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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Clifford Township, PA
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    1,864

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Quote Originally Posted by deknow View Post
    hmmm, from a buddhist viewpoint, are you able to make a distinction between the lives of the bees in a hive, and the lives of the mites that are on the bees, or the nosema cultures in the bees gut?
    Buddhists do make distinctions between various life forms and the basic precept of not taking the life of a living thing generally involves sentient beings, according to my, admittedly, limited understanding of Buddhism. Buddhists, (even non-closeted ones like Peter and myself) will take medicines that kill viruses. Buddhists are not ignorant people that will not take steps to protect themselves, their crops or their livestock.

    Interestingly, vegetarianism is not not a mandate or precept of Buddhism.

    Wayne

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ithaca, NY USA
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    1,343

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Well spoken. I am against unnecessary killing and I most certainly do not believe in war. I take personal responsibility for the killing that I do and that which is done on my behalf.

    I believe that all life is sacred, but it turns out we have to kill to eat. Unless you are one of those folks who eats only roadkills and windfalls. If you are, I salute you! May you prosper!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,543

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    wayne and peter,

    yes, i am familiar with at least some of the basics...but that is my point. i think that basic buddhist principles would recognize that by "helping" the bees they are also "killing" the microbes and the mites, neither of which is more valuable than the other...and not make claims that both the helping and the killing (which are a result of the same act) are being done on buddhist principles....but out of some degree of practical necessity.

    but please correct me if i'm wrong.

    deknow

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Newport, New Hampshire, USA
    Posts
    241

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Quote Originally Posted by deknow View Post
    hmmm, from a buddhist viewpoint, are you able to make a distinction between the lives of the bees in a hive, and the lives of the mites that are on the bees, or the nosema cultures in the bees gut?

    do you somehow justify that the bees are more important?

    deknow
    A potato told him.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,161

    Lightbulb Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Quote Originally Posted by peterloringborst View Post
    For successful beekeeping, I think the things that I think matter most (in order) are:

    1. Location
    How about #1 Knowledge
    NUTRA-BEE feed supplements

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Worcester County, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,543

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Quote Originally Posted by BoBn View Post
    A potato told him.
    ...or was it the french fries on aqua teen hunger force?

    deknow

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ithaca, NY USA
    Posts
    1,343

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    How about #1 Knowledge
    Of course, that was implicit. Without knowledge, we can't even make the list, let alone prioritize it.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,161

    Lightbulb Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Quote Originally Posted by peterloringborst View Post
    Of course, that was implicit. Without knowledge, we can't even make the list, let alone prioritize it.
    Many commercial keepers lack knowledge. They have everything on your list , look no futher to the mess here in Calif almonds.
    NUTRA-BEE feed supplements

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ithaca, NY USA
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    1,343

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Many commercial keepers lack knowledge.
    This is a sore point. I have worn many hats in my life. I have done large scale commercial beekeeping, was a full time sideliner (500 hives), worked in honey bee research, had a few hives in the yard.

    So, I have a deep sympathy for each one of these paths and their particular problems. I don't know if you were in Florida, but there was a group which was made up of all types.

    But generally, these factors tend to flock together and view the others with suspicion. As a member of the state association, I have heard commercials say they don't go to meetings because it's all hobbyists. And small timers say they don't go because it's all big timers. So the meetings are poorly attended.

    Of course, you can't be all things to all people. But my personal challenge is to facilitate the flow of knowledge from one faction to another, with a special emphasis on what works. I think that the commercial pollinators are the angels of agriculture.

    But the sideliners help keep alive the love of the hive, with its art and rich history. I have joined this group at BeeSource to plow head-on into the problems of beekeeping in the 21st century. Do I think I have all the answers? Of course not, but as a group, we may have all the answers -- or at least a way to find them

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Monroeville Pa
    Posts
    188

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Peter said:
    "I think that the commercial pollinators are the angels of agriculture"

    I think they are no more angels of agriculture than Cargill.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Clifford Township, PA
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    1,864

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Quote Originally Posted by laurelmtnlover View Post

    I think they are no more angels of agriculture than Cargill.
    Interesting comment, in an uninformative, sound-bite sort of way.

    Wayne
    Last edited by waynesgarden; 02-14-2010 at 09:02 PM.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Amador County, Calif
    Posts
    3,161

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Quote Originally Posted by peterloringborst View Post
    . I think that the commercial pollinators are the angels of agriculture.
    Well said Pete,
    But , me thinks that there are alot more ghost than angels.

    what do..... ghost,angels & some pollinating bees(almonds) have in common.

    you can talk about them but you can't see them.
    NUTRA-BEE feed supplements

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Knox County, Ohio
    Posts
    2,694

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    For successful beekeeping, I think the things that I think matter most (in order) are:

    1. Location
    2. Management
    3. Quality of bees
    4. All the various equipment issues (frames, box size, fdn, etc.)
    5. Alignment of the stars


    What determines success is successful beekeeping?

    I know of a few feral colonies near me. Location is opportunistic - colonies in hollow trees, and colonies in walls of abandoned farmhouses. (also discounts equipment issues - they use what is available.) I don't get any honey from them. The colony in the old house is aggressive, and will sting you up if you try to get close enough to watch their entrance. They are unmanaged colonies. Yet, they are successful enough to keep themselves alive so far.

    I try to manage my colonies. I invest my hard earned dollars into them. If I was unable to harvest any honey or gain a return on my investment, I would NOT consider that to be successful beekeeping.

    The feral bees keep themselves successfully. But if my own hives had the same level of success, I would not feel that I was successfully keeping bees. So what is successful beekeeping?

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Ithaca, NY USA
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    1,343

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Quote Originally Posted by Countryboy View Post
    [I] What determines success is successful beekeeping?
    That depends entirely on your goal. If your goal is to make a living and you don't: no success. If your goal is to have enough honey to sell to pay for the equipment you want to buy and you do: success.

    If your goal is to pollinate 5 crops a year and show a profit, and you do: success. If your goal is to pollinate your cherry trees in the yard, and you don't: no success.

    Beekeeping is everything from one hive for fun to 10,000 as big business. Success is achieving whatever your goal is. If it's an unrealistic goal, you'll never succeed.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    1,398

    Default Re: Bee Lovers Unite

    Success to me in beekeeping is knowing more than I did the year before and using the knowledge to grow the amount of colonies I possess.

    Success to me isn't based on the amount of losses I incurred in 2009 or this winter. This was my second year. I had never captured a swarm, done a cutout or trap out. In my second year I captured over 25 swarms did 5 cutout and 4 trapouts. I also made around 5 splits. So I learned a lot.

    Had a lot of losses but gained comb, experience, wisdom, and actually got to eat some of my own honey. I lost a lot of money this year keeping bees, but the all of the gaines in the previous sentance and just my sheer joy in keeping bees helps take the sting out of money I really can't afford to loose.
    Last edited by USCBeeMan; 02-14-2010 at 08:54 PM.
    De Colores,
    Ken

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