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  1. #1
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    Default Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    I had someone tell me they had never heard of an equinotical storm (also spelled equinotial). Then I did a search and found very little reference to this term. Does anyone but me know what an equinotical storm is?

    And do you have any modern day references to this information? I have some old Agricultural books that reference these storms, but can not find anything current.
    "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." Nathan Hale, 1776

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    From World Book Encyclopedia, Vol. 6 (1970), page 268, under definition of "equinox".

    "The sun crosses the equator twice a year, and so there are two equinoxes. The spring, or vernal, equinox occurs around March 21, as the sun moves north. The autumn, or autumnal, equinox comes around September 23, as the sun moves south.

    Storms that arise during an equinox are sometimes call equinotial gales, for a very good reason. At this time, the sun travels north or south faster than at any time other time of year. In a week, it moves over 2 1/2 degrees. This change in the sun's position produces such variations in the pattern of warm and cold air masses that violent storms are often caused.
    "
    "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." Nathan Hale, 1776

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    I think it is a term that has died out.

    "Equinoctial Gales"; storms which are observed

    EQUINOCTIAL STORMS. 7

    generally to take place about the time of the
    Sun's crossing the equator or equinoctial line,
    at which time there is equal day and night
    throughout the world.
    The old sailors and fisherman would be told (warned) to wait until the Autumn Equinox had passes before starting their voyage. With the use of satellites and communication systems. Fisherman and such can can begin their journey anytime they want and not have to worry about the Equintial Storms (as much). Now the terms they use are, Low Pressure, Depression, Nino, ect.. for forecasting future patterns.

    http://www.archive.org/stream/arethe...rrich_djvu.txt

    http://usasearch.gov/search?v%3aproj...4&action=list&
    Chuck Norris has a grizzly bear carpet in his room. The bear isn't dead it is just afraid to move.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    Quote Originally Posted by DRUR View Post
    From World Book Encyclopedia, Vol. 6 (1970), page 268, under definition of "equinox".

    "The sun crosses the equator twice a year, and so there are two equinoxes. The spring, or vernal, equinox occurs around March 21, as the sun moves north. The autumn, or autumnal, equinox comes around September 23, as the sun moves south.

    Storms that arise during an equinox are sometimes call equinotial gales, for a very good reason. At this time, the sun travels north or south faster than at any time other time of year. In a week, it moves over 2 1/2 degrees. This change in the sun's position produces such variations in the pattern of warm and cold air masses that violent storms are often caused.
    "

    Wait a second, here... did I get this all wrong? Isn't it the Earth that moves, while the sun just hangs there?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    picky, picky, picky.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    Quote Originally Posted by walking bird View Post
    Wait a second, here... did I get this all wrong? Isn't it the Earth that moves, while the sun just hangs there?
    It's a matter of perspective isn't it. From where I am standing it's the sun which is moving, but from a scientific perspective aren't they actually both moving?
    "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." Nathan Hale, 1776

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    C'mon, Danny, isn't that what THE EARTH IS FLAT view is?

    That's why we call it a Solar System instead of a Skating Rink.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    Phew! Thanks, Tom. I knew there was something about Earth rotating on an axis and following a slightly elliptical orbit around the sun that I remembered from one of those random classes I attended... randomly.

    Speaking of things celestial, if you happen to be up and about at around 3AM PST Wed morning, take a peek at the meteor shower that should be visible as we (the moving Earth, that is) pass through debris from Halley's comet. Supposed to be up to 60 "shooting stars" an hour.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    C'mon, Danny, isn't that what THE EARTH IS FLAT view is?
    Absolutely not. Its a matter of perspective. Do you really believe the sun isn't moving?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom G. Laury View Post
    That's why we call it a Solar System instead of a Skating Rink.
    Yes, but our solar system is only one of many which comprise a much larger orbit within the Milky Way.

    Quote Originally Posted by walking bird View Post
    Phew! Thanks, Tom. I knew there was something about Earth rotating on an axis and following a slightly elliptical orbit around the sun that I remembered from one of those random classes I attended... randomly.
    Let me see, doesn't the moon orbit around the earth? Yes. So is the earth stationary? No.

    Doesn't the earth orbit the sun? Yes. So is the sun stationary? No.

    Doesn't the sun orbit within the Milky Way? Yes. So is the sun staionary? No.

    Let's examine my original answer:

    Quote Originally Posted by DRUR View Post
    It's a matter of perspective isn't it. From where I am standing it's the sun which is moving, but from a scientific perspective aren't they actually both moving?
    For more information go here: http://www.universetoday.com/guide-t...sun/sun-orbit/
    "Everything's orbiting something it seems. The Moon goes around the Earth, and the Earth orbits the Sun. But did you know that the Sun orbits the Milky Way galaxy?
    Astronomers have calculated that it takes the Sun 226 million years to completely orbit around the center of the Milky Way. In other words, that last time that the Sun was in its current position in space around the Milky Way, dinosaurs ruled the Earth. in fact, this Sun orbit has only happened 20.4 times since the Sun itself formed 4.6 billion years ago
    ."

    Now come on guys, think outside the box, broaden your horizons. When everything is in movement, exactly what is orbiting what? Just wondering, couldn't the moon be the center of the Universe, I mean with everything else in orbit, exactly where is that center at?
    "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." Nathan Hale, 1776

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    Quote Originally Posted by walking bird View Post
    Wait a second, here... did I get this all wrong?
    Yes, or No or maybe?

    Quote Originally Posted by walking bird View Post
    Isn't it the Earth that moves, while the sun just hangs there?
    No. Surely you jest. But now that you mention it, what is holding it all up, I mean if it fell where would it go?

    Actually, if you ask my wife, she will say that I think that I am the center of the universe. And all things are orbiting around me.
    "I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country." Nathan Hale, 1776

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?


    Good discussion this morning.
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Equinotical (Equintial) Storms?

    Not to be argumentative, because I'm certainly not an expert in this subject, but if you postulate this line of reasoning:

    "Let me see, doesn't the moon orbit around the earth? Yes. So is the earth stationary? No.

    Doesn't the earth orbit the sun? Yes. So is the sun stationary? No.

    Doesn't the sun orbit within the Milky Way? Yes. So is the sun staionary? No."


    Your third line would actually have to read, "Doesn't the sun orbit within the Milky Way? Yes. So is the Milky Way stationary? No."

    Which begs the question... is it? You're stating, I think, that the simple fact that something has a gravitational force whcih causes an object to orbit it, means that same "something" is in movement itself. Is that right?


    One more question: Does the sun orbit within the Milky Way? I hate to sound so ignorant, but at this point I've probably done it so often it can't matter much.

    It makes sense that it would, but is it really moving enough in relation to Earth to cause the kinds of "shadows" etc mentioned in the article you quoted? I'd think it was the Earth's relatively rapid movement that caused that.

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