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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    bryan, texas
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    Default staining vs painting hives

    Was thinking about getting a nuc for my back porch and thought it would look nice if it was stained... Nice one with box joints at all that..

    Was wondering if it would last as long as a painted one if i did stain + polyurathane?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Port Townsend, WA, USA
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    124

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    This has been debated in several past posts. It seems that for longevity it goes: Hot wax/resin dipping is best then Latex paints, Outdoor Stains and last various clear coats like linseed oils and varnishes. I would not use polyurethane if it will be exposed to allot of sun, as it deteriorates fairly rapidly from UV. On a sheltered porch it may be okay. If the UV gets to it then you have a mess trying to clean the surface to reapply more stain. I'm going through that with my front door. A good semi-gloss outdoor stain should work and when more is needed you can do a quick cleaning of the surface and put more right over the top. I would like to use an alternative to wax/resin dipping as has been suggested. I see a couple mixtures involving wax/linseed/turpentine and Wax/Alcohol/Propolis which is applied hot with a brush. I would be Curious to see what people recommend.
    Last edited by ehallspqr; 06-10-2010 at 01:46 PM. Reason: spelling

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Hopewell Junction, NY
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    A new beekeeper/blogger stained his, and they look terrific -- here's a link to a post in which he explains what he used. You may want to ask him how they're holding up.

    http://jaredsbees.blogspot.com/2009/...es-update.html

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Fallsburg, KY
    Posts
    302

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Heres a warre hive I finished today, Minwax stain with polyurtnene in Pecan color , cant say how long she'll hold up though.

    http://i774.photobucket.com/albums/y...n/IMG_3264.jpg
    Mike , Proverbs 24:13-14 Eat honey, my son, for it is good; honey from the comb is sweet to your taste.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Concord, CA
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    4,163

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Some of our are stained with bear deck stain. they look nice.
    Dan

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Fallsburg, KY
    Posts
    302

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    I have never heard of bear deck stain? I perfer stain over paint but not sure how long it will last. I know theres a lot of talk over everything being natural not hurting the bees. I dont intend to load it with bees until next spring, should be cured good by then.
    Mike , Proverbs 24:13-14 Eat honey, my son, for it is good; honey from the comb is sweet to your taste.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Port Townsend, WA, USA
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    124

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Yup that Minwax polyurethane does look nice on both those hives. Nice Warre by the way Mike S. Bear stains are big here on the west coast. I've used gallons of this stuff, mostly the solid satins and it holds up very well. Resist mildew which is important in our moist climate.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    bryan, texas
    Posts
    197

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Hot wax/resin dipping? never heard of it..

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Surfside Beach, SC
    Posts
    249

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Staining and applying polyurethane will look nice initially, but if you don't use an exterior marine varnish, it will eventually begin to peel as it's exposed to the damaging UV rays.

    Marine varnish stands up well, but it's not cheap. Unless you keep your hives inside and not exposed to the sun, don't use an interior poly like Minwax.
    Last edited by Tom Fran; 06-11-2010 at 07:09 AM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Port Townsend, WA, USA
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    124

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Quote Originally Posted by avalonweddingsbcs View Post
    Hot wax/resin dipping? never heard of it..
    You mix a paraffin or bees wax & Brazilian tree resin, ratio something like 4:1. Melt and mix that in a huge metal heating tank at 275 degrees or so. Then you basically deep-fry your hive bodies and other outer wood-ware in this. The wax and resin penetrates very deeply into the wood. This type of finish is natural and last a long time. Trouble is you have to find someone with a dipping setup if your a hobby Beek with only a few hives to dip. Search this site there are several post about the dipping process. Mike Bush has info on his site.

    My Minwax stained door looked great for a couple years but as the plastic component deteriorated it turned to a powdery, flaky mess. No big deal but it will be a pain to scrap that off and redo it. Semi-gloss/clear outdoor stain will fade but it doesn't need to be scraped down and prepped as much before you slap more on.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    piedmont, KS
    Posts
    242

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Quote Originally Posted by ehallspqr View Post
    YThis type of finish is natural and last a long time. Trouble is you have to find someone with a dipping setup if your a hobby Beek with only a few hives to dip. Search this site there are several post about the dipping process. Mike Bush has info on his site.
    where would one find this tree resin in sufficient quantity to do this??

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Port Townsend, WA, USA
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    124

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfpenfarm View Post
    where would one find this tree resin in sufficient quantity to do this??

    Manlake Bee supply sells it as Brazilian Gum Rosin. There are cheaper places to buy it I've heard.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Oberlin, OH
    Posts
    120

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    I am very fortunate to live near Queen Rite Colonies where I can get my wooden ware hot dipped. I would check into stains or paints for boats. Are they okay for bees? At least you could be sure it would hold up in the weather.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Issaquah,WA,USA
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    2,394

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    I am fond of oops paint from HD. 5 gallons for 10 bucks really goes along way.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
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    1,398

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    I do both. I have some that are stained that I put on last late summer/fall. They are looking great! It was mentioned here to use Cabots. That's what I use. I use the "Natural/Neutral". It is also the one that is for wood protection. Directions call for 1 coat. I apply at least 3 coats. Water just beads off of them. I have used the Cabots on pine, cedar, and cypress. The results are beautiful on all 3 woods.

    Also use oops for Lowe's. (Primer and paint.) Nothing wrong with pink primer. Usually put on at least 2 coats of primer. Have been using latex lately but have painted some recently with oil. Again, I put at least 3 coats of paint , laytex or oil. The only times I have had problems with paint is when I don't put at least 2 coats of primer, don't allow enough time for primer or paint to dry,or apply too heavy a coat of paint, especially oil.

    I can paint with latex faster than oil, but I prefer oil.

    Having said all of this, I really like the Cabots the best. No priming. Just brush on 3 or so coats and let them all dry.
    De Colores,
    Ken

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rockford, Il
    Posts
    506

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    I know this is an old thread but was wondering if anyone had "Cooked" their hive before assembly?

    Pros' would be you would no longer need such a large tank, Might be able to do most of it in a turkey fryer.

    Con's Box joints might swell or something and no longer fit together. Also I'd guess if you're gluing the joints the glue would be less effective on the wax finish than on raw wood.

    Also is there any reason to do any finishing to the frames at all?

    ~Matt

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Dane County, WI.
    Posts
    3,721

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    "Also is there any reason to do any finishing to the frames at all?"

    No no no! It's enough work already to put together and paint/stain all that woodenware! . Plus, the bees add propolis [plant resins or gums] to the frames, which protcts the hive from some invaders like bacteria, molds, yeasts, fungi, insects and other pests. ABC @ XYZ Bee Culture.

    I don't know about "cooking" before assembly.
    Last edited by Oldbee; 07-18-2010 at 10:51 AM.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Kingsley, MI. USA
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    167

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Quote Originally Posted by ehallspqr View Post
    You mix a paraffin or bees wax & Brazilian tree resin, ratio something like 4:1. Melt and mix that in a huge metal heating tank at 275 degrees or so. Then you basically deep-fry your hive bodies and other outer wood-ware in this.
    It should be noted to all reading this (as it is noted on Mr. Bush's site) that this practice is extremely dangerous. It is to be taken very seriously and the beer is to be left in the fridge until AFTER the work is done!

    Treating your hives in this way makes deep-frying whole turkeys seem like child's play.

    Evan, did you treat your cedar Warre? I've always preferred to leave them natural and they hold up really well. I would be curious to see a pic. if you did, though.

    Chris Harvey--Teakwood Organics

    www.thewarrestore.com

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Rockford, Il
    Posts
    506

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldbee View Post
    I don't know about "cooking" before assembly.
    I wasn't thinking of staining the frames but some sort of wax coating or cooking.

    I'm actually trying to figure out a way to do less work :-) If a person could just drop the bodies into a cooker that seems easier than priming and painting. On top of that I like the idea of having a natural look and if it last longer to boot that's even more of a bonus.

    Staining and poly is going to to away almost as fast as prime and paint so that doesn't seem any better.

    I like the idea of "Cooking" individual pieces because you wouldn't need a larger tank and place to heat it up.

    Problem is I'm pretty sure the fryer isn't deep enough to do the sides and I'd be concerned the fingers would warp and then the pieces wouldn't fit together.

    ~Matt

  20. #20
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Port Townsend, WA, USA
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    124

    Default Re: staining vs painting hives

    Quote Originally Posted by MJuric View Post
    was wondering if anyone had "Cooked" their hive before assembly?

    Pros' would be you would no longer need such a large tank,

    Con's Box joints might swell or something and no longer fit together. the glue would be less effective on the wax finish than on raw wood.

    ~Matt
    I was wondering the same thing. I don't see any "major" reason why this would not work. I wouldn't think the joints would swell/warp to much and if they did a little sanding perhapes, which would be a good idea anyway to make the glue stick better. I've seen used turkey fryer's for very little money at garage sales and the amount of wax/resin needed would be much less. This would be more affordable sloution for the small hobby Beeks.

    Hello Chris(Beez2010), I have the Warre I got from you sitting in my living room for the moment. Been contemplating what kind of finish, if any to put on it. Your right it is cedar so no finish is really required and I don't want to hide the beautiful natural woodgrain that cedar has. So I was thinking either a tung-oil, boat spar finish or wax/resin/solvent finish of some sort? The wax dipping would be the ultimate finish to apply when the desire is to see the natural wood grain, but too expensive to set one up to do a few hives.

    By the way, go to youtube and type in turkey fryer fire and watch the carnage. It goes without saying anybody cooking hives in a solution of hot flammable wax/resin should exercise extreme care. A little wax running down to the flame and it could get real ugly, real fast!

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