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Thread: Air bubbles

  1. #1
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    Default Air bubbles

    With a vat of about 100 lbs of honey, can anyone say from experience about how long it takes for the air bubbles to percolate up for bottling? (Clearly 48 hrs wasn't sufficient...)

  2. #2
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    owensboro,ky
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    Default Re: Air bubbles

    its entirely dependant on the vicosity of your honey, the temperature of your honey (relates also to practicle viscosity) and the extent of bubbles in the honey (did you pour from a height? let the honey stream "swirl" on the way in?)- so no, no one can say. warming it up to reduce viscosity (make it "thinner") will help.
    good luck,mike
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Air bubbles

    Assuming that you did a standard extraction ( not crush and strain ) and because of your area the honey is likely pretty dry (14-15% moisture).... The bubbles will never come out at room temp. At 120F it will take about 2 days.

    With thick dry honey, the extraction process layers millions of fine tiny air bubbles into the honey as it spins. The honey is too thick to allow the bubbles to rise. It may not even look like bubbles, more like cloudy honey. But a flashlight through the side will highlight the tiny bubbles for you to see.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Air bubbles

    Wow, good info. Yes, I did a standard extraction. So, given that the bubbles aren't all coming out, is it considered okay to bottle that way? I don't really have a practical way of heating... other than setting the container out in the direct sun, I guess (assuming we ever shake the June Gloom down here, which has extended into July).
    Last edited by walking bird; 07-06-2010 at 11:36 PM. Reason: addition

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Air bubbles

    if bottled, it will eventually have a layer of foam come to the top. wont hurt it, but detracts from the appearence if you sell. use it to your advantage-"thats proof its not heated/blended(with syrup)/filtered" but is "bona-fied 100% pure, natural honey!"
    "Wine is a constant proof that God loves us and loves to see us happy" Ben Franklin

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Air bubbles

    It sounds like your bees got into a sage honey flow!
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Air bubbles

    "if bottled, it will eventually have a layer of foam come to the top"

    If the honey is too thick it will not !!! Instead, the tiny bubbles act as a point source for granulation to begin. It will turn solid very quickly.... seen it too many times.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Air bubbles

    Quote Originally Posted by BEES4U View Post
    It sounds like your bees got into a sage honey flow!
    Ernie
    Bigtime sage flow this year, Ernie. I imagine you saw the same, since you're just down the grade from me. Had white, black and purple sage, along with a ton of early buckwheat, wild lavender, on and on and on... nothing like a good rain year, right?

    The combination made for a yellow honey. Not sure that's too visually attractive, but the taste is awesome--- buttery, rich, with a subtly sweet aftertaste.

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