Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 34 of 34
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fairfield, Virginia
    Posts
    1,002

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    I have used popcycle stick, nothing, and starter strips. Most of the time no problem but sometimes they draw crazy. Then again sometimes I have them draw crazy with foundation. I like to use starter strips in my hive bodies but have trouble getting the bees to draw starter strips out in honey supers and I revert back to foundation.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Van Nuys, California, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    Thanks, countryboy for your reply.
    I have 10 frames in the box. I guess I measured "almost 1 1/2 inches" because of some build-up on the frames.
    Shaving the end bars down to 1 1/4 is really something that would work. But, I have not told the whole story. I guess maybe I feel kind of insecure about this, but I really want to make an experiment with a hive that has one large brood box, consisting of one deep and one medium box with the bars ONLY across the top. This brood box would be left completely alone, never be opened. Kind of like a home in a tree trunk or similar cavity. Then on top of that would go medium supers with starter strips for honey storage, of which the first one also would not be touched but left for the bees in winter. So, if I make my own bars I guess that's the measurement I will make them then; 22 mm, with 10 mm spacing, adding up to 1 1/4 inch. I have no idea what will happen but I'm willing to find out. I'm not really into honey production, just want to have some happy bees living in my yard. Any thoughts ?

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Alberta Canada
    Posts
    233

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    Quote Originally Posted by woollybee View Post
    but I really want to make an experiment with a hive that has one large brood box, consisting of one deep and one medium box with the bars ONLY across the top. This brood box would be left completely alone, never be opened. Kind of like a home in a tree trunk or similar cavity.
    what do you plan on telling the inspector when he happins by

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,336

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    If you use no foundation and no comb guide, yes. If you use a comb guide you'll probably get less than with plastic foundation...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Van Nuys, California, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    O-0h! Inspectors? I don't think they bother backyard beekeepers around here. Holding fingers crossed.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Dexter, Maine
    Posts
    1,037

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    No need to ever look in there, who cares if you are spreading FOUL BROOD, no big deal.

    I mean there is a reason we have inspectors.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Van Nuys, California, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    I have to appologize. I am definitely very ignorant about a lot of issues concerning beekeeping. Will read up on it and get more informed. Seriously, I hear you.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Knox County, Ohio
    Posts
    2,694

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    You could just get a hollow log and put a swarm in it. People used to keep bees in bee gums, as they are called.

    I have seen gums with a Langstroth super on top. The bees were storing honey in it.

    The bee inspector only inspects hives that are registered. Around here, not all bee yards are registered.

    We don't have Africanized honey bees around here, and AFB isn't common. I know people who have cut down bee trees and set up the log with the bees in it at their house. They call it a wild, feral, unmanaged hive, and our bee inspector doesn't argue with them.

    Bee trees aren't that hard to find around here. Personally, I don't see any difference between a bee gum or a bee tree in your backyard.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Van Nuys, California, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    Yes, exactly, a log with bees in it, a wild, unmanaged, feral hive. That's the idea. Not much chance here though to locate something like that. Here you find hives in water meter boxes, street signs, signs of businesses, all kinds of weird places. Not many old trees though. We're in the city. So, therefore the idea of creating something similar, next best thing.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Knox County, Ohio
    Posts
    2,694

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    The bees there seem to think the next best thing is water meter boxes, street signs, signs of businesses, all kinds of weird places.

    You could find a section of a hollow log to use for ornamental purposes in your yard...and accidentally drop some old dark combs in the bottom of the log, along with some swarm lure.

    Just out of curiousity - do you have Africanized bees in your area? If you end up with AHB, how do you plan on requeening the colony if you can't manage the combs? Kill the whole colony?

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA, USA
    Posts
    176

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    Quote Originally Posted by mrspock View Post
    From [url] Is this true? I'm planning to go foundationless, but need inspectable frames...

    I currently have 4 hives, all foundationless. I started with one frame of fully drawn comb in the center of each hive at package installation (from the previous years dead hive). You could use a frame with a sheet of foundation as well. As they started drawing the adjacent frames I would check and be sure they were getting it drawn straight. I probably had to realign the very first inch or two of comb maybe 4 times on the 4 hives. After that there was no problems at all. No attempts at cross comb, only starting to build comb at the edge of the wedge I installed, not on the pointed center part of the wedge. As you may have read the hive has to be perfectly level. Especially from side to side or you could really have a mess.
    As far as having the comb fall out of a frame, just don't get in the habit of reading the comb like a book and just learn to lift it a little higher to eye level or, like foundation, wire up the frame. As it is a little harder to realign the new comb with wire in the way, getting the hive level is even more important. People with all medium boxes commonly don't wire the foundationless frame at all and even some people with deeps don't do it. I'm going to start using 20 gauge fishing line instead of wire and see how that goes. Solves a number of things I don't like about wire.
    ~Reid

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA, USA
    Posts
    176

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    Quote Originally Posted by woollybee View Post
    ...but I really want to make an experiment with a hive that has one large brood box, consisting of one deep and one medium box with the bars ONLY across the top. This brood box would be left completely alone, never be opened. Kind of like a home in a tree trunk or similar cavity. Then on top of that would go medium supers with starter strips for honey storage, of which the first one also would not be touched but left for the bees in winter. . . . .Any thoughts ?
    This has and is already being done and what's you're basically discribing, excluding the obvious differences, is a Warre-style hive in a Langstroth box. Check out this link below. Nice pictures of a full sized, fully transparent, observation Warre hive so you can see exactly what the bees would do without side bars.
    http://warre.biobees.com/

    I can't speak to it's acceptability as a movable frame hive as require by most regulators nor can I speak to it's supposed superiority based on it's attempt at a more natural, tree-like, hive design. What is obvious are the limitations such a system would likely impose on all the useful manipulations and observations beekeepers commonly make. I considered Warre hives when starting out, but feel that foundationless Lang. equipment is a happy medium and works for me.
    ~Reid

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA, USA
    Posts
    176

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?


    I almost forgot about Dennis's site!
    The link below is his take on the pros, cons with Ware-style hives with some great pictures:
    http://beenatural.wordpress.com/natu...al-comb-hives/
    ~Reid

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Van Nuys, California, USA
    Posts
    24

    Default Re: Does foundationless langstroth cause cross-comb?

    Bee trees, bee gums, hollow logs to lure bees, old style Dadant frames, Warre hives! What wonderful posts, so inspiring! Never realized all this is out there.Thanks so much to all. Lots to study and think about now.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads