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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    >In y'alls' experience, is it faster to crush and strain a super as opposed to removing the cappings and extracting in a 2-frame junior bench extractor (which I was lucky enough to have a brother give to me)?

    Yes it's faster to crush and strain. But you'll get more honey next year if you have drawn comb... if you have more honey than you need anyway, it probably doesn't matter. If you need more wax, then crush and strain would be better.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pinellass County, Florida
    Posts
    1,113

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    If you have a local club see if they loan out

    Also don't think it was mentioned but with cs you get more wax to render

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,538

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    In my opinion, crush-and-strain works great for foundationless approach. Extraction by centrifugal force is suitable for classical frames with foundation. I also noticed that in my case, foundationless frames have always thicker comb than frames with foundation in the same beehive - thus, more honey per frame since I am mostly foundationless. It is amazing how little wax is in freshly made honey-comb! Another advantage of the crush-and-strain method is that it is easy to scale - from kitchen pot to barrel if necessary. Sergey
    Серёжа, Sergey

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    havana fl
    Posts
    1,358

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    Yes it's faster to crush and strain.
    Not sure how it's faster ????
    Im really not that serious

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    I can cut out a comb and mash it in a matter of seconds per comb. To uncap it takes longer than that, and then I still have to extract it, which at best takes several minutes. I can crush and strain a super of honey much faster than I can extract it.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,538

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    Quote Originally Posted by mac View Post
    Not sure how it's faster ????
    Uncapping, loading into extractor, unloading, cleaning extractor when done... it seems to me - just more steps and more equipment...
    Серёжа, Sergey

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Charles City, VA
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    my $.02

    Almost nothing new gets cheaper over time. Buy what you can afford today, because you might not be able to afford it tomorrow. If something happens you can always sell it for most if not all of your money back.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    191

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    Quote Originally Posted by cerezha View Post
    Uncapping, loading into extractor, unloading, cleaning extractor when done... it seems to me - just more steps and more equipment...
    Cool, thanks. I forgot about the time it takes to load, flip the frames over and clean everything out. I will give crush & strain a try this year, hope I don't get my wife angry for dripping honey and/or using her kitchen equipment, and see how it all works out.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    OKC, OK USA
    Posts
    2,870

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    Extraction by centrifugal force is suitable for classical frames with foundation.
    My foundationless extract just fine however I did cross wire them. 8)
    Mike Forbes
    Red Dirt Apiaries

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,538

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    Quote Originally Posted by NasalSponge View Post
    My foundationless extract just fine however I did cross wire them. 8)
    Sure, why not? With my 2 beehives permitted - it just does not make any sense to have a whole extraction "facility"
    Sergey
    Серёжа, Sergey

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,538

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Davidson View Post
    ... hope I don't get my wife angry for dripping honey and/or using her kitchen equipment...
    Yes, very important point! Our house already sticky but I feel that my wife easier tolerate usage of her pot rather than mechanical extractor in the center of the kitchen... we do not have much space...
    Sergey
    Серёжа, Sergey

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    191

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    Quote Originally Posted by NasalSponge View Post
    My foundationless extract just fine however I did cross wire them. 8)
    Being committed to "lazy beekeeping", I didn't cross-wire my spring foundationless and didn't have a single blowout. Just wait until the combs are "cured" and you're good to go, as long as you start from slow and work up to fast.

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Shickshinny, Pennsylvania
    Posts
    919

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    How would the speed of drawing comb on new wax foundation compare to leaving a 3/4'' strip of comb on the top edge like in the video . I just assumed I would have to take my wedge top bar frames apart and slip in a new sheet of foundation every time .

  14. #54
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bloomington In
    Posts
    788

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    I think I would sale comb honey, before crush and strain. Just thought I would put that out there.

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,538

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    Quote Originally Posted by Birdman View Post
    I think I would sale comb honey, before crush and strain. Just thought I would put that out there.
    In US for some reasons people are skeptical about comb honey. In Russia, comb honey is 2x more expensive than regular one. Russians love comb honey because it is all-natural!
    Серёжа, Sergey

  16. #56

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    And it has a nicer flavour, too.

    After you did the crush and strain put the wax and honey in a pan on low heat. Honey and wax separate. This honey is not for eating, but you can make honey mead or honey vinegar. That's what I do. No waste.

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Santa Monica, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,538

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    Ooo
    I think, we have something in common! I "invented" the whole recycling process. I start with crushed honey in double-pot (steamer insert and pot). Honey dripped into the pot. When done, I pour honey into the jars and add some cold boiled water into the pot, reinstall insert with wax. So, the rest (~20%) of the honey retained in crushed wax will dissolve in the water. When done - pour honey-water (d=1.120) into the bottle for fermentation (the mead). Move wax into plastic mesh-bad (from lemons) and place it in the pot, fill up with water, re-install insert. Boil water - wax melted and form a cake on the surface, cool it down. Leftovers from the mesh-bag used as a fertilizer in the garden! So, I have honey, mead, wax, propolis and fertilizer for the garden. My biggest problem is the mead - the taste is inconsistent but my Russian friends drink it anyway
    3 med. frames = 7.4 kg honey + 1 gal the mead (d=1.120) + 0.4 kg wax + some propolis
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by cerezha; 06-28-2013 at 04:49 AM.
    Серёжа, Sergey

  18. #58
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bloomington In
    Posts
    788

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    Quote Originally Posted by cerezha View Post
    In US for some reasons people are skeptical about comb honey. In Russia, comb honey is 2x more expensive than regular one. Russians love comb honey because it is all-natural!
    I have all kinds of people that ask for comb or chunk honey. I would be safe to say around 50% of them.

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,593

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    >I think I would sale comb honey, before crush and strain

    It depends on your market. I did both for 26 years. Some people area always going to want liquid honey... but I agree, you should cultivate a market for comb honey. I find older people and most ethnic groups seem to appreciate it already, you just have to find them.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Branson, MO
    Posts
    577

    Default Re: "cost" of crush and strain

    I find a lot of people ask for comb but it is because they have heard grandma or grandpa talk about it. When it comes down to it most do not come back for more comb just the honey. It's a nostalgic thing for the older generation in the US reminding them of when they did not have candy at their finger tips.
    For the time and effort involved I just crush and strain and only bottle a few quarts of comb for those that I know really want it maybe 15-20 jars a year. In some areas they may pay more but they are not that willing in this area so it's not worth it for me.

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