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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Rutherford Co. NC
    Posts
    335

    Default My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    This past early spring I took a day trip to Brushy Mountain with some other folks also interested in Beekeeping.

    While there I found in the bargain shed a 9 frame extractor. It is manual crank. It has been marked down a couple of hundred dollars due to a couple of small dings in the side of the tank. The inside of the tank was smooth with no jags or snags a the site of these dings less than the size of a nickel so I bought it.

    It is made by an Italian company SAF Natura. The extractor will hold 3 deep frames tangentially, or 9 mediums radially or 9 shallow radially. The manual crank on this machine has a safety feature. If you are not maintaining the same speed as the extractor the handle will disengage from the crank mechanism. This is important to prevent broken arms, wrists, or jawbone if you are short like I am. Basically you push against a spring to engage the handle to the crank, then if you let go it springs away and the gears are not longer engaged. If you drop the handle you don't have it cracking against your arm with the full weight of the honey frames behind it. This is a good thing.

    All went well with the first use of this extractor. It fits well coming in and out of the basement door. ( have French doors incase of a larger extractor in the future, LOL).

    Manual crank. This was not as much of a bother as I had imagined. At first I struggled against the safety while trying to spin the thing way to fast. Then the novelty of warp speed wore off and there was no problem. You just have to find that nice steady speed that you can maintain without disengaging the handle from the mechanism and just keep moving the crank.

    You can sit on a bar stool and crank while watching the big screen, or you can put your kindle on the counter next to you and watch prime, or Netflix. Or you can have your child have a turn.

    The amount of force needed to get the thing moving is not all that great. The amount of force needed to keep the pace is even less. It is time consuming but not overly strenuous at all. Not unlike when riding a bike where you need more force to get moving ,but far less to keep a certain pace on flat road.

    Compared to crushing and squeezing that we did last year, I am glad I made the investment. Maybe in the future I will get a motor, but that is not a biggie at this point. Perhaps I will have enough supers next year that I will feel pressed to get a motor. I can hope anyway. It was nice to preserve those beautiful combs and return them to the hives. Even better to not have to cleanup and replace foundation on all of those frames.

    Overall the extractor seems well made. It might bother some that the top and bottom of the "cage" are made of plastic/resin of some sort. However these are quite sturdy. Unless there is an aging that makes the plastic brittle, I don't think there will be a problem The extractor did not walk around unless we were trying to spin it too fast. As long as we maintained the highest speed that we could keep the handle engaged comfortably, then it did not walk around.

    There are holes in the bottom of the legs that could be used to fasten it to a board, or to put feet of some kind on it if needed. This fact might feature later when adding a motor.

    When adding frames, they were not all the same. Despite only taking capped honey some were partially filled out others fully, some on one side but not as much on the other. I just used common sense and tried to put heavy frames in each of the three section centers then less full all to the left, then whatever th the right making up the 9 total frames. In this way, they were approximately even.

    I was worried about the thing bouncing or having trouble with it vibrating or making noise due to imbalance, but just having a common sense approach was enough. There were no problems due to imbalance among the frames. Additionally doing the last batch of 4 frames was no trouble. I took the heaviest 2 one per section in the centers, and the last lighter two in the outer slots of the last section. It worked like a charm once again.

    I plan to stay in beekeeping as a hobby for the long term. I am glad I made this purchase. I am glad I did not spend hundreds of dollars trying to reinvent the wheel so to speak, and break my wrist or several drill motors trying. I think that having been able to return built comb to my bees in late spring might mean they will be filled with Sourwood later. if this is the case, the bees might pay for this extractor by the second season.

    Cleanup was easy. to prepare for use, I washed with hose outside, then brought it in and did a sanitary wash inside letting it drain into a bucket. I then did a couple of rinses then use paper toweling to dab up remaining water in bottom seam. Post honey extraction Use COLD water the first time to dislodge any wax, then use warmer water to dislodge honey later. I took the basket to the walk in shower, and washed up the extractor outside. I had always heard about all of the mess, its just not that big a deal.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Lamar Co. Alabama, USA
    Posts
    3,396

    Default Re: My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    Appreciate the review! I have one of their 4 frame extractors from the same company and it's nicely built and works well. You could get a piece of 3/4" plywood and mount the extractor on it (bolts facing up with counter sunk holes to prevent floor damage) so it won't walk across the floor like mine tried before I attached it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Chatham County, NC, USA
    Posts
    12

    Default Re: My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    I have the same extractor. I've been more than happy with no complaints. This is my second year using it and I need to keep all the drawn comb they'll make.

    Why are you cleaning it after use though? I let it sit outside for a few hours and the bees will have it bone dry in no time. More honey back in the hives! I'll rinse/clean before the next time, but the bees will clean it more than enough post-use.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Rutherford Co. NC
    Posts
    335

    Default Re: My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    It was cleaned to remove wax flakes and sticky residue. A plastic pastry scraper had been used to get the sides and bottom comepletely clean down to the touch of sticky.

    We got almost a pint by scraping then tilting and pushing it out the gate. Then it was washed with cold soapy water then warm water then rinsed and dried. At the end of summer it will be sanitized and rinsed and dried for use then cleaned.

    I could have let the bees lick the last pint of honey, but woulf still have needed to wash and rinse and dry. Why give back honey I worked to steal. Lol.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    3,605

    Default Re: My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    I used this same extractor for about 7 years. I bought it used and now its still being used by a fellow beekeeper. That little machine spun a LOT of honey and is still going strong. Overall and nice machine and has held up well, but hand cranking gets pretty old after a while
    Horseshoe Point Honey -- http://localvahoney.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Rutherford Co. NC
    Posts
    335

    Default Re: My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    As long as I can sit and hear honey rain while turning the crank, I think I can stand it. Of course im inside with a cold beversge, and a nice flat screen. That raining sound never got old this time around. I hope the novelty does not wear of too soon.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Chapel Hill, NC USA
    Posts
    80

    Default Re: My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    I bought one of these this year. Looking forward to using it this weekend. A friend of mine has one of the motorized versions that I used last year. Very nice if you've got a lot of frames to extract. The motor has very smooth speed control.
    Walter

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermilion, OHio
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    I've got the same extractor (but with the motor) I purchased at an auction a couple years ago. One "improvement" I've made is based on a number of suggestions in various posts I've read here - I purchased 3 urethane type wheels (probably 1 1/2" diameter) with bolts that I installed into the holes in the bottom of the legs. Allowing the extractor to roll around a little really takes the vibration away, and adds to the ease of moving it around. Someday I hope to have enough hives and a big enough extractor I need to anchor it in concrete, but till then I'm very happy with this unit.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Rutherford Co. NC
    Posts
    335

    Default Re: My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    What keeps it from rolling away from the honey tank?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermilion, OHio
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    My floor is flat, so I guess that keeps it from rolling due to gravity, but when it's extracting with poorly balanced frames it just kind of oscillates back and forth, never rolling more than an inch or so. I keep an eye on it, but Ive found using casters really works well. Less noise of it vibrating around, no scratching up the floor (I extract in a kitchen). it's counter-intuitive, but it works.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: My experience with 9 frame extractor from Brushy Mountain.

    I have one I bought a couple years ago it sure does shake a lot how did you mount it and how fast do you spin it? I guess spin it till it starts to shake then back off? Thanks jeff

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