Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 54
  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    clayton cal.
    Posts
    199

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    it is a new fanamona-aprarentley from pollen exposed to chlorothalonil
    which is a fungicide (brand name BRAVO) it indicates a microbial imbalance in the making of beebread -they are finding this in many unhealthy hives but they have feed entombed pollen to lab bees and they say no evidence that this is the problem -dennis vanengelsdrop has done work on this and you can google for more info
    to me it seams that the bees could just remove it -but they dont RDY-B

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Concord, CA
    Posts
    4,121

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    I've noticed a red flowering eucalyptus blooming here.
    Are some varieties of eucalyptus poisonous too bees?
    Dan

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,307

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    dave:

    As to the symptoms, I'll keep my ete for the legs. Swollen abdomens for sure. You might want to check their digestive systems. Another symptom is undigested pollen along with diarrhea or watery looking feces. When you pull out the stinger and look at the digestive system you'll see undigested pollen grains.

    Jean-Marc

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Fresno California USA
    Posts
    2,479

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    Dave thanks for the ramp test descriptions and the comment on Vitamin C, I have never done that but sure will now.

    Having trouble accessing bee-l.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,849

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    Ramp test??? who has three frames left to shake out???

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Glencoe, Okla USA
    Posts
    300

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    I watched the film "Silence of the Bees" again, it mentioned that African Killer Bees are not bothered by Colony Collapse Disorder or "CCD" (at the time the film was made). The film also said that CCD is a virus and the tests when the film was made indicated it was "Israel Acute Paralysis Virus," the date the film was made is 2007 is it still thought that CCD is Israel Acute Paralysis Virus?
    Are there any treatments that work?

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Lindsay Ontario
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    odfrank I thought you said you had 20 hives
    If these 2 are your only hives my sympathy

    >Are there any treatments that work?
    Without BIG bucks there are few.
    large doses of C is unpleasant for virus,
    but short-lived. Cheap tho
    NOT a cure, a treatment
    Could you "vacinate" a Queen
    I somehow don't think so
    Breed survivors, but it's a big jump in genome
    so a treatment is usefull so that you have some
    left to breed from rather than little choice
    (ie the 80% die-off senario)

    > When you pull out the stinger
    If you do this and get a drop of feaces on your finger, smell it
    If it is VERY stinky this is another symptom -- from the damaged guts

    dave

  8. #28

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    Quote Originally Posted by Myron Denny View Post
    is it still thought that CCD is Israel Acute Paralysis Virus?
    In the early samples of CCD colonies IAPV was found in a high percentage...approaching 100%. On the other hand they found many perfectly healthy colonies with IAPV. Last I heard, IAPV was not considered the single agent cause of CCD. I once heard Kim Flottum refer to CCD as 'death by a thousand cuts'. I think that is likely closer to the truth.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Canada BC Delta
    Posts
    421

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    My understanding of viruses is that they are not anything new. There is belief that viruses play a key roll in how living things evolve and adapt to their/its environment. Some of these new viruses can be very destructive to the host until it builds up some sort of immunity.
    Concerning the bee I'm not sure if the viruses we know are new other than putting a name to them. There have been around 20 of them found in the honeybee so far and I'm sure more will be discovered. Some of the ones that can be seen have been named others haven't.
    If these viruses have been around longer than thought with the bees showing very little ill effect in the past, I would think we should be looking for what has changed that's allowing them to run out of control.
    I like the feeding vitamin c ideal. I know our own biology uses vitamin c to make interferon which helps control viruses but have no idea if this is the same in the honeybee.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Lindsay Ontario
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    > Kim Flottum refer to CCD as 'death by a thousand cuts'. I think that is likely closer to the truth.
    I disagree, In my case I am quite sure that it is solely viral
    Of course the bees can also be infected with nosema, have pesticide exposure, and
    have poor pollen forage. This probably "muddies" the symptoms
    None of this applies to my bees

    > uses vitamin c to make interferon which helps control viruses but have no idea if this is the same in the honeybee
    Likely not, probably differential toxicity
    That is: C has low/very low toxicity for man or bees
    but C has medium toxicity for virus
    ergo LARGE doses

    dave
    Last edited by dthompson; 12-28-2009 at 04:35 PM. Reason: dylexia

  11. #31

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    Quote Originally Posted by dthompson View Post
    I disagree, In my case I am quite sure that it is solely viral
    And Dave Hackenberg is equally certain it is systemic pesticides. Many other beekeepers who've had CCD like symptoms have their own pet causes.
    I am curious...where did you get the name viral CCD?
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Glencoe, Okla USA
    Posts
    300

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    I checked with the ARS website in Baton Rouge to see if they had anything new, it looks to me they do. The website address is:
    http://www.ars.usda.gov/News/docs.htm?docid=15572

  13. #33
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,849

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    >And Dave Hackenberg is equally certain it is systemic pesticides

    I have a hard time blaming systemic pesticides in my suburban setting. Yes, there are arborists applying Merit, and home owners applying Bayer Total Control, but it is all widespread and to the spot, not blanket treatment as in an agricultural setting. And why are only half the hives hit hard, with normal hives right next to dying ones? And why so bad in cold and rainy weather?

    My guess is VIRAL.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Glencoe, Okla USA
    Posts
    300

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    Pathogen Loads Higher in Bee Colonies Suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder
    By Kim Kaplan
    August 12 , 2009
    A higher total load of pathogens—viruses, bacteria and fungi—appears to have the strongest link with Colony Collapse Disorder found so far, according to a new study published by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and university scientists.

    The study was headed by Pennsylvania State University entomologist Dennis vanEngelsdorp and entomologist Jeff Pettis, geneticist Jay Evans and virologist Yanping Chen with the ARS Bee Research Laboratory in Beltsville, Md. They looked at more than 200 individual variables in 91 colonies from 13 apiaries in Florida and California, where many beekeepers overwinter their honey bees. Among the factors for which the researchers screened were bacteria, mites, Nosema (protozoan parasites), numerous viruses, nutrition status and 171 pesticides. Adult bees, wax comb, beebread (stored and processed pollen), and brood were all sampled.

    No single variable was found consistently in only those honey bee colonies that had Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD)—a syndrome characterized by the sudden disappearance of adult honey bees in a colony—that has been devastating some beekeepers in the United States and other countries.

    Among the colonies that had CCD, no single pathogen among those screened had a higher prevalence. Nor was there a higher or lower prevalence of varroa mites, tracheal mites or spores from Nosema species, nor a higher total load of these parasites and pathogens. Nosema has been implicated in colony die-offs in Spain, but it has not been closely associated with CCD in the United States.

    But overall, CCD colonies were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens—bacteria, microparasites like Nosema, and viruses. Overall, 55 percent of CCD colonies were infected with three or more viruses, compared to 28 percent of non-CCD colonies. The researchers also found detectable levels of residues from 50 different pesticides in all of the sampled colonies. There was no association between increased pesticide levels and CCD.

    In fact, the pyrethroid insecticide Esfenvalerate, used for a wide variety of pests such as moths, flies, beetles and other insects on vegetable, fruit and nut crops, was more prevalent in the wax in non-CCD colonies. This insecticide was found in 32 percent of non-CCD colonies, compared with 5 percent of the CCD colonies.

    Coumaphos, which is used to treat varroa mites in honey bees, was also found in higher levels in non-CCD colonies.

    As for pathogen levels, what the study cannot show is whether the higher pathogen load was involved in the cause of CCD or was a result of CCD, according to vanEngelsdorp. Higher pathogen loads are likely to have caused CCD symptoms, but what causes the bees to become infected with so many pathogens is still not known, he added.

    While the study’s results don’t indicate a specific cause of CCD, the results do help scientists narrow the direction of future CCD research by showing that some possible causes are less likely, added Pettis.

    ARS is the principal intramural scientific research agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

    The scientific article can be found at http://www.plosone.org/article/info:...F39D61A272CDAF.

    A report that summarizes research progress on CCD can be found at http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/br/ccd/cc...ressreport.pdf.



    [Top]

    Last Modified: 08/12/2009

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Canada BC Delta
    Posts
    421

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    The number of managed honey bee colonies has dropped from 5 million in the1940s to only 2.5 million today. At the same time, the call for hives to supply pollination service has continued to climb. This means honey bee colonies are trucked farther and more often than ever before.
    http://www.ars.usda.gov/News/docs.htm?docid=15572

    Seems like the honeybee has been on a steady decline for a while.

    Some interesting info on vitamin c supplementation.

    EFFECT OF DIETARY VITAMIN C LEVELS
    ON THE RATE OF BROOD PRODUCTION
    OF FREE-FLYING AND CONFINED COLONIES
    OF HONEY BEES

    In the study using caged bees, significantly more brood was reared by bees
    fed either the diet supplemented with 500 pg/g or the control than by bees offered diets containing
    either 1 000 or 2 000 pg/g L-ascorbic acid. This study also demonstrated for the first time that
    bees are able to produce this vitamin since prepupae from colonies fed the diets without vitamin C
    had equivalent levels of ascorbic acid to those fed the enriched diets.
    http://www.apidologie.org/articles/a..._4_ART0003.pdf

    It would be great if we had this kind of information for North America and probably something we should look at closely for our bees. Also an interesting read.

    NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF HONEY BEES

    http://www.honeybee.com.au/Library/p...nutrition.html

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Lindsay Ontario
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    >with normal hives right next to dying ones
    Just give it a few months, < then 1 year

    The vanEngelsdorp,Pettis, Evans, Chen study did
    show that a large risk factor was to be "close" to a ccd hive
    That is: In a yard with ccd the living hives had a 3x chance
    of "getting" ccd compared to a yard without ccd
    The chance was worse for hives side by side
    Their study exonerated pesticides as far as I can see

    Watch the rear legs

    dave

  17. #37

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    odfrank and dthompson, I am not disputing that you guys have some sick bees.

    Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD)—a syndrome characterized by the sudden disappearance of adult honey bees in a colony
    Add to that that there is not any evidence in the immediate area of the hive of dead and dying bees. They just leave and never return. odfrank posted photos of dead bees all around his hives. And he had two that were total absconds.

    Whether or not you have a viral, bacterial, nutrition or parasite problem....it doesn't sound like classic CCD. Have you guys sent off samples to your respective agricultural testing agencies?
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Glencoe, Okla USA
    Posts
    300

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    Will someone with a lot more computer than I have read and condence the following into a brief paragraph or two. http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/br/ccd/cc...ressreport.pdf.

    I have it downloaded but cannot read it???
    Myron Denny

  19. #39
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,849

    Default Exciting new video added to this thread


  20. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    3,590

    Default Re: Today's Dead outs - CCD?

    Quote Originally Posted by Myron Denny View Post
    Will someone with a lot more computer than I have read and condence the following into a brief paragraph or two. http://www.ars.usda.gov/is/br/ccd/cc...ressreport.pdf.

    I have it downloaded but cannot read it???
    Myron Denny
    Myron,

    Go here http://get.adobe.com/reader/ and download the "Adobe Reader"




    Joe
    Last edited by BeeCurious; 12-29-2009 at 11:46 AM. Reason: bad link
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads