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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Highland, MD, USA
    Posts
    13

    Default Greetings from Muggy Maryland!

    Hi all! I'm Angie and I'm in the research phase right now. I had a wonderful experience with a nest of honeybees in a tree and it sparked my interest, so I've been looking into this hobby.

    I'm an avid wildlife gardener that doesn't use fertilizer, pesticides or anything of the sort on my property and so I'm very interested in the more natural style of beekeeping. I've been fascinated while reading The Complete Idiots Guide to Beekeeping and the blogs of the Backwards Beekeepers!!! I suspect (that like native plants) since this is the newer side to this amazing hobby that finding a local source for a regressed, untreated, local bee nuc is going to be a challenge. I also suspect that finding the style of hives that I'm most interested will be as well. I've been trying to convince my woodworking husband that he could build them but so far he's not buying it lol..

    Have a great day!
    Angie

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Queen Anne's, Maryland, USA
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Greetings from Muggy Maryland!

    Hey Ang,

    Boy is it hot out! I live in Arnold, MD, and I just started beekeeping this spring myself. I have two hives on the Eastern Shore.

    If you really want to get a hive for yourself this season I suggest trying to buy an established hive. The primary Honey-flow is ebbing right now, and since it's later in the season many people have sold out of packaged bees.

    I had a heck of a time trying to find bees in early May. I bought a starter kit from Dadant at the end of April and thought I would be able to just buy/find bees...silly me. Most people sell out for the season by January/February. April & May are the primary swarm months, so if you wanted to capture bees that's the time to do it. In the end, craigslist was a real savior: I got a bunch of responses for swarms in people's yards.

    I wouldn't try to build a hive unless you want to build a bunch of them. I have built some equipment myself, and the material cost for one or two items is always higher than if you just buy the thing outright - you'll save yourself some time and frustration too

    So long story short: try finding someone who will sell you an established colony. I'd be willing to bet you'll have lots of luck with that, especially as the summer progresses along.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Highland, MD, USA
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Greetings from Muggy Maryland!

    Thanks for the welcome and the info! I'm in no rush, I figured to order my nucs this winter and have everything set and ready for next spring. Right now I want to read and learn all I can before I make the leap. I added a lot of bee friendly plants to my already pollinator friendly garden and I'm having a fine time getting more aquainted that way lol. I also want to attend some of the meetings of the HoCo Bee Club to hopefully gain more knowledge, some connections and maybe some hands on exposure to some active hives. Might sound odd but I'm not really in it for honey or anything like that, I want to do it more to help the honeybees! I know they aren't native to the US and all but they've become part of our ecosystem and I'd hate to see them lost.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    7,010

    Default Re: Greetings from Muggy Maryland!

    Welcome, I admire your desire to keep it all natural. Foundationless and cell size regression can be challenging even for experienced beekeepers. There is quite a lot of research out of the Universities of Florida and Georgia that demonstrated small cell has no advantage. I can get you the research papers when I get home. I am in Gaithersburg, MD for the week. I have always had chemical free, natural hives.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Chester Co, PA, USA
    Posts
    269

    Default Re: Greetings from Muggy Maryland!

    Harford Community College give the Susquahanna Bee Keepers short course in the spring. Very friendly and helpfull.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Highland, MD, USA
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Greetings from Muggy Maryland!

    I've heard about the research but I also know that breeding things to be bigger is not always better and can present problems. It is logical that doing so with honeybees that weren't meant to be that size by natures design could also cause problems It may well be more of a challenge, hence why I am researching first!

    Harford is a bit far for me but thank you for the information!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    3,687

    Default Re: Greetings from Muggy Maryland!

    Hi ldygardener!

    Welcome...

    You live pretty close to queen breeder, who is also a member on here. Here is his web site:

    http://www.vpqueenbees.com/index.html

    I know what you mean about it being muggy in Maryland. My father grew up across the bay from you; he went to Sudlersville High School, and I spent a number of summers in a little crossroad's of a town called Templeville.
    BeeCurious
    5 hives and 8 nucs................... Trying to think inside the box...

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