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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,549

    Default Re: Deep Honey Supers?

    We know folks that do both. We run story and a half brood chambers and medium supers. Deeps have an advantage of cost for capacity and interchangeability, but the weight is an issue, especially when you are pulling many in a day. They hold more honey but you can put less of them in radial extractors, so that is a wash. We can get more story and a half on the truck to CA than a load of doubles so that is an important consideration if pollination is in the cards. While I suppose you could still run deep supers with a story and a half, I don't know anyone that does.

    For expansion the most economical way is to use deep supers and convert them into new brood boxes as you expand. This will give you an idea of how heavy picking up multiple deeps can get and you can decide if you want to run all deeps.
    I know very few beeks that don't suffer from wear and tear eventually. It is good to work hard, but you have a better chance of working pain free longer if you work smart.
    Sheri

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Delta, Utah
    Posts
    494

    Default Re: Deep Honey Supers?

    Lots of great comments I won't repeat. One thing I've noticed using both deeps and mediums as supers is that the queen stays out of the mediums a little more than the deeps.
    -Rob Bliss
    Bliss Honey and bee supplies

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Lawrenceburg, IN
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Deep Honey Supers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    here where I beekeep, we have real heavy honeyflows, and it takes a matter of weeks to take our crop. On a hive per average I am looking at taking between 5-7 boxes a season of production.
    Man that is alot of of honey for that many hives! I'd like to go up to canada and see one of your operations. I don't think I will ever see that much honey down here in Indiana.

    I worked in the carpenters union for awhile so I would like to think the weight wouldn't be an issue. I usually don't use queen excluders with my mediums, but someone made a comment about the queens going into the deeps easier. Do you guys with 1000's of colonies use excluders?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Owen, WI, USA
    Posts
    2,549

    Default Re: Deep Honey Supers?

    Quote Originally Posted by dnelson View Post
    Do you guys with 1000's of colonies use excluders?
    We do. If we didn't it'd take longer to pull, we'd probably lose more queens and we'd often have to wait too long for brood to hatch. We wouldn't get done early enough to get them ready for California.
    Sheri

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Bartonville, TX USA
    Posts
    456

    Default Re: Deep Honey Supers?

    From a different perspective some people are using all mediums, mainly due to weight of handling I believe. There are several commercial beeks down here going that direction but this is a low flow part of the country.

    One downside to a deep/medium combination is the market, supplies and labor for medium nucs is not favorable.

    I use the deep/medium combination because the weight and also it is about right for winter stores in my area. With SHB it is now critical to keep every square inch covered with bees if temperatures are favorable for SHB larvae.

    I rotate frames into medium supers to be drawn and then down into the brood chamber medium before the are culled after a few seasons.

    Deep frames have to go straight into the brood chamber to be drawn. I'd prefer to be dropping drawn frames in instead but extracting deeps is so much more time consuming with my equipment.

    One technique that has worked is to overwinter with a deep over a medium. In the spring instead of reversing the boxes I will pull the medium and replace with a deep on top with 2 or 3 drawn frames. This give me a double deep expansion in the spring to get deeps drawn out. They are then split and a medium added above the chamber is added for the rest of the season. Going into winter the medium will be capped out with honey and pollen and the deep will be capped out on the sides with a brood nest in the middle. At the right point the medium is moved to the bottom so that it is ending the winter empty with the brood nest up in the deep to start the cycle over again.

    Deep frames are kept fresh by constantly siphoning off frames to nuc's. The only margin reducing culling is the overaged medium frames that are stripped for wax. i still get the efficiency on honey extraction of using all mediums. Any honey stored in deeps is used for nuc production: cell builders, mating nucs, spring splits, etc or is used for wintering (we don't extract our fall flow - it generally tastes too bitter).
    "Beware of all enterprises that require new clothes"
    Henry David Thoreau, Walden

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,191

    Default Re: Deep Honey Supers?

    From time to time I get tierd of using excluders, or sometimes I forget to bring enough, so I super up hives without,
    and everytime I am reminded why I use excluders!
    I dont know how these guys here do it without. It takes soo much time to sort brood where I want it, realy slows things down,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Re: Deep Honey Supers?

    Here's another thought, for almond pollination:

    Move into the almonds with singles, bottom super with a MDS of honey for feeding, move the MDS to the top and move out of the almonds.
    Regards,
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

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