation, with extra wax brushed on.
    I will still go with SBBs, and add ventilation to the top year around. I use the vented supers from Kelleys.
    I will still use plastic telescoping tops.
    I will definitely never buy another plastic inner cover to use as an inner cover. I will use the 10 that I bought to cut out for the 4 quart feeder frame so it can set directly on the frames.
    I will use the migratory cover with a jar lid hole to feed strong hives that only need a little boost. I now have gallon jars to put on those. The jar on top seems to let the bees smell the syrup so this can induce robbing. I will use the 4 quart feeder on hives that are weak, in my opinion this helps prevent robbing by hiding the feed. I also keep my entrances reduced year around.

    I definitely will never, after having experienced them for a year, install ANY kind of Russian genetics in my hives.

    I will stick with 10 frame equipment because it means that you get more for the money, and don't have to open as many boxes. If I get to where they are too heavy then I need to quit anyway.
    I definitely will use the vented super from Kelleys all year around with the SBBs open all year around, unless I have an extended period of -0 degree temperatures then I will close off part or all of the bottom. This works for me in central Ky. Cold don't kill bees, moisture does, especially a combination of them.
    I will still definitely buy all of my equipment from Walter T Kelley Co. because they still have the best prices for the quality of the product and the service.
    Last but not least, I will, and have fed HFCS because it is very cheap for me. (free).
    So much to learn, so little time!!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    dadeville, alabama, USA
    Posts
    1,163

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    I would have purchased a bobcat and palletized my hives years (decades) earlier. Thus I would have saved a lot of physical strain on my body. By doing so beekeeping would have been alot more pleasureable. TED
    ALABAMA BEE COMPANY-A member of the Sioux Honey association -*Sweetening a golden tommorrow*

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Brady, washington
    Posts
    710

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Things I would never use again is duragilt I would use eight frame mediums no deeps. I would use wood frames plastic foundation easy peasy on that.
    99.99% of questions can be answered by Just reading books.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Knox County, Ohio
    Posts
    2,709

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    If I was buying, or if I was making equipment again?

    It's cheapest to go all deeps, but harder on your back. How much money do you want to spend?

    What are your beekeeping goals? If I was a woman, who just wanted a few hives for honey production, I would probably just go with Top Bar Hives. Cheap, and the weight isn't going to be an issue.

    If I wanted to raise bees and nucs, I would probably go with all deeps. A deep box of bees isn't nearly as heavy as a deep box of honey.

    If I wanted to do honey production, I'd probably go with jumbos or deeps for a broodbox, with shallows or mediums for honey supers.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Malabar, FL
    Posts
    1,280

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    we run 8-frame equipment, combo of deeps and mediums. We like 2 deeps for brood , however after moving them back from orange we do throw some mediums on top of deep brood chambers also as we like to use the drawm deep combs on splits and increases. We usually start a good flow with deeps for honey then as they are filled follow up with mediums. Dependant upon how many hives you have and how many you want... an upgrade on the extractor may be necessary. A 20 frame dadant will extract 20 deeps and 36 meds if you choose to stuff that many mediums in there, and overall does not cost that much more money that extractors which do not handle deeps as well. Good luck.

    Steve
    A government large enough to provide everything you need is strong enough to take everything you have. T. Jefferson

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,284

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    I started from scratch this year and went to all 10 frame mediums. I had the same initial concern about having all the extra frames to check when doing a full inspection. But the benefits in my opinion are well worth the extra time and labor.

    It will be so much easier now to keep the brood nest opened up during swarm season. And having the freedom to move or swap frames anywhere I need them, to me, is a tremendous advantage. I used to get so frustrated when I had a mix of deeps and mediums and lacked the simplicity of moving frames around where I wanted them. KISS works well for me.
    To everything there is a season....

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Tompkins County, New York
    Posts
    118

    Question Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Thanks again to everyone for their replies. I'm placing my order today for 20 8-frame hives with supers, and enough wood frames to supplement what I already have. (I'm planning on starting 15 hives, but getting extra equipment, because you always need it!) I'm still kicking around foundation: I have about 100 sheets of small cell wax that I might as well use; I'm considering doing 5 hives of Honey Supercell as a test, since people seem to like it, and then five of... Still not sure. So many people like wax coated plastic, but I've had a horrible time in the past getting bees to draw it. These hives aren't in my backyard and I hate the idea of being out there scraping badly drawn plastic every week until they get it right! So I may go with traditional crimp wired wax.

    Hmmm.
    My beekeeping blog: The Bee Yard

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Woodstock, GA
    Posts
    56

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Based on my experience I have had better results with a screened bottom board and plastic foundation. I like deeps for brood and regular supers for the honey production. Use what works in your area and keep all materials interchangeable.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Gilmer,TX USA
    Posts
    1,871

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    If I lost everything, and had to start over-
    Migratory Tops
    Solid bottom boards
    Vsh/buckfast bees
    Plastic foundation
    Wood frames - all from the same company. I have have frames from everyone and their dog and the manufacturing differences make me go nuts.
    Bucket feeders
    Either all mediums or all deeps, or both, but run them separate, I.E. yard 1 mediums, yard 2 deeps, etc


    mike
    Please check out the new kingfisherapiaries.com!
    Like us on Facebook

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bristol,MA,USA
    Posts
    689

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    If I had bought all cypress woodenware when I started over fifty years ago, I would still have the same supers. What a savings in labor and money! Still have the mediums I bought over 40 years ago. So if I were starting over, everything would be made of cypress. OMTCW

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Louisville Kentucky USA
    Posts
    459

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rick 1456
    "Sticks and stones may break my bones but a ford will never pass me"
    67 Camaro collector car
    rick SoMd

    "My Ford will "
    __________________
    www.maxantindustries.com
    American made Honey Processing Equipment "Built to last a lifetime"

    My Ford won't - a 1914 touring car.
    Steven

    Well since everybody else weighed in on the battle,I dont think your ford or chevy could pass my Dodge! Just kidding guys but since I'm usually the lone Mopar guy(thus the name hemichuck) I have to stand up and be counted.

    I am currently using deeps,mediums,and some shallows and I can tell you its a pain in the butt.I would(and will)go to 10 frame all mediums.Its easier to cut down nucs to medium than try to shuffle frames around all the time to fit this and that.

    One last car prod,As soon as a ford or chevy powered car wins an NHRA/IHRA top fuel championship,I will switch brands.(that should keep me safe for another 50 years)

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Kingsford, Mi, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Hello all. My name is Bob and I'm sure that I'm newer than most anybody here, since I start in Spring in the U.P. of Michigan. I don't have much $$$ to start with, so I will be doing some "Horse Trading" to get started. I have a local up here who has alot of equipment, all or most of it currently functioning. He will sell me a working hive with bees and honey for $200. From what I saw, it contained the following;
    1. BB. I don't know if it's screened or solid.
    2. Entrance Reducer.
    3. Two Hive Bodies (9 5/8'')
    4. Excluder.
    5. Two Full 10 frame Supers.
    6. Inner cover and Telscoping Cover.

    My main concerns, as someone stated earlier in this thred, is the health of the bees. I'm not too concerned about having to replace some frames or even do minor repairs. Seccondly, feeding in Spring. We are in a really cold climate U.P. here so I'm sure feeding early is important.
    BTW, I have 2 apple trees on my property, HUGE Lilac bushes and my neighbor is a comercial vegetable gardener with atleast an acre garden.

    I guess the big question is; what do I need to watch for when buying a working hive?
    Thanks for all of this info.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Hamilton, Alabama
    Posts
    1,190

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Lol bob, Honeybees will forage over about a 2 mile radius from the hive. Do you know how many acres are in a 2 mile radius circle?

    A = Pi X Radius^2
    A = 3.14 X 4
    A = 12.56 square miles or about 8000 acres.

    Bees won't travel that far unless they have to, but they will go where needed to get the nectar. I guess what I am trying to say is that an acre here or an acre there really doesn't stack up in a bee's world.

    If you are buying used equipment, there are three things to know.
    1. is the equipment solid and well maintained?
    2. Is the colony strong and well established?
    3. Have they been treated for disease? or mites?

    From your description, it looks like you would get 2 deep brood chambers and 2 supers included in the colony. That is a reasonable price for a colony in good condition.

    DarJones
    DarJones - 44 years, 10 colonies (max 40), sideliner, treatment free since 2005, 11 frame broodnest, small cell

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Kingsford, Mi, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: If you were buying all your equipment again...

    Thanks, I will ask those questions.
    The supplier, in this case, is deep in the woods, where as I am on the outskirts of Kingsford Mi, a rural area.
    When is the best time to move the hive? Now, while slightly above freezing, in the cold dead of winter or early spring? I thought after warm weather, wouldn't be a good idea since the hive would be active at that point, and introducing them to a new area could cause problems that I'm unaware of.
    Also, should I consider re-queening immediately?

    Thanks for the response!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads