Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 25 of 25
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Walker County, Texas
    Posts
    201

    Default Re: Can "some" hives in a bee yard be natural/untreated?

    My self I know for a fact,You keep your hive strong and all natural,you have no CCD. Has anyone lost a strong natural hive,speak up.
    Last edited by Cordovan Italian Bee; 02-12-2010 at 08:48 PM. Reason: spelling
    Before man took over bees there was nature,it did a better job.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,321

    Default Re: Can "some" hives in a bee yard be natural/untreated?

    There is no reason you can't keep hives that are treated in a yard with hives that are not. The problem is, what conclusions can you draw from the results?

    "The percentage of foragers originating from different colonies within the apiary ranged from 32 to 63 percent"--from a paper, published in 1991 by Walter Boylan-Pett and Roger Hoopingarner in Acta Horticulturae 288, 6th Pollination Symposium (see Jan 2010 edition of Bee Culture, 36)

    I'd say few Varroa spend their entire life in the same hive if 1/3 to 2/3 of the bees in a hive originated in a different hive... and was that hive treated or untreated?
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,099

    Default Re: Can "some" hives in a bee yard be natural/untreated?

    It looks to me like the biggest problem wouldn't be from drifting, but from the mingling of genetics over a few years time.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Beer's Settlement, NY USA
    Posts
    1,313

    Default Re: Can "some" hives in a bee yard be natural/untreated?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    I'd say few Varroa spend their entire life in the same hive if 1/3 to 2/3 of the bees in a hive originated in a different hive... and was that hive treated or untreated?
    I found that figure to be a little remarkable. I have had colonies of different strains side by side. I have had carniolans, italians, even some very blonde italians, in yards with 20 to 30 hives. Such drifting as described above would be very noticeable. We never saw drifting to that extent.

    Now, there are a lot of things that affect drifting. Drifting is a lot more common during a heavy honey flow. In our yards at the Dyce Lab we always went to great length to minimize drifting. We placed colonies pretty far apart by most standards. They were set in pairs about 2 meters from the next pair, not cheek to jowl like you sometimes see.

    Below is more recent work on drifting and its effect on varroa transmission. Like I said earlier, I think crashing hives are dispersing away from their home apiaries and distributing mites in that fashion. Unfortunately, nobody has really done the work that would nail this question

    The average percentage of bees drifting from untreated hives infested with varroa into neighbouring treated hives did not exceed 3%. There were no significant differences between the percentage of drifting bees from the varroa-infested colonies and the treated colonies at any stage throughout the trial. This suggests that the reinfestation of treated colonies does not predominantly result from heavy varroa infestations causing worker bees to drift to other colonies, more than they generally do in practically varroa-free colonies. The normal level of drift in apiaries will, however, spread varroa from untreated to treated colonies. This observation supports the practice of treating all colonies in an apiary simultaneously.

    Drift of Varroa destructor-infested worker honey bees to neighbouring colonies
    R M Goodwin, M A Taylor*, H M Mcbrydie and H M Cox
    The Horticulture and Food Research Institute of New Zealand Ltd, Private Bag 3123, Hamilton, New Zealand.
    our results indicate that if performance testing is done in apiaries where the layout reduces the level of drifting workers to an average level of less than 5% there is no significant effect on evaluating performance data of colonies. Even high levels of drifting drones which are not affected by the apiary layout seem to be a minor factor only for evaluating quantitative performance data of honeybee colonies.

    Colony evaluation is not affected by drifting of drone and worker honeybees (Apis mellifera L.)at a performance testing apiary
    Peter NEUMANN, et al in Apidologie 31 (2000) 67–79 67

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Poplar Bluff, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    2,280

    Default Re: Can "some" hives in a bee yard be natural/untreated?

    brac, several posts have attempted to address your question.
    I have a question in return, for the purpose of clarification.
    WHY would you want to do two different management practices, and in the same apiary? If you simply want to see which is easiest, that's one thing. If you want to see which is most effective, that is another matter entirely.

    As several have posted, if you're experimenting to see which management style is best for a) you and b) your bees, then it seems to draw the best conclusions you'd need to do it in two different yards. And not only that, but if you have more than one strain of bees in your yard, you'd want to have all strains in both yards, for a more accurate comparision. Further, I would think you'd want them on the same kind of forage. The more you can make the two apiaries identical, the more accurate your conclusions about the different management practices.

    If you do this, please post your progress, and your end-of-season conclusions. It would certainly be very educational and informative.
    Thanks!
    Steven
    "If all you have is a hammer, the whole world is a nail." - A.H. Maslow

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads