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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Augusta,GA
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    I keep hearing people who say they use a SSB with no wood bottom. I live in GA where the summer temps routinely reach the high 90's with humidity of 80 percent or more. Wouldn't that be like running the air conditioner with the windows open

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Posts
    248

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    Quote Originally Posted by tjtll View Post
    I keep hearing people who say they use a SSB with no wood bottom. I live in GA where the summer temps routinely reach the high 90's with humidity of 80 percent or more. Wouldn't that be like running the air conditioner with the windows open
    My gut-feeling says that in your climate, I would have gone for a top-entrance and possibly a vent-hole at the back. Or a bottom entrance and some sort of chimney or top-ventilation.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Augusta,GA
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    Thanks for the tip, I am still in the process of building my top bar hive, so I will take that into consideration. I have been going back and forth as to wether to go with a top entrance or not. But it seems that most people have a bottom one. I was thinking of using the hole and cork method and having both top and bottom entrances and just watching the bees to see which one if any they prefered.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Posts
    248

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    Sounds like a great idea to use the corked entrances. It will make it flexible so that you can decide as time goes by.

    BTW: I forgot to add a little disclaimer. I am waiting for my first bees, so my opinions does not have real bee-experience backing.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Dalkeith, Ont, Canada
    Posts
    206

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    Quote Originally Posted by buckbee View Post
    It is a problem in ANY hive - not particular to the TBH.



    I agree - in that sort of climate you may well have to provide water for bees.



    In that situation, you may need to keep excess heat OUT ratehr than in, to avoid meltdown - so insulation is still needed.



    Condensation can be dealt with by having good insulation, that also absorbs moisture. Think permeable - like glass fibre loft insulation. I and others have successfully used the Warré-style condensation trap - a shallow box with a mesh floor, filled with wood shavings and sawdust - or some other naturally absorbent/insulating material.

    The floor is where more thought needs to be applied, IMO. I have successfully over-wintered a colony in a TBH with no floor at all, through two cold (last one -11C) winters in a generally damp climate, and my ventilated floor colonies have always been better than closed floor.

    Tubes arranged on a frame, with 3mm gaps have been used (I think in France) and this may be worth looking at.

    I stand by my opinion - at least in my climate - top insulation, bottom ventilation is the way to go in a TBH - or any hive.
    Nice, the one thing that was bothering me was leaving so much ventilation in the floors of my hives (7x 7/8" holes) through the winter, this sets my mind at ease a lot knowing some one has actually tried this 100% open floor in moderately cold weather. I use construction cloth thats 1/8" holes for the screen, that should keep skunks, badgers, rats, wasps ect out and let the verroa drop without getting cloged with debris.

    Sam.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    227

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    I put a 1 1/4" entrance hole at the bottom because the Cornell research indicated that its what a new swarm prefer. I think that a round hole without a ledge is the easiest entrance for the bees to defend. I also put holes at the top for ventilation, but have them corked for now.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Dolny Kubin, Slovakia, EU
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation


  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    powell wy
    Posts
    99

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    here is what i used for my tbh and works very well, the bottom is hinged so i can swing it closed in the winter and open it up in the summer when it gets hot, my thought was the girls cannot make honey if they haft to sit around fanning the air to control the temp


    all it took was a couple old hinges,a couple screen door hooks, a section of old window screen and some junk wood.
    even here in wyoming when the wind blows and it gets way cold they seemed happy and snug in there little domicile.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,213

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    I have only a top entrance and no venilation problems...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Dalkeith, Ont, Canada
    Posts
    206

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    I have only a top entrance and no venilation problems...
    Are you using the bar space at one end for an entrance?
    My blog @ Bee Crazy

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Augusta,GA
    Posts
    22

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    all I have is four 3/4 inch holes just above the SBB with 2 of them plugged for now as my package is about 5 weeks old. As it gets hotter, I thought about either drilling some more maybe an inch or so down from the bottom of the bars or maybe just pulling the 1/4" spacer between the front and the first bar. Which would you do.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    nelsonville, ohio
    Posts
    383

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    i use vented top bars and a quilt box to absorb the moistire.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    carrollton mississippi
    Posts
    113

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    duplicate
    Last edited by duck_nutt; 05-17-2010 at 11:11 AM. Reason: duplicate

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    carrollton mississippi
    Posts
    113

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    I recently built a TBH for an older gentleman who recently had triple bypass..he had let his bees go due to his health, but just wanted one good hive to 'play' with. I told him that a TBH would be a good solution. I build him one from the pictures I've seen on the web. But I had to modify some things because he couldn't lift any weight. So I built a roof (a frame)on the hive with hinges on the back so he wouldn't have to lift it completely...but all that empty space ibn the roof scared me, even with tight top bars, so I added a piece of 1 inch styrofoam insulation that was attached to the roof, but came down tight against the bars when closed..I told him this was an insulation/space reducer....he bought it...the bottom was covered with 1/4 hardware. I didn't put any entrances in it because that kind of depended where he was going to place it...I built it to look nice around the house...so he could keep it close by. we'll see how it works.....15 inched wide at the top...5 inches at the bottom...42 inches long.

    on the bars, I cut a 1/16 inch grove down the3 middle 1/4 inch deep and inserted a 1/2 strip into it as a guide...then melted a thin layer of beeswax on each strip

    all he needs is bees now!

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia, USA
    Posts
    227

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    I love the idea of hinges on the lid. I use hinges on the bottom and its very convenient. Though I wouldn't use styrofoam (isn't moisture permeable). I'd use polystyrene instead so the moisture can wick out the top.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    carrollton mississippi
    Posts
    113

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    yes, after reading here, the styrofoam might not be the best material for the job..might have to get hi tech and add an electric motor with a small fan in the roof to pull air thru and out of it!!


    j/k of course!

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,213

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    >Are you using the bar space at one end for an entrance?


    It's the left over space when you fill it with bars... usually between 3/8" and 1"...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Spotsylvania,VA
    Posts
    77

    Default Re: Top Bar Ventilation

    Hi Zonker,

    I am wondering if you have any pictures of your TBH that you could/would post? I am interested to see how the roof and insulation look. I would like to insulate mine for the winter months. Is Polystyrene the same as what is refered to as Dow foam?

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