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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Issaquah,WA,USA
    Posts
    2,394

    Default Cane sugar v. High fructose Corn syrup

    One of they guys in our club has access to high fructose corn syrup in 5 gallons for about 22 dollars (I think, need to check the exact pricing). It is 70% sugar concentration. I hear many of the commercial guys use this type of mix. Any plus's or minus's.? with this instead of sugar.

    (+)
    It does save me from having to mix it.
    It is really thick and 70% sugar.
    Wife not mad about mess in kitchen.

    (-)
    Can't add HBH to it easily

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Burke, SD, USA
    Posts
    79

    Default Re: Cane sugar v. High fructose Corn syrup

    When using corn syrup, 10% water is usually added. If you add warm water, mix your HBH in with that and it should incorporate well with a stir. The 10% water is with 55% though not 70% so a different amount of water may need to be added.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    BRUNSWICK,NY
    Posts
    109

    Default Re: Cane sugar v. High fructose Corn syrup

    My son sent me this article today. Thought this would be a good place to post it.
    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0826110118.htm

    Deb

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Issaquah,WA,USA
    Posts
    2,394

    Default Re: Cane sugar v. High fructose Corn syrup

    Here is the text from that article.

    Heat Forms Potentially Harmful Substance In High-fructose Corn Syrup, Bee Study Finds

    ScienceDaily (Aug. 27, 2009) — Researchers have established the conditions that foster formation of potentially dangerous levels of a toxic substance in the high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) that is often fed to honey bees. Their study, which appears in the current issue of ACS' bi-weekly Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, may also have implications for soft drinks and dozens of other human foods that contain HFCS. The substance, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), forms mainly from heating fructose.

    In the new study, Blaise LeBlanc and Gillian Eggleston and colleagues note HFCS's ubiquitous usage as a sweetener in beverages and processed foods. Some commercial beekeepers also feed it to bees to increase reproduction and honey production. When exposed to warm temperatures, HFCS can form HMF and kill honeybees. Some researchers believe that HMF may be a factor in Colony Collapse Disorder, a mysterious disease that has killed at least one-third of the honeybee population in the United States.

    The scientists measured levels of HMF in HFCS products from different manufacturers over a period of 35 days at different temperatures. As temperatures rose, levels of HMF increased steadily. Levels jumped dramatically at about 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

    "The data are important for commercial beekeepers, for manufacturers of HFCS, and for purposes of food storage. Because HFCS is incorporated as a sweetener in many processed foods, the data from this study are important for human health as well," the report states. It adds that studies have linked HMF to DNA damage in humans. In addition, HMF breaks down in the body to other substances potentially more harmful than HMF.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Snowmass, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    2,496

    Default Re: Cane sugar v. High fructose Corn syrup

    Randy Oliver has been talking about the toxic effects of HFCS to honeybees for some time now. Hopefully as more studies come out we will see people start to take notice...but I doubt it. Studies have shown that feeding 1:1 has the same effect of clearing up Nosima that feeding it with Fum B in it but people are still dumping in the Fum B. Subject of another topic another day I suppose.
    Life is tough, but it's tougher when you're stupid.” John Wayne

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Lakeland FL
    Posts
    849

    Default Re: Cane sugar v. High fructose Corn syrup

    i have not heard this alpha where did you get this information? sure sounds a lot cheaper lol

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Pigeon Falls, WI
    Posts
    2,528

    Default Re: Cane sugar v. High fructose Corn syrup


    http://www.scientificbeekeeping.com

    Several times Randy states that pollen patties and syrup reduce spore counts( he had an article last spring he talked about that in but now I don't see it in there). My local inspector has been in touch with another fellow(scientist) that has been doing studies on bees/nosema/contaminated(pesticide/fungicide) pollen and he also said patties and syrup do almost just as good of a job on nosema.

    Back on topic.

    It has been known for years overheated HFCS and self made syrup is toxic to bees.
    Last edited by Beeslave; 08-27-2009 at 06:07 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    VENTURA, California, USA
    Posts
    3,604

    Default Re: Cane sugar v. High fructose Corn syrup

    Here's a recent report that I got this week:
    Catch the Buzz:
    No danger to bees or humans


    The CRA and White say the risk of HMF to humans presented by the new study are also over-egged. They say that a 2000 study by Janzowski et al discounts HMF as posing a serious health risk to humans.


    The new study also suggested that the formation of HMF could be a factor in the decline in honey bee populations, known as colony collapse disorder (CCD). It leant on a study published in 1966 by Bailey to support claims that the toxin that causes gut ulceration and dysentery-like symptoms in bees.


    HFCS is given to bees to stimulate brood rearing and boost honey production. But according to White, properly stored HFCS would not pose a risk for honeybees.


    He cites a study by Jachimowicz et al, published in 1975, which saw that concentrations of up to 3mg HMF per 100g of solution was harmless for bees. This would mean that the base HMF level established by LeBlanc, of 30 parts per million (ppm) is also harmless.


    “Honeybee producers clearly violate published storage recommendations when they expose HFCS to excessive temperatures and store it for prolonged periods in unapproved containers.”


    Nor was HFCS cited as a potential cause of CCD published this year in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences; rather, ribosomal RNA degradation was seen to be the likely cause.


    FoodNavigator’s article on the original study is available here http://www.foodnavigator.com/Science...in-heated-HFCS


    Regards,
    Ernie
    Ernie
    My websitehttp://bees4u.com/

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