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  1. #101
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Quote Originally Posted by Deamiter View Post
    ... and you are claiming that a woman-dominated field cannot be sexist?

    Of course not. It is not dominated by anyone, so far as I know. The fact that there are many women shows that there is interest, opportunity, and success available to them as well as men. Beekeeping was long dominated by men.

    At one time it was assumed that that big bee, you know the one, was a King. What a bummer when they figured out that in bee society the men are freeloading studs, the younger females do all the work, and Mater is boss.

  2. #102
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Peter:

    Thanks for the history lesson.

    However, I think that after beekeepers managed to gather more pests and pathogens in their hives than thought humanly possible, the reaction they received from the scientific community when they asked for 'a cure' may have tested their humor:

    http://www.chiefhomeofficer.com/wp-c...en-cartoon.jpg

  3. #103
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Quote Originally Posted by peterloringborst View Post
    This last name, Roger Morse, was oft criticized for not owning a bunch of hives (he had a few) but he did more to promote bee research and researchers than anyone of his generation. The list of people who studied with him at the Dyce Lab is a Who's Who of Bee Research of the fifties through the seventies.
    My older daughter studied under Morse at Cornell, and later worked as his research assistant in the bee dept, until he died.
    The little bee returns with evening's gloom,
    To join her comrades in the braided hive... -Tennyson

  4. #104
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Quote Originally Posted by Countryboy View Post
    [I]Keith, are you suggesting that nutra-bee was developed and funded by your personal pocketbook?
    :
    Yes CB, self funded would be correct.

    CB, I will get some of the USDA charts up here soon, it will blow your mind the amount of brood that nutra-bee puts up on the chart compared to the others.

    Also, the owner of the bees runs over twenty thousand hives and sends them to Lyle Johnston which control about 50,000 hives for the almond pollination, all of this took place last fall, all of which I had no clue that the USDA was even out here.Lyle Johnston told me before the almond bloom that the bees feed Nutra-Bee took off like a rocket compare to the others.
    NUTRA-BEE feed supplements

  5. #105
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    Knox County, Ohio
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    The fact that there are many women shows that there is interest, opportunity, and success available to them as well as men. Beekeeping was long dominated by men.

    I've been posting some beekeeping related videos on YouTube. YouTube has a feature that shows you the demographics of your audience.

    I was surprised that over a quarter of my viewers are women. Most of the women are 45-54 years old, while the largest male age group is 55-64.

    Another interesting thing is there is about equal interest among men and women from the ages of 13-34. If the women get into bees beyond watching videos, the days of beekeeping being male dominated will be long over.

  6. #106
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    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Peter said:
    You would think to listen to them, beekeepers invented everything themselves, made all the major discoveries, but somehow neglected to get the patents and somebody else got rich.

    Ironically, that did happen to Langstroth.


    OK, lets look at history.(correct me if I am wrong)
    You mentioned Langstroth - Bee space, movable frame?
    Moses Quimby - bellows Smoker?
    Somebody from Fond du LAc Wisconsin -rotary Foundation mill?
    Maj Hruska? - centrifugal extractor
    And last, I have a Pop quiz for you- Who invented the bee blower?(the 2 answers are in the question).

    How many of these are researchers, and how many are beekeepers?


    Roland

  7. #107
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Quote Originally Posted by peterloringborst View Post
    I started this thread with the premise...
    Seriously, I'm still a little confused about the title. Is it intended as "An ideal beekeeper's world", or "A beekeeper's ideal world"?
    The little bee returns with evening's gloom,
    To join her comrades in the braided hive... -Tennyson

  8. #108
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    Ennis, TX USA
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    Big Grin Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Quote Originally Posted by Keith Jarrett View Post
    Nutra-Bee was field tested (survey) by the USDA bee lab (Jeff Pedis group ) it avg 5 times more brood than the other subs.
    Wish I knew of a place I could buy less than a truck load.
    Last edited by Hambone; 05-05-2010 at 07:07 AM.
    Chuck Norris has a grizzly bear carpet in his room. The bear isn't dead it is just afraid to move.

  9. #109
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    http://www.nature.com/nature/journal...ture05260.html

    The above is the link to the Honeybee Genome article in 'Nature'.

    If you take the trouble to look it over, you'll start to get a better feel for what someone like myself would consider to be cutting edge science.

    How many of the research scientists could be called beekeepers? I'd venture a guess that they are mostly specialists.

    So, when you come up with things like 'bee blowers' as an example of science, you might want to set your sights a little bit higher.

  10. #110
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Quote Originally Posted by Omie View Post
    Seriously, I'm still a little confused about the title. Is it intended as "An ideal beekeeper's world", or "A beekeeper's ideal world"?
    A beekeeper's ideal world would be an ideal world. No pests=no pesticides. The bees would only sting my neighbors; never me. The hives would all have tubing, like you see in maple sugar farms, with which all the sweet stuff gravity flows to the sugar shack.

    There would be no such thing as sugar, so everyone would put honey in their coffee; drink mead instead of beer or wine. For those in need of harder stuff: homemade honey moonshine. All food would require bee pollination, of course, so we would be completely indispensable instead of nearly so.

  11. #111
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Ok Dick, The beekeeper that used Nutra-Bee in these charts is the second to the right "circled" I whited his name out.

    The first chart is the strenght of frames of bees & the second chart is the CM of brood.

    This was done by the USDA Jeff Pedis group.

    What is the HUGE part is that he is at the lower bottom with frame strengh of bees, but at the TOP when it comes to brood.

    P.S. Bone, coming out with 50lb bag dry mix soon.







    NUTRA-BEE feed supplements

  12. #112
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Thanks for posting that chart Keith. It's keepers like you and Ernie that continue to pay large out of pocket dollars and endless hours of trials that help us little guys out. Thanks!!

    Can't wait until I can buy a 50lbs sack.
    Chuck Norris has a grizzly bear carpet in his room. The bear isn't dead it is just afraid to move.

  13. #113
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Quote Originally Posted by peterloringborst View Post
    Well spoken by someone who hasn't kept bees in the north. We don't use different bees in the north and the south of the US. That's nonsense. Bees have been moving back and forth for centuries and there aren't special northern bees and inferior southern bees.

    The bees of the US evolved in temperate Europe and are capable of withstanding a typical winter up to a certain latitude. Farther north sheds are used.

    I have personally run bees for years that were raised in Georgia. These winter just as well as mongrels from the woods. The idea that bees could acclimate to a region in a few decades is proof of complete ignorance of how evolution and acclimation work, most especially as applied to honey bees.

    Furthermore, I personally find the expression "sissy" to be offensive, as it implies that sisters are somehow weaker than real men. That kind of talk is not welcome in a modern non-sexist world.
    Wow Pete;
    Did you really mean to call me ignorant and offensive?

    Dickm

    Thinking Positive means being wrong at the top of your lungs.

  14. #114
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    I don't know what has become of this thread.

    First we hear that the experience of many serious northern (and I mean northern) beekeepers who have found that many (not all) southern-bred bees won't winter up to snuff or at all in the north -- the real north are misguided.

    Then Keith claims that he is self-made when he has milked the rest of us for info which we gave him freely, then refused to share -- anything. He proceeds to immediately post a chart to advertise his product (against the forum rules as I understand them) and we see that the chart alarmingly suggests to those of us who know bees and can read charts, the opposite of what he derives from it...

    Can't we get back on topic?

  15. #115
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    I just had a quick question. (I almost wish I hadn't clicked on this thread).

    Is this topic basically about -when you throw all the clutter out and really look at what people are saying (back and forth) and what the strongly let drop in insinuations - is the idea of "religion" or "beliefs" in general pitted against science - how it makes the scientific work harder to do. And how the originator of this topic sees them at odds every day on this forum?

    Just wondering because as I read some of the posts that seemed to be the bedrock under this topic. That wasn't covered up well sometimes.

    Thanks

  16. #116
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Allen,

    You asked for proof, "5 times more brood" the charts support that claim.

    I only brought out those charts to support what I had wrote.
    NUTRA-BEE feed supplements

  17. #117
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Quote Originally Posted by dickm View Post
    Wow Pete;
    Did you really mean to call me ignorant and offensive? Dickm
    No, I didn't. I am very sorry for the implication, Dick. Please accept my sincere apologies. I was just in a bad mood, after seeing my "hero" George Imirie disrespected, so I guess I was channeling him ...

    Your friend
    Pete

  18. #118
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeJ View Post
    Is this topic basically about -when you throw all the clutter out and really look at what people are saying (back and forth) and what the strongly let drop in insinuations - is the idea of "religion" or "beliefs" in general pitted against science - how it makes the scientific work harder to do. And how the originator of this topic sees them at odds every day on this forum?
    Yes

  19. #119
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    After reading the chart, I am curious about what happened to categories A. G. and E frame counts?

    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  20. #120
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    Default Re: An ideal beekeepers' world

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeJ View Post
    I just had a quick question. (I almost wish I hadn't clicked on this thread).

    Is this topic basically about -when you throw all the clutter out and really look at what people are saying (back and forth) and what the strongly let drop in insinuations - is the idea of "religion" or "beliefs" in general pitted against science - how it makes the scientific work harder to do. And how the originator of this topic sees them at odds every day on this forum?

    Just wondering because as I read some of the posts that seemed to be the bedrock under this topic. That wasn't covered up well sometimes.

    Thanks

    This Thread is getting to be more like a Tailgater Thread every day.
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