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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lawrenceburg, IN
    Posts
    98

    Default Powdered Sugar Dusting?

    Has anyone had success with doing a Powdered Sugar Dusting this late in the Season? I was thinking i might give the girls a good dusting before it gets much colder around here. Right now we have 50's & 60's for the day and low 40's at night, would that matter?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Greene,Ohio,USA
    Posts
    8

    Default Re: Powdered Sugar Dusting?

    I have done a "sugaring" just last week here in Dayton area Ohio, on a day when the temp was up in the late afternoon. Was on a hive that I was concerned about as I could see lots of damaged new bees. This was after a check of them about a week previously, and about two weeks before that one when I had dusted then also. Each time I have noticed a new batch emerging I have gone in and done it. The previous times I'd had big drop off from it. Then last week when I did the 24 hour check it was very minimal. I figured I'd give it another shot while I had the chance as long as the temp was above 55. Won't really know the true extent for a while I think. Best of luck to you.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Brown County, IN
    Posts
    2,034

    Default Re: Powdered Sugar Dusting?

    Temps aren't an issue as much as timing. You won't hurt the bees by treating with powdered sugar this late in the year, but you may be late as far as optimal effect. Ideally, you want have strong bees going into winter, so you knock down mites in late summer/early fall - that way you'll have strong, new bees heading into winter. By waiting this late, you'll knock off mites, but the bees you have now are basically the ones you'll overwinter.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,838

    Default Re: Powdered Sugar Dusting?

    Temps aren't too important, EXCEPT don't powder 'em when they are clustered!

    Timing is very critical for preparing bees for winter. Now is too late to "prepare".

    If you "had" a good mite-kill about mid August/Sept and your bees are now health, but a few mites remain or a few have re-infested your colony (due to robbing, etc.), reducing your mite load now will reduce the amount of mites you start w/ NEXT year, which will be a good thing (is that sentance too long? ).

    Now is "good timing" for "cleaning up" mites.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Sebastopol, Ca.
    Posts
    307

    Default Re: Powdered Sugar Dusting?

    Here in California the mite load follows the brood load, so the mites start building up in March and by Mid June they are at their peak, as is the brood. So treating them follows, about every three weeks due to their gestation period. From what I gather all hives now have mites, but the healthy hives simply deal with it, with our help.
    Friend told me a real good way to see if the bees are optimally sanitary.
    Poke a few holes in about 10 brood and leave them. Come back in 24 hours and pull that frame. If the bees are practicing good hygiene, then those cells will have been cleaned out. If that is the case, then one can trust the mites are being cleaned out too.
    Cheap and cool!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Canterbry, UK
    Posts
    1,369

    Default Re: Powdered Sugar Dusting?

    Quote Originally Posted by LenInNorCal View Post
    Here in California the mite load follows the brood load, so the mites start building up in March and by Mid June they are at their peak, as is the brood. So treating them follows, about every three weeks due to their gestation period. From what I gather all hives now have mites, but the healthy hives simply deal with it, with our help.
    Friend told me a real good way to see if the bees are optimally sanitary.
    Poke a few holes in about 10 brood and leave them. Come back in 24 hours and pull that frame. If the bees are practicing good hygiene, then those cells will have been cleaned out. If that is the case, then one can trust the mites are being cleaned out too.
    Cheap and cool!
    The important thing now is to allow the adapted strains to replace the unadpted, as would happen by natural selection in the wild. Then your whole apiary will be mite-resistant. The best way to do this is by splitting your best hives and squeezing out the queens in the worst. The worst possible thing is to treat weak bees - you just preserve unwanted genes and spread them around like poison.

    Mike

    Mike
    Anti-husbandry: Medication + Reproduction = Continuing Sickness
    http://www.suttonjoinery.co.uk/CCD/

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