Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 37
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Gloucester County, NJ
    Posts
    577

    Default Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    I was thinking about making a heating ring like in the picture. I can use my our side wood Boiler as a heat source. Just dropped the ring in and in a day or so I would think the barrel would be uncrystallized. What's your thoughts?
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,219

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    There are a few beekeepers in this area that have similar coils of stainless tubing. Works well.
    Adam - Zone 5A
    www.adamshoney.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    5,715

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Quote Originally Posted by adamant View Post
    I was thinking about making a heating ring like in the picture. I can use my our side wood Boiler as a heat source. Just dropped the ring in and in a day or so I would think the barrel would be uncrystallized. What's your thoughts?
    This would work only if the honey is soft enough so you can push this to the bottom which is where your heat source should be. I store the drums I wish to bottle in a warm place, then when I'm ready to bottle them I use a band heater placed at the very bottom of the drum but you must stir them quite regularly to get a nice warmup without scalding any honey.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,219

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    If you set it on top of a barrel of solid honey, it will actually melt down through under the weight of the tubing and the hot water in it.

    I use Swienty melter (http://www.swienty.com/shop/vare.asp...&vareid=109653) that works in the same way. Set it on top and it gently melts down through under it's own weight.
    Adam - Zone 5A
    www.adamshoney.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    5,715

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Quote Originally Posted by zhiv9 View Post
    If you set it on top of a barrel of solid honey, it will actually melt down through under the weight of the tubing and the hot water in it.

    I use Swienty melter (http://www.swienty.com/shop/vare.asp...&vareid=109653) that works in the same way. Set it on top and it gently melts down through under it's own weight.
    I guess I would have to see that in action to be convinced there wouldn't be localized scalding of honey. Certainly if you begin with honey at a reasonably soft consistency it would work but a lot would depend upon the type of honey, it's moisture level as well as its temperature.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,219

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Quote Originally Posted by jim lyon View Post
    I guess I would have to see that in action to be convinced there wouldn't be localized scalding of honey. Certainly if you begin with honey at a reasonably soft consistency it would work but a lot would depend upon the type of honey, it's moisture level as well as its temperature.
    The scalding is prevented by limiting the temperature of the water in the hot water coil and in the case of the Swienty, there is a thermocouple right where it is melting the honey. You would have a much better chance of scalding with band heaters if you don't have a thermocouple right near the band to control them with temperature.
    Adam - Zone 5A
    www.adamshoney.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    5,715

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Quote Originally Posted by zhiv9 View Post
    The scalding is prevented by limiting the temperature of the water in the hot water coil and in the case of the Swienty, there is a thermocouple right where it is melting the honey. You would have a much better chance of scalding with band heaters if you don't have a thermocouple right near the band to control them with temperature.
    The OP was talking about using a boiler which, to me, implies steam. Yes, hot water would work well. You're quite right Adam, band heaters must be used with care. If the drum is granulated hard it must be used at a very low setting for the better part of a day before there is enough liquid honey to allow you to increase the setting and begin stirring. We have a converted milk agitator which we lower into the honey when turning on our band heater. That setup does a great job as long as the honey is in at least a semi-liquid state. We can raise the temp of a barrel of honey from room temp up to around 130 f in around 4 hours without any scalding issues at all.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,219

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Quote Originally Posted by jim lyon View Post
    The OP was talking about using a boiler which, to me, implies steam.
    That makes sense now - I missed the boiler and was thinking hot water. The beekeepers that I know that use a coil like this already have the water set in the 110F range to heat jacketed tanks, re-purposed milk tanks, etc. Steam would be too hot.
    Adam - Zone 5A
    www.adamshoney.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Annapolis Valley, N.S. Canada
    Posts
    292

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    I just bought one of those Brisk Heat band heaters, and everyone I'm asking is telling me to start out with the band at the top, and then slowly work it down every couple of hours.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    8,509

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Outdoor "wood boilers" don't actually boil water. They are not pressurized (there is an air vent in the "boiler" to ensure that) and under normal operation should never be producing steam. However, they certainly are capable of producing very "hot" water. Here is what one manufacturer says ...
    Why is it called an Outdoor Wood Boiler (Wood furnace) ?

    The name is a little misleading as it does not actually boiler water, it heats it to a safe 150-185 degrees. Water actually boils near 212 degrees. Our wood boilers allows the user to adjust the temperature of the water to your preferred level. For instance, during the summer, we recommend you leave the temperature at 153 degrees and during the winter we recommend you adjust the temperature up to 185 degrees.

    http://www.woodboiler.us/index.php/faq/
    I would be concerned that 185 degrees is a bit much for heating honey. If one had hot water in this range, I would install a tempering valve for the honey heater coil.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    5,715

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Quote Originally Posted by PerryBee View Post
    I just bought one of those Brisk Heat band heaters, and everyone I'm asking is telling me to start out with the band at the top, and then slowly work it down every couple of hours.
    Welllll, yes, if you are trying to liquefy a drum of hard granulated honey that's probably a strategy you could use but I sure wouldn't leave it up high for very long. It's a given that hot honey is less dense than cold honey. If you put the band at the top the heated honey will, for the most part, stay right on top. If you place it on the bottom the heated honey will rise away from the heater and be replaced by cooler denser honey.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Wetaskiwin, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    40

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    This Bee Blanket product just launched recently. I have no experience with it or the company or even a reason why it's different than any of the other band heaters on the market.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,219

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Quote Originally Posted by pleasantvalley View Post
    This Bee Blanket product just launched recently. I have no experience with it or the company or even a reason why it's different than any of the other band heaters on the market.
    I looked pretty seriously at a blanket heater when I bought the Swienty immersion heater. This unit is priced more competitively than Power Blanket's other units, but doesn't have the digital adjustment/control. Blanket heaters spread the heat out over the drum instead of concentrating the heat like a band heater. With digital temperature control, the risk of scorched honey is very low. You can use them on poly drums as well.
    Adam - Zone 5A
    www.adamshoney.com

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    910

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Jim

    I guess I just assumed that a large scale honey producer such as yourself would have a "heat room" to run barrels and buckets in to liquefy honey. But you use band heaters? Hmmmm
    "Tradition becomes our security, and when the mind is secure it is in decay".....Krishnamurti

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    5,715

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Riskybizz View Post
    Jim

    I guess I just assumed that a large scale honey producer such as yourself would have a "heat room" to run barrels and buckets in to liquefy honey. But you use band heaters? Hmmmm
    Ha, ha. Actually I pack less than 10 drums a year, mostly for land owners and a few locals. I got out of the retail honey marketing business a looooong time ago and don't miss it all.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    3,364

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Being a commercial beekeeper AND honey packer can be quite the challenge. The skill sets are way different.

    All of the above methods are adequate for liquefying a few barrels of honey. If you wish to do 20 drums a day, much different equipment is needed.

    Crazy Roland

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Nevada City, CA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    I'm in same situation, have drum of granulated honey in a garag, which I can heat up to 80 or so. I have the 1200 W brisk-heat band heater. I've had it on a pretty low heat for 24 hours with almost no affect.
    Have you noticed that this thing 'cycles' on and off over about 60 seconds. At this low setting it goes from about 100 deg F to 145 deg F. I.e. it is either full on or off, and it just cycles to keep an average temperature.
    What temperatures do you think are needed to liquify the honey without scorching?
    Thanks,
    Brion

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Menomonee Falls, Wis.
    Posts
    3,364

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    That question does not have an easy answer. Six months at 98.6 deg F. might do more damage than thirty seconds at 150 deg F.
    It is the area under the curve that does the damage.


    Generally, a band heater on a drum is not a delicate method, it takes too long for the heat to get from the outside of the drum to the center. This burns the outside before the center is liquid.

    The best solution is to remove the honey as it becomes liquid, to prevent further warming and damage.

    Crazy Roland

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Nevada City, CA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Roland View Post
    That question does not have an easy answer. Six months at 98.6 deg F. might do more damage than thirty seconds at 150 deg F.
    It is the area under the curve that does the damage.
    Generally, a band heater on a drum is not a delicate method, it takes too long for the heat to get from the outside of the drum to the center. This burns the outside before the center is liquid.
    The best solution is to remove the honey as it becomes liquid, to prevent further warming and damage.
    Crazy Roland
    I appreciate the info very much Roland. I'm realizing that granulated honey in a drum is a real pain! So maybe pump the liquid as soon as possible (even though it might still be a bit 'lumpy') into another drum. I have a bottling tank with water jacket, maybe that is the best way to finish 'de-granulating'?
    Brion

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Annapolis Valley, N.S. Canada
    Posts
    292

    Default Re: Post your pic on how you heat your drum of honey!

    I just went through this yesterday. I had a drum about 1/3 full and decided to try my new brisk band heater on it and then pump it into my bottling tank. I started off real low with the temp settings as I never trust them to start off. I kept an eye on the temps using a candy thermometer and when it hit 110F I started mixing it with a paddle every hour or so. When I thought I had it warm enough I tried pumping it out and the first half did so nicely, but then the pumping slowed down. I realized that I didn't mix it well or long enough as the pump was picking up lots of granulated stuff at the bottom. It was a good learning situation on 1/3 of a barrel and I will use the info when I start on the full ones. Once it's in the bottling tank it can be heated to complete the process. I strained my honey before it even went into the barrels.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads