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  1. #1
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    Default Comparison: sucrose or high fructose corn syrup.

    "Honey bee colony feeding trials were conducted to determine whether differential effects of carbohydrate feeding (sucrose syrup (SS) vs. high fructose corn syrup, or HFCS) could be measured between colonies fed exclusively on these syrups. In one experiment, there was a significant difference in mean wax production between the treatment groups and a significant interaction between time and treatment for the colonies confined in a flight arena. On average, the colonies supplied with SS built 7916.7 cm(2) 1015.25 cm(2) honeycomb, while the colonies supplied with HFCS built 4571.63 cm(2) 786.45 cm(2). The mean mass of bees supplied with HFCS was 4.65 kg ( 0.97 kg), while those supplied with sucrose had a mean of 8.27 kg ( 1.26). There was no significant difference between treatment groups in terms of brood rearing. Differences in brood production were complicated due to possible nutritional deficiencies experienced by both treatment groups. In the second experiment, colonies supplemented with SS through the winter months at a remote field site exhibited increased spring brood production when compared to colonies fed with HFCS. The differences in adult bee populations were significant, having an overall average of 10.0 1.3 frames of bees fed the sucrose syrup between November 2008 and April 2009, compared to 7.5 1.6 frames of bees fed exclusively on HFCS. For commercial queen beekeepers, feeding the right supplementary carbohydrates could be especially important, given the findings of this study." in Comparison of productivity of colonies of honey bees, Apis mellifera, supplemented with sucrose or high fructose corn syrup. Sammataro D., Weiss M.; J Insect Sci. 2013;13:19.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
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    Default Re: Comparison: sucrose or high fructose corn syrup.

    Eduardo, that seems to indicate a very significant advantage of sugar syrup over high fructose corn syrup. I wonder how many hives were involved in the study and what controls were in place to eliminate the influence of other possible factors beside food source. If the difference is that well defined I am surprised that it is not common knowledge. What is your estimation of the quality and accuracy of the experiment methodology?
    Frank

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Comparison: sucrose or high fructose corn syrup.

    Quote Originally Posted by crofter View Post
    What is your estimation of the quality and accuracy of the experiment methodology?
    Hi Frank
    I found the link to the paper: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3735052/
    The results show statistically significant differences in many of the aspects evaluated , in order to make more efficient the SS.

    There are several experimental designs used as a function of the nature of the study and its objectives , all of well defined and accepted by the scientific community. The most used in our field are : ( 1 ) controlled and ( 2 ) comparative . In this case the researchers chose a comparative study without a control group.

    As a rule the experimental designs and statistical treatment of these studies published in prestigious journals are very solid . For editing are reviewed by an independent group of researchers pairs, which carefully analyze these and other aspects.

    A summary vision about research design: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Research_design

  4. #4
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    Dec 2014
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    Calhoun, MICHIGAN, USA
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    Default Re: Comparison: sucrose or high fructose corn syrup.

    Quote Originally Posted by Eduardo Gomes View Post
    Hi Frank
    I found the link to the paper: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3735052/
    The results show statistically significant differences in many of the aspects evaluated , in order to make more efficient the SS.

    There are several experimental designs used as a function of the nature of the study and its objectives , all of well defined and accepted by the scientific community. The most used in our field are : ( 1 ) controlled and ( 2 ) comparative . In this case the researchers chose a comparative study without a control group.

    As a rule the experimental designs and statistical treatment of these studies published in prestigious journals are very solid . For editing are reviewed by an independent group of researchers pairs, which carefully analyze these and other aspects.

    We have purchased in Michigan, Liquid Sucrose From Sugar Beets from Michigan Sugar Company now for five

    years. we use a 275 Gallon Tote. 3000 plus pounds of sugar. about $800 dollars Agricultural price.

    When the sugar liquid is still warm we add lemon grass oil and spearmint oil mixed like honeybee healthy

    One gallon of essential oil treats 275 gallons of Warm Liquid Sucrose.

    we open feed and use two gallon pail feeders. They work great.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michigan_Sugar

    Some times we add Super DFM Honeybee to the Sugar water before feeding the bees.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JUnCV9sd67c

  5. #5
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    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
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    Default Re: Comparison: sucrose or high fructose corn syrup.

    Eduardo, I glanced over the study and one thing I wonder about is if tests were done on the particular batch of HFCS used in the tests. In the discussions someone mentioned this information.

    Hydroxymethylfurfural?

    " When HFCS is stored for a long time, especially where the syrup can be easily overheated, HMF will form (LeBlanc et al. 2009). The presence of HMF is known to cause dark coloring to honey, and is toxic to honey bees (Kim et al. 1995; LeBlanc et al. 2009). If HFCS is going to be used by commercial bee operations, it must be stored in a temperature-controlled facility and not mixed with old, unused syrup or with water. Currently, many commercial operations are now mixing HFCS with sucrose to prevent the formation of HMF and mitigate the effects of HFCS alone."

    Sometimes some such factor can skew the results badly.
    Frank

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Comparison: sucrose or high fructose corn syrup.

    Yes the paper also speaks of this problem, linking it to storage conditions.
    "Reports of bees not feeding or dying after being fed were mentioned by some beekeepers (Oliver 2007). HFCS can cause other problems, such as the formation of toxins as a result of heat, the chemical properties of fructose, and the low pH of HFCS (Kim et al. 1995; LeBlanc et al. 2009). These conditions can promote the hydration product and known bee toxin, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), which readily forms during high heat storage conditions. Samples of bee feed from various commercial beekeeping operations, where the syrup was stored in outside tanks, have confirmed this hypothesis (Weiss 2009; Ruiz-Matute et al. 2010)."

    The researchers were careful to assess the HMF of the HFCS that used on their experience:
    "All colonies were fitted with top feeders and randomly assigned a treatment of either commercial bee feed HFCS or SS. Corn Sweet HFCS55 was used as the HFCS feed (no HMF formation was found), and sucrose mixed first with hot tap water (hot enough to dissolve the sugar crystals) then cooled, was the SS feed."

    I get the impression that researchers were very careful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Algoma dr. Ontario, Canada
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    Default Re: Comparison: sucrose or high fructose corn syrup.

    "(no HMF formation was found)," Sorry I missed that! I will go stand in the corner.
    Frank

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