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  1. #1
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    Santa Cruz, CA
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    Default Foulbrood spores

    I read some time ago in a paper I can't point back to at this time that heating equipment above 300 degrees F. for at least one half hour will kill foulbrood spores. Can any of you confirm this for me?

    Thanks. -jeff

  2. #2
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    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    Burn any comb with foulbrood. You can scorch the bare boxes inside if you have one of those blow touch burners. Just make sure you do a good job otherwise you will spread it to the next bunch of bees you hive.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Perez View Post
    I read some time ago in a paper I can't point back to at this time that heating equipment above 300 degrees F. for at least one half hour will kill foulbrood spores. Can any of you confirm this for me?

    Thanks. -jeff
    Nope, sorry, I can't. How would you do that? An autoclave? Do you have one big enuf?
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  4. #4
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    If it's worth pursuing, I'd build a solar oven large enough for a deep super. I've got one I use for cooking with. It gets close to 400 degrees F. on a warm sunny day.

    Jeff

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    Do you have equipment that came from AFB hives? What is the root of your inquiry?
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  6. #6

    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    save your self lot of head ache burn the equipment save you money in long run.
    Don

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Plant City, Florida
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    I have this whole document PM me with your e-mail and I can e-mail to you
    Bob

    Disinfection of wooden structures contaminated
    with Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae spores
    W. Dobbelaere1,2, D.C. de Graaf1, W. Reybroeck3, E. Desmedt2, J.E. Peeters1
    and F.J. Jacobs2
    1Veterinary and Agrochemical Research Centre, Brussels, 2Laboratory for Zoophysiology, University of Ghent,
    Ghent, 3Department Animal Product Quality, Agricultural Research Centre ± Ghent, Melle, Belgium
    723/01/01: received 12 January 2001, revised 2 March 2001 and accepted 2 March 2001
    W. DOBBELAERE, D.C. DE GRAAF, W. REYBROECK, E. DESMEDT, J.E. PEETERS
    AND F. J . JACOBS. 2001.
    Aims: The aim of the study is to examine the disinfection of wood contaminated with
    Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae spores, in order to ®nd a practical decontamination method
    for hive materials.
    Methods and Results: The number of viable spores recovered after the treatment, on the
    surface by swabbing, and in the deeper parts of the wood by scraping, was used to test the
    ef®ciency of the disinfection. Our results indicate that chemical disinfection is only complete
    when high concentrations (> 50%) of the disinfectant are used. Heat treatment in general was
    found to be very effective. The scorching of wood was not satisfactory as it only killed spores at
    the surface.
    Conclusions: Complete disinfection is only possible with some heat treatments or by using
    high concentrations of chemical disinfectants.
    Signi®cance and Impact of the Study: This study puts forward some methods that can
    provide complete decontamination, which is necessary for an effective control of American
    foulbrood disease.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    I have a questionable hive right now - I sent a sample of the comb to the Beltsville MD Bee Research Lab.

    My practice has been to burn the combs and frames then scorch the hive body, top, and screened bottom. If heating the equipment in a solar oven is sufficient I'd do that instead. I would also treat older equipment prophylactically. I live in a residential area. Burning isn't always the best option.

    Thanks.

    Jeff

  9. #9
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    Feb 2009
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    Knox County, Ohio
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    2,692

    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    I talked to the retired State bee inspector a year or so ago. He said that he was seeing AFB on 2% of colonies. These hives are treated with chemicals medicines to control AFB.

    He said Grandpa used a quart of diesel fuel and a match, and kept AFB occurrences at less than 1/2 of 1%. (less than 1/4 present rate of occurrence.)

    A quart of diesel, a hive, and a match give you a temperaure in excess of 300 degrees - and yes, it effectively destroys AFB spores. One half hour of this should be sufficient.

  10. #10
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    Jun 2009
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    Montgomery County, NY
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    Last time I had FB I shoved the whole box frames and all in my outside wod boiler. Fantastic heat source for the house. It kept the water hot for the whole day and no mess as it all burned up except nails and wire. I can see the quart of diesel as well. Personally I would use a 1/2 pint vice the entire quart. However the quart is equally effective.

  11. #11
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    Santa Cruz, CA
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    I read the paper mentioned earlier in this thread, "Disinfection of wooden structures contaminated with Paenibacillus larvae subsp. larvae spores". Paste the title into a google search and you'll find several links to the paper. I learned two things I'll share here. The paper is an interesting and short read. Check it out.

    Small pine wood blocks were inoculated with foul brood spores suspended in liquid, then allowed to dry for two days at room temperature. The blocks were then subjected to various decontamination tests. The two of primary interest to me were scorching with a roofing torch, and heating in an oven. Blocks that were scorched were 100% decontaminated on the surface, BUT there were significant numbers of viable spores remaining internally. Baking the blocks in an oven at 160 degrees Centigrade (320 degrees F) killed everything, surface and internal.

    So, a quart of diesel and a match works better than scorching, assuming spores under hive conditions migrate beneath the wood surfaces. And baking in an oven for two hours would be a lot more work, but apparently effective, according to this paper. At least I could save the frames.

    Any one know if foulbrood spores move inside the wood under hive conditions?

    Jeff

  12. #12
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    Jan 2008
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    Faulkner Manitoba, Canada
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    Yes, especially frames. If you are going to scortch the boxes, burn the frames if there is no guarantee....MEANING....several years of test results from an independant lab....a lab that tests bees for disease....do not use the frames. The spores get into the wood

  13. #13
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    May 2008
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    Bacillus larva spores are everywhere, including colonies with out symptoms. They are on the wood, wax, and probably in the brood cells themselves. But no symptoms occur, in other words the bee larva develop and mature normally. It is only when the spore count reaches very high numbers that the bee larva will begin to break down. As the larva rot, the spores reproduce by the millions and remain in the scale, spreading the infection. If the colony is strong enough to store honey, it becomes contaminated, and robbing can quickly transfer the infection. But the mere presence of spores in the wood itself is of no practical consequence.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Perez View Post
    Any one know if foulbrood spores move inside the wood under hive conditions?
    Jeff
    I doubt that there are any spores IN the wood. If there are, they aren't available to the bees. On the wood, yes. In the wood, no. IMO.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  15. #15
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    It is only when the spore count reaches very high numbers
    [AND THE BEE LARVAE BEING INFECTED ARE THE PROPER AGE] that the bee larva will begin to break down.
    Right Tom?
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  16. #16
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    I think so Mark, 2-3 day old larva.

    Or is it 5-6 day old. I can't remember. But there is a specific window when they are susceptible.
    Last edited by Tom G. Laury; 01-23-2010 at 06:35 PM.

  17. #17
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    Brightwater,Nelson,New Zealand
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    Default Re: Foulbrood spores

    Here in New Zealand we aren't allowed to treat AFB with chemicals the only approved way of treating a hive with AFB is by blocking the hive up so no bees can escape and pouring petrol over the frames then shutting it up and waiting for them to die after that the frames are burnt and the remains of the fire are covered with dirt, for the box's excluders and other woodware they are dipped in a wax dipper for 10 minutes at 160 degrees Celcius both the time and the temperature are very important.
    Never wash your gear in water and bleach and assume it's ok because if there's AFB present it's a sure fire way to spread it through everything you put in that solution.
    Cheers Frazz

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