Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Algonquin, IL, USA
    Posts
    638

    Default Mouse Guard Question

    Will an entrance reducer, set to the smallest opening, prevent mice from entering a hive during the winter?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Default Re: Mouse Guard Question

    If the hole is 3/8" or less (and they dont "knaw it larger" ).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Ludington, Michigan
    Posts
    648

    Default Re: Mouse Guard Question

    I use 1/2 wire and as long as it is a good tight fit I dont have problems. I would go to 3/8 if it was availble but it is not. As stated the mice can enlarge the small hole in a reducer but I would worry more about one little hole getting plugged by dead bee's
    Last edited by danno; 09-21-2009 at 02:41 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Bristol,MA,USA
    Posts
    728

    Default Re: Mouse Guard Question

    No, it won't and it will allow too much moisture to remain in the hive. My mouse screens, made of 3/8" screen, bent in a V shape and measured precisely so that the ends don't allow any openings, have lasted for nearly fifty years. Good investment. Try to use the same one per hive as bottom board measurements sometimes vary. OMTCW

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Default Re: Mouse Guard Question

    Many years ago, I raised rats and mice. At that time, the mice I had could go through 1/2" hardware cloth.

    Ever "wunder" why one side of a reversable bottom board measures 3/8"?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Default Re: Mouse Guard Question

    Around here a popular reducer is to take a 4" wide piece of 3/8" plywood and three 3/8" laths 4" long and put the laths at each end and the middle of the 4" wide plywood. This is then put on the 3/4" deep side of a bottom. It serves as a draft reducer, entrance reducer and mouse guard. The mice don't seem to want to crawl the 4" at 3/8" deep to get in. And it makes a baffle at the door so the wind doesn't blow in so much.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Bodfish, Ca. USA
    Posts
    14

    Question Re: Mouse Guard Question

    To Cedar Hill: Fifty Years of Beekeeping. Wow. This is my first year and your advice is taken with a great deal of respect. So, you do NOT use an entrance reducer during the winter at all? I live in Central California and the winters are not too cold here. I will use the wire for sure. Question: How do YOU avoid moisture dripping inside the hive during the winter? What method do you use? I thank you in advance for your sage advice.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Cass County, MO
    Posts
    448

    Default Re: Mouse Guard Question

    Is the need for a mouse guard reduced by the use of a tall (14") hive stand and a SBB?
    4 seasons 19 Hives-Camp Branch Bee Ranch. Est 2009
    "I am a nobody; nobody is perfect, and therefore I am perfect."

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Williston, NC, USA
    Posts
    1,779

    Default Re: Mouse Guard Question

    rkr, I'm thinking like you. I do use mouse guards. . .metal ones. . .but I think the fact that my hives are on 21" stands helps. I had voles invade my hives one year before I started using mouse guards (lesson learned), and the only hives that were bothered were two that were on much lower stands.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Mtn. View, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    1,305

    Default Re: Mouse Guard Question

    I am sure that areas differ because of climate and wildlife cover conditions, but I use a 3/8 in. high entrance, an 8 in. high stand, keep the area around the hives mowed and I have never had mice problems. My beekeeping expereience has been limited to Arkansas, but here even with solid bottom boards, moisture is not a problem. The only times I have observed moisture problems has been when I let a colony enter winter with too small an adult population, unripened stores or with a tracheal mite problem.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads