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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: Capturing Feral Bees

    Cleared the brush away from the front of this feral hive yesterday. They're still fairly active and moving around pretty good during the warm part of the day.

    I also bought one of those white, baggy paint suits to help protect me from the girls when I'm disturbing them.

    I'll be going over to clear the top and back of the fallen log here in the next couple of days and will also saw off the limbs of the log and the length that is not inhabited by the bees to make it all easier and more comfortable for me when I'm working with them.

    Still need to build a hive for them but that will only take a day and I may have time to start that tonight.

    Keep watching! Hilarious video coming soon.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    141

    Default Re: Capturing Feral Bees

    Looking forward to the video

    Mick

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Hampton, VA, USA
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: Capturing Feral Bees

    Cactii,

    Sorry for getting into this late. I move bees and remove bees all the time. When you get ready to move them the first step is to close up the log. go over to the log at night and put some screen over the hole, Use staples to hold the screen in place and then tape the edges if you can. the object is to keep the bees inside so you can work the following day. The next day you can move the log to your yard for work later. If you have to cut the log to length so you can move it just be sure to have smoke and screen to close off the ends where you cut. When you get the log to your yard ensure you put the log in the same orientation on the ground and leave them closed up for an extra day.

    To get the bees out of the log you can cut them out of trap them out. Most times in this situation I would build a hive on top of the log and put hole in the bottom above the hole in the log so that when the bees leave the log they have to go into the hive box. It will take a few weeks to get them into the hive but they will move, even the queen.

    good luck.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Lincolnton, NC
    Posts
    1,106

    Default Re: Capturing Feral Bees

    I did one once almost exactly the way Hampton described and it worked great. I took about a month for them to all move up.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    O'Fallon, MO
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Capturing Feral Bees

    Looking forward to the video here as well

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Honduras
    Posts
    228

    Default Re: Capturing Feral Bees

    My wife and I happened to have just done a colony removal from a tree trunk at the beginning of this week. The tree was cut down because it was right in the way of where a fence was being built around a coffee-drying patio. The tree was cut down without a problem but the bees got riled up once the guy in charge of this started to cut the trunk up in pieces. That’s when he came looking for me.

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1101.jpg

    I decided to do the cutout right there. I was thinking about moving the piece of log with the bee to one of my bee yards but it would have been a bit difficult. The wood was still green, the trunk was fairly big and a vehicle doesn’t have access right up to the yard itself. It would have been heavy and a lot of work to move it.

    We started by cutting into the bottom of the log to see exactly where the hollow began and where the combs were located. We then cut off a section of the log to open up part of the hive. The guy was careful and tried not to cut the combs with the chainsaw (did a good job). These exposed combs were then cut out. The best ones were tied into frames.

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1104.jpg

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1106.jpg

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1107.jpg

    We just kept cutting the log to open it up section by section—removing combs, tying them into frames, and looking for the queen as we went along.

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1113.jpg

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1117.jpg

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1118.jpg

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1122.jpg

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1123.jpg

    I shook and scooped as many bees as I could into my box, but I never did actually find the queen. We left the box on top of the opened-up log during the night, hoping all the stragglers would move in. The entrance to the box was actually down inside the log, close to where the original entrance on the log is.

    However, when I went back the next morning, there was a pretty big group of bees still inside the log that hadn’t moved into the box. I put a piece of flexible aluminum plating underneath them and gently brushed the majority onto it. I then dumped them into the box. The queen must have been there because the rest started to immediately go into the box. Once the majority was in the box, we sealed up the entrance and took it to the apiary.

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1128.jpg

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1131.jpg

    http://i155.photobucket.com/albums/s...e10Ene1132.jpg

    These were Africanized bees but they stayed fairly calm. There weren’t a real lot of bees which helped things. The first combs we removed had a number of recently opened queen cells so my guess is that they had swarmed within the last week or two. There were eggs but no larva or sealed brood.

    Do you have to worry about Africanized bees in northern Mexico? Take this into consideration and take precautions. I did this cutout in the late afternoon because I knew they would be Africanized. If they happened to get ornery, they would stay riled up for only a couple hours (until night) instead of all day. An Africanized hive is usually settled down by the next morning.

    Cactii, as far as your comment in your initial post about lacking equipment, if you need to jury rig a suit, look for something at Goodwill or a used clothing store. A big pair of white or tan colored pants and a long-sleeved shirt can work and it can be fairly inexpensive. I would wear this over your normal clothes. You can also make inexpensive gloves by having a sleeve sewed onto normal leather gloves or canvas garden gloves. My wife made me some extra veils out of mosquito netting (seen in the photos).

    Good luck.

    ---------
    Tom

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    1,398

    Default Re: Capturing Feral Bees

    Thomas, that's one huge smoker you have there. Must have been made in Texas!
    De Colores,
    Ken

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Honduras
    Posts
    228

    Default Re: Capturing Feral Bees

    You don´t want to be caught short on smoke when dealing with Africanized bees!

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico
    Posts
    147

    Default Re: Capturing Feral Bees

    This one goes out to you USCBeeMan!

    Here's my first two videos of Moving the Feral Honeybee Hive. Mostly just preparations but there were some surprises - things are not always as they seem.

    http://www.beinggreenonline.com/cont...anageable-hive

    Enjoy!
    Alive Since 1973

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Murfreesboro, TN, USA
    Posts
    1,398

    Default Re: Capturing Feral Bees

    Enjoyed viewing. My experience has been that nothing can be taken for granted. The girls do things their way and has no "human logic". Would have been better if you had brought a tarp to cover them hive. Not only because of they temperature but because of robbing. Hope they will be okay.

    You mentioned the queen in the second video. I thought I saw her before you mentioned seeing her. Look at 2:26 which was about the time you got the camera focused. Looked like a bee with a long golden abdomen.

    Good luck.
    De Colores,
    Ken

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